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Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 29.12.2016
Hidden Rivers Form Deep Down in the Earth’s Subsurface Layers
Findings of Study by Scientists from Freie Universität Berlin and Utrecht University Published in "Nature Geoscience" ' 444/2016 from Dec 29, 2016 Earth scientists from among others Utrecht University and Freie Universität Berlin have found new clues how water moves inside the Earth's deep subsurface layers and ultimately back to the surface through volcanic activity.

Earth Sciences - 19.12.2016
Megathrust earthquakes
The raggedness of the ocean floors could be the key to triggering some of the Earth's most powerful earthquakes, scientists from Cardiff University have discovered. In a new study published today the team, also from Utrecht University, suggest that large bumps and mounds on the sea floor could be the trigger point that causes the crust in the Earth's oceans to drastically slip beneath the crust on the continent and generate a giant earthquake.

Earth Sciences - 19.12.2016
'Tiny earthquakes' help scientists predict mountain rock falls
‘Tiny earthquakes’ help scientists predict mountain rock falls
'Tiny earthquakes' help scientists predict mountain rock falls The risk of mountain rock falls in regions with sub-zero temperatures, such as the Swiss Alps and parts of Canada, could be better predicted by using technology which measures 'tiny earthquakes' - according to a group of international experts.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 12.12.2016
8,000-year record of climate change
8,000-year record of climate change
An international team of researchers has found that the Antarctic Ice Sheet plays a major role in regional and global climate variability - a discovery that may also help explain why sea ice in the Southern Hemisphere has been increasing despite the warming of the rest of the Earth. The Antarctic Ice Sheet has experienced much greater natural variability in the past than previously anticipated.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 12.12.2016
Atmospheric methane concentrations are rising faster since 2007
An international group of researchers led by LSCE (CEA-CNRS-UVSQ) has published a thorough budget of methane sources and sinks 1 over the last decade in the Earth System Science Data (ESSD) journal,

Physics - Earth Sciences - 09.12.2016
Understanding how ice crystals form in clouds
Understanding how ice crystals form in clouds
How ice forms on the surfaces of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere has been revealed by a team from UCL and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany. More than 90% of precipitation over land relies on the formation of ice crystals on airborne aerosol particles but why only a tiny fraction of all atmospheric particles can initiate ice growth is unknown.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 08.12.2016
Amber specimen offers rare glimpse of feathered dinosaur tail
Amber specimen offers rare glimpse of feathered dinosaur tail
Researchers from China, Canada, and the University of Bristol have discovered a dinosaur tail complete with its feathers trapped in a piece of amber. The finding reported today in Current Biology helps to fill in details of the dinosaurs' feather structure and evolution, which can't be surmised from fossil evidence.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 06.12.2016
Researcher and amateur science sleuth find cosmic dust in cities
Researcher and amateur science sleuth find cosmic dust in cities
Scientists have found cosmic dust for the first time in urban places, on rooftops in three of the world's major cities. "When Jon first came to me I was dubious. Many people had reported finding cosmic dust in urban areas before, but when they were analysed scientists found that these particles were all industrial in origin.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 06.12.2016
Longest-living animal gives up ocean secrets
Analysis of the quahog clam reveals how the oceans affected the climate over the past 1000 years A study of the longest-living animal on Earth, the quahog clam, has provided researchers with an unprecedented insight into the history of the oceans. By studying the chemistry of growth rings in the shells of the quahog clam, experts from the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences have pieced together the history of the North Atlantic Ocean over the past 1000 years and discovered how its role in driving the atmospheric climate has drastically changed.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 05.12.2016
Climate change will drive stronger, smaller storms in U.S
The effects of climate change will likely cause smaller but stronger storms in the United States, according to a new framework for modeling storm behavior developed at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory. Though storm intensity is expected to increase over today's levels, the predicted reduction in storm size may alleviate some fears of widespread severe flooding in the future.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 28.11.2016
Marine sediments record variations in the Earth's magnetic field
Marine sediments record variations in the Earth’s magnetic field
Past variations in the strength of the Earth's magnetic field are reflected by the production of isotopes in the atmosphere.

