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Chemistry - Physics - 15.08.2016
New technique may help detect Martian life
In 2020, NASA plans to launch a new Mars rover that will be tasked with probing a region of the planet scientists believe could hold remnants of ancient microbial life.

Physics - Life Sciences - 12.08.2016
Nanomaterial safety screening could become faster, cheaper with new laboratory test
Platform developed at UCLA uses lab-on-a-chip technology to predict how hazardous engineered nanomaterials might be Meghan Steele Horan Kyeong-Sik Shin SELFA uses microchip technology to analyze samples more accurately than other current methods, and in as little as 30 minutes. UCLA researchers have designed a laboratory test that uses microchip technology to predict how potentially hazardous nanomaterials could be.

Physics - 11.08.2016
A zeptosecond stopwatch for the microcosm
A zeptosecond stopwatch for the microcosm
For the first time ever, laser physicists have recorded an internal atomic event with an accuracy of a trillionth of a billionth of a second. When light strikes electrons in atoms, their states can change unimaginably quickly. Laser physicists at LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ) have now measured the duration of such a phenomenon - namely that of photoionization, in which an electron exits a helium atom after excitation by light - for the first time with zeptosecond precision.

Health - Physics - 10.08.2016
Car drivers are four kilograms heavier than cyclists, new study reveals
Car drivers are four kilograms heavier than cyclists, new study reveals
People who drive cars as their main form of transport are on average heavier than those who cycle, according to an ongoing Europe-wide study. Researchers have so far monitored 11,000 volunteers in seven European cities, asking them how they move around the city, which mode of transport they use and how much time they spend travelling.

Physics - 10.08.2016
Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider ready to find magnetic monopoles
Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider ready to find magnetic monopoles
Scientists searching for magnetic monopoles - fundamental magnetic particles - have shown they could detect them if they are produced at the LHC. Magnetism comes with two poles, North and South, similar to the way that electricity comes with two charges, positive and negative. However, while it is easy to isolate a positive or negative electric charge, nobody has ever seen a solitary magnetic charge, or monopole.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 08.08.2016
Neutrino search finds no evidence of hidden? particle
An exhaustive search for a ghostly subatomic particle called the sterile neutrino has come up empty, weakening the case for its existence. Scientists from MIT and the University of Wisconsin at Madison, along with 40 other institutions, report today in Physical Review Letters that after analyzing 20,000 neutrinos detected over the span of a year at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole, they were unable to observe any sign of sterile, or 'hidden,' neutrinos.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.08.2016
Evidence mounts that neutrinos are the key to the universe's existence
Evidence mounts that neutrinos are the key to the universe’s existence
New experimental results show a difference in the way neutrinos and antineutrinos behave, which could explain why matter persists over antimatter. The results, from the T2K experiment in Japan, show that the degree to which neutrinos change their type differs from their antineutrino counterparts. This is important because if all types of matter and antimatter behave the same way, they should have obliterated each other shortly after the Big Bang.

Physics - Electroengineering - 05.08.2016
Light could exist in a previously unknown form
Light could exist in a previously unknown form
New research suggests that it is possible to create a new form of light by binding light to a single electron, combining the properties of both. According to the scientists behind the study, from Imperial College London, the coupled light and electron would have properties that could lead to circuits that work with packages of light - photons - instead of electrons.

History / Archeology - Physics - 04.08.2016
Fresh look at burials, mass graves, tells a new story of Cahokia
New studies offer insight into the people who lived and died in the pre-Columbian city of Cahokia, near present-day St. Louis. Graphic by Julie McMahon CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — A new study challenges earlier interpretations of an important burial mound at Cahokia, a pre-Columbian city in Illinois near present-day St. Louis.

Social Sciences - Physics - 04.08.2016
Ancient bones, teeth, tell story of strife at Cahokia
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Dozens of people buried in mass graves in an ancient mound in Cahokia, a pre-Columbian city in Illinois near present-day St. Louis, likely lived in or near Cahokia most of their lives, researchers report in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology. Cahokia, North America's first city, grew rapidly starting about 950 and reached its zenith between 1150 and 1200 with an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 people.

