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Physics - 01.12.2016
ANU demonstrates ’ghost imaging’ with atoms
A team of physicists at ANU have used a technique known as 'ghost imaging' to create an image of an object from atoms that never interact with it. This is the first time that ghost imaging has been achieved using atoms, although it has previously been demonstrated with light, leading to applications being developed for imaging and remote sensing through turbulent environments.

Physics - Life Sciences - 30.11.2016
A method for storing vaccines at room temperature
A method for storing vaccines at room temperature
Several simple and inexpensive techniques make it possible to store antiviral-vaccines at room temperature for several months.

Environment - Physics - 29.11.2016
Simulations for More Efficient Power Stations
Simulations for More Efficient Power Stations
In most cases, electricity is produced when water is heated and transformed into vapour. Vapour bubbles in the water play a decisive role in this process by collecting in a layer at a heated wall.

Physics - Chemistry - 29.11.2016
Glowing Crystals Can Detect, Cleanse Contaminated Drinking Water
Glowing Crystals Can Detect, Cleanse Contaminated Drinking Water
Tiny, glowing crystals designed to detect and capture heavy-metal toxins such as lead and mercury could prove to be a powerful new tool in locating and cleaning up contaminated water sources. Motivated by publicized cases in which high levels of heavy metals were found in drinking water in Flint, Mich., and Newark, N.J., a science team led by researchers at Rutgers University used intense X-rays at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) to probe the structure of the crystals they developed and learn how they bind to heavy metals.

Physics - Electroengineering - 29.11.2016
Engineers create prototype chip just three atoms thick
Engineers create prototype chip just three atoms thick
Ever since scientists discovered that atomically thin materials could have useful electronic properties, engineers have been seeking ways to mass-produce so-called single-layer chips. A new technique shows how it might be done. For more than 50 years, silicon chipmakers have devised inventive ways to switch electricity on and off, generating the digital ones and zeroes that encode words, pictures, movies and other forms of data.

Life Sciences - Physics - 28.11.2016
New Regulator of Immune Reaction Discovered
New Regulator of Immune Reaction Discovered
Cells of the immune system can distinguish between protein molecules that are "self" and "non-self". ­For example, if we are exposed to pathogens such as bacteria or viruses that carry foreign molecules on their surface, the body reacts with an immune response. In contrast, cells are "tolerant" of the body's own molecules.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 28.11.2016
Marine sediments record variations in the Earth's magnetic field
Marine sediments record variations in the Earth’s magnetic field
Past variations in the strength of the Earth's magnetic field are reflected by the production of isotopes in the atmosphere.

Materials Science - Physics - 28.11.2016
Networked colours
Networked colours
A team that includes ETH Zurich scientists is the first to use materials with a network-like structure to create a full spectrum of intense colours.

Physics - Electroengineering - 25.11.2016
New method for analyzing crystal structure
New method for analyzing crystal structure
A new technique developed by MIT researchers reveals the inner details of photonic crystals, synthetic materials whose exotic optical properties are the subject of widespread research. Photonic crystals are generally made by drilling millions of closely spaced, minuscule holes in a slab of transparent material, using variations of microchip-fabrication methods.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.11.2016
Artwork inspired by gravitational wave discovery
A large oil painting inspired by the first ever detection of gravitational waves is to be unveiled at Cardiff University. Penelope Cowley, a local artist who specialises in bringing art and science together, will present her work at the University's School of Physics and Astronomy, along with a video showcasing a unique artistic spin on the discovery.

Chemistry - Physics - 24.11.2016
For platinum catalysts, a tiny squeeze gives a big boost in performance, Stanford study finds
Squeezing a platinum catalyst a fraction of a nanometer nearly doubles its catalytic activity, a finding that could lead to better fuel cells and other clean energy technologies. A nanosize squeeze can significantly boost the performance of platinum catalysts that help generate energy in fuel cells, according to a new study by Stanford scientists.

Physics - Materials Science - 24.11.2016
A new perovskite could lead the next generation of data storage
A new perovskite could lead the next generation of data storage
EPFL scientists have developed a new perovskite material with unique properties that can be used to build next-generation hard drives.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.11.2016
Capturing an elusive spectrum of light
Capturing an elusive spectrum of light
Researchers led by EPFL have built ultra-high quality optical cavities for the elusive mid-infrared spectral region, paving the way for new chemical and biological sensors, as well as promising technologies. The mid-infrared spectral window, referred to as 'molecular fingerprint region,' includes light wavelengths from 2.5 to 20 'm.

Life Sciences - Physics - 23.11.2016
Daylight saving could save koalas
Daylight saving could save koalas
A University of Queensland-led study has found that adopting daylight saving time in South-East Queensland could help koala conservation. Researchers tracked wild koalas and compared their movements with traffic patterns along roads where they were often killed. UQ School of Biological Sciences researcher Associate Professor Robbie Wilson said the study found daylight saving time would decrease car collisions with koalas by eight per cent on weekdays and 11 per cent on weekends.

Chemistry - Physics - 23.11.2016
Scientists Trace 'Poisoning' in Chemical Reactions to the Atomic Scale
Scientists Trace ’Poisoning’ in Chemical Reactions to the Atomic Scale
Researchers have revealed new atomic-scale details about pesky deposits that can stop or slow chemical reactions vital to fuel production and other processes. This disruption to reactions is known as deactivation or poisoning. The research team employed a combination of measurements, including X-ray experiments at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), to gather the most detailed information yet on problematic carbon-based deposits called "coke,” and to find ways to prevent its formation or reduce its effects.

Life Sciences - Physics - 23.11.2016
Daylight savings could save koalas
Daylight savings could save koalas
A University of Queensland-led study has found that adopting daylight saving time in South-East Queensland could help koala conservation. Researchers tracked wild koalas and compared their movements with traffic patterns along roads where they were often killed. UQ School of Biological Sciences researcher Associate Professor Robbie Wilson said the study found daylight saving time would decrease car collisions with koalas by eight per cent on weekdays and 11 per cent on weekends.

Physics - 22.11.2016
New Quantum States for Better Quantum Memories
New Quantum States for Better Quantum Memories
How can quantum information be stored as long as possible? An important step forward in the development of quantum memories has been achieved by a research team of TU Wien. An artificial diamond under the optical microscope. The diamond fluoresces because due to a number of nitrogen defects. Measurement equipment for the production of durable quantum states.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 21.11.2016
A Stellar Circle of Life
A Stellar Circle of Life
A snapshot of the stellar life cycle has been captured in a new portrait from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Smithsonian's Submillimeter Array (SMA). A cloud that is giving birth to stars has been observed to reflect X-rays from Cygnus X-3, a source of X-rays produced by a system where a massive star is slowly being eaten by its companion black hole or neutron star.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 21.11.2016
How to monitor global ocean warming - without harming whales
How to monitor global ocean warming - without harming whales
Most of the extra heat trapped by human-generated emissions is ending up in the oceans. But tracking the temperature of the world's oceans to monitor the change is trickier than it might seem. While satellites monitor surface temperature, measuring the ocean's interior temperature poses a logistical challenge.

Physics - Health - 18.11.2016
A New Understanding of Metastability Clears Path for Next-Generation Materials
A New Understanding of Metastability Clears Path for Next-Generation Materials
They say diamonds are forever, but diamonds in fact are a metastable form of carbon that will slowly but eventually transform into graphite, another form of carbon. Being able to design and synthesize other long-lived, thermodynamically metastable materials could be a potential gold mine for materials designers, but until now, scientists lacked a rational understanding of them.