Earth Sciences - 28.11.2016
Biggest exposed fault on Earth
Geologists have for the first time seen and documented the Banda Detachment fault in eastern Indonesia and worked out how it formed. Lead researcher Dr Jonathan Pownall from The Australian National University (ANU) said the find will help researchers assess dangers of future tsunamis in the area, which is part of the Ring of Fire - an area around the Pacific Ocean basin known for earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

Earth Sciences - Mathematics - 25.11.2016
Subduction zone geometry: a mega-earthquake risk indicator
Subduction zone geometry: a mega-earthquake risk indicator
Mega-earthquakes (with a magnitude greater than 8.5) mainly occur on subduction faults where one tectonic plate passes under another. But the probability of such earthquakes does not appear to be even across these zones. In a study published on 25 November 2016 in the journal Science , researchers from the University of Oregon and Géoazur laboratory (CNRS/Université Nice Sophia Antipolis/Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur/IRD) show that mega-earthquakes mostly occur on the flattest subduction zones.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 23.11.2016
New hazard caused by volcanic eruptions discovered
New hazard caused by volcanic eruptions discovered
Scientists approach the broken, steaming ground around the Cordón Caulle vent, which was hugely uplifted during the 2011 eruption. Little of the slope seen behind the black lava flow would have been visible before the uplift occurred. Courtesy of Dr Hugh Tuffen. Research has identified, for the first time, a new type of hazard caused by explosive volcanic eruptions.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 23.11.2016
Hurricane risk to Northeast USA coast increasing
Hurricane risk to Northeast USA coast increasing
The Northeastern coast of the USA could be struck by more frequent and more powerful hurricanes in the future due to shifting weather patterns, according to new research. Hurricanes have gradually moved northwards from the western Caribbean towards northern North America over the past few hundred years, the study led by Durham University, UK, found.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 18.11.2016
Scientist contributes to dinosaur extinction impact site study
An international team of scientists have shown how a massive crater caused by the impact of the asteroid which killed the dinosaurs also deformed rocks in a way that may have produced habitats for early life. Around 65 million years ago, a massive asteroid crashed into the Gulf of Mexico causing an impact so huge that the blast and subsequent knock-on effects wiped out around 75 per cent of all life on Earth, including most of the dinosaurs.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 18.11.2016
Chicxulub: a unique crater to elucidate planetary surfaces
Chicxulub: a unique crater to elucidate planetary surfaces
The fall of an asteroid in the Yucatán Peninsula (Mexico) 66 million years ago is believed to have caused the extinction of dinosaurs. It also created the Chicxulub impact crater, the only such crater on Earth that still has a peak ring – a type of structure commonly found, in contrast, on the surface of several objects in the Solar System.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 17.11.2016
Asteroid impacts could create niches for life, suggests Chicxulub crater study
Asteroid impacts could create niches for life, suggests Chicxulub crater study
Scientists studying the Chicxulub crater have shown how large asteroid impacts deform rocks in a way that may produce habitats for early life. Around 65 million years ago a massive asteroid crashed into the Gulf of Mexico causing an impact so huge that the blast and subsequent knock-on effects wiped out around 75 per cent of all life on Earth, including most of the dinosaurs.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 15.11.2016
Antarctic Snowscapes for Predicting the Weather
Antarctic Snowscapes for Predicting the Weather
EPFL scientists measured for the first time - at centimeter resolutions - how the snowscape of Antarctic ice in the sea changed, before and after a blizzard. This data will help build better weather models for the South Pole and the world's climate. EPFL scientists provided the first detailed measurements of how a blizzard affects snow cover on an Antarctic ice floe.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 15.11.2016
Cliff erosion rates in Sussex have accelerated ten-fold in the past 200 years
Cliff erosion rates in Sussex have accelerated ten-fold in the past 200 years
The erosion rates of cliffs along the Sussex coast have rapidly sped up in the last 200 years, a new study has found. The research shows that the erosion rates along Beachy Head and Seaford Head in Sussex had remained relatively stable, at around two to six centimetres each year, for thousands of years.
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