Physics - Mathematics - 04.08.2016
On the cusp of quantum supremacy
On the cusp of quantum supremacy
The first step on a new path to quantum supremacy has been proposed by a mathematician from the University of Bristol. Quantum computers are a new type of computing device that use the principles of quantum mechanics to do things that standard computers cannot do. Large-scale quantum computers are predicted to dramatically outperform current supercomputers for tasks ranging from simulating quantum-mechanical systems to cracking cryptographic codes, and could be used to design new drugs and novel materials.

Chemistry - Physics - 03.08.2016
5 Nanoscience Research Projects That Could Deliver Big Results
Berkeley Lab researchers are using the science of the very small to help solve big challenges. That's because, at the nanoscale'the scale of molecules and proteins'new and exciting properties emerge that can possibly be put to use. Here are five projects, now underway and recently highlighted in the news center , which promise big results from the smallest of building blocks: 1.

Physics - Chemistry - 02.08.2016
Researchers Invent Cheaper, Flexible Smart Windows
AUSTIN, Texas - Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have invented a new flexible smart window material that, when incorporated into windows, sunroofs, or even curved glass surfaces, will have the ability to control both heat and light from the sun. Their article about the new material will be published in the September .

Physics - 01.08.2016
Microscope becomes gauge to measure forces within crystals
All materials found in nature - even the most 'perfect' diamond - contain defects, since the atoms inside them are never arranged in perfect order. Such structural disorder causes complex force distributions throughout the material. Measuring these forces is critical to understanding the material's behavior, but these force measurements have been impossible to perform through conventional techniques, which only determine average responses to stress.

Physics - 01.08.2016
Microscope helps measure forces between crystals
All materials found in nature - even the most 'perfect' diamond - contain defects, since the atoms inside them are never arranged in perfect order. Such structural disorder causes complex force distributions throughout the material. Measuring these forces is critical to understanding the material's behavior, but these force measurements have been impossible to perform through conventional techniques, which only determine average responses to stress.

Mathematics - Physics - 29.07.2016
An equation is helping scientists to see parallels between magnets and flocks
An equation is helping scientists to see parallels between magnets and flocks
A scientist has shown mathematically that the dynamics that govern swarms and bird flocks may also govern the properties of things like magnets. The researcher from Imperial College London has developed a mathematical equation to understand more about motility. This phenomenon refers to the ability of individual birds, insects or cells to actively influence the overall shape of swarms, flocks and human tissue.

Chemistry - Physics - 27.07.2016
Lonely Atoms, Happily Reunited
Lonely Atoms, Happily Reunited
The remarkable behaviour of platinum atoms on magnetite surfaces could lead to better catalysts. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) can now explain how platinum atoms can form pairs with the help of carbon monoxide. At first glance, magnetite appears to be a rather inconspicuous grey mineral. But on an atomic scale, it has remarkable properties: on magnetite, single metal atoms are held in place, or they can be made to move across the surface.

Physics - Electroengineering - 26.07.2016
The Exception and its Rules
The Exception and its Rules
"Exceptional points" give rise to counter-intuitive physical effects. Researchers from TU Wien (Vienna) make use of these phenomena to create a novel kind of wave guide, which is now being presented in the journal "Nature". No matter whether it is acoustic waves, quantum matter waves or optical waves of a laser - all kinds of waves can be in different states of oscillation, corresponding to different frequencies.

Health - Physics - 25.07.2016
Patch that delivers drug, gene, and light-based therapy to tumor sites shows promising results
Approximately one in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime, making it the third-most prevalent form of the disease in the U.S. In Europe, it is the second-most common form of cancer. The most widely used first line of treatment is surgery, but this can result in incomplete removal of the tumor.

Electroengineering - Physics - 22.07.2016
Mapping electromagnetic waveforms
Munich physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second. Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and it is difficult to capture them in action.
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