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Physics - Health - 03.11.2016
France doubles its experimental capability in nuclear physics
France doubles its experimental capability in nuclear physics
The new SPIRAL2 particle accelerator at the French large heavy-ion accelerator GANIL (CNRS/CEA), inaugurated on November 3 in the presence of the French President François Hollande, will be able to p

Life Sciences - Physics - 02.11.2016
Computer Simulation Breaks Virus Apart To Learn How it Comes Together
Researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University physicist Markus Deserno and University of Konstanz (Germany) chemist Christine Peter have developed a computer simulation that crushes viral capsids. By allowing researchers to see how the tough shells break apart, the simulation provides a computational window for looking at how viruses and proteins assemble.

Chemistry - Physics - 02.11.2016
Liquid crystal design method could speed development of cheap chemical sensors
University of Wisconsin-Madison chemical engineers have developed a new way to create inexpensive chemical sensors for detecting explosives, industrial pollutants or even the chemical markers of disease in a patient's breath. Manos Mavrikakis and Nicholas L. Abbott , UW?Madison professors of chemical and biological engineering, combined their expertise in computational chemistry and liquid crystals to turn a sensor Abbott built to detect a molecular mimic of deadly sarin gas into a roadmap for tuning similar sensors to flag other dangerous or important chemicals.

Life Sciences - Physics - 02.11.2016
Gatekeeping Proteins to Aberrant RNA: You Shall Not Pass
Gatekeeping Proteins to Aberrant RNA: You Shall Not Pass
Mistakes happen. This is the case in the process of transporting genetic information in cells. How our cells keep errors in this process in check is the subject of a new paper by researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). They found that RNA-binding proteins are regulated such that gateway proteins can recognize and block aberrant strands of genetic code from exiting the nucleus.

Physics - Chemistry - 01.11.2016
Hot on the heels of quasiparticles
Hot on the heels of quasiparticles
Electrons in a solid can team up to form so-called quasiparticles, which lead to new phenomena. Physicists at ETH in Zurich have now studied previously unidentified quasiparticles in a new class of atomically thin semiconductors.

Chemistry - Physics - 31.10.2016
Engineers set record for capturing and storing solar energy in hydrogen fuel
Stanford scientists used the electricity generated by high-efficiency solar cells to turn water into a chemical capable of storing 30 percent of the sun's energy over long periods of time. Solar energy has the potential to provide abundant power, but only if scientists solve two key issues: storing the energy for use at all hours, particularly at night, and making the technology more cost effective.

Physics - Life Sciences - 31.10.2016
Purple bacteria shine path to super-efficient light harvesting
Purple bacteria shine path to super-efficient light harvesting
In its billions of years on earth, plant life has become super-efficient at using light - and now it's showing how it does it. A quantum - minuscule - examination of chlorophyll within certain purple bacteria shows an exceptionally efficient geometric arrangement for light harvesting, say scientists from The University of Queensland and Iran's Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 27.10.2016
How planets like Jupiter form
How planets like Jupiter form
Young giant planets are born from gas and dust. Researchers of ETH Zürich and the Universities of Zürich and Bern simulated different scenarios relying on the computing power of the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS) to find out how they exactly form and evolve. Astronomers set up two theories explaining how gaseous giant planets like Jupiter or Saturn could be born.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 25.10.2016
Breakthrough Listen to search for intelligent life around weird star
Tabby's star has provoked so much excitement over the past year, with speculation that it hosts a highly advanced civilization capable of building orbiting megastructures to capture the star's energy, that UC Berkeley's Breakthrough Listen project is devoting hours of time on the Green Bank radio telescope to see if it can detect any signals from intelligent extraterrestrials.

Environment - Physics - 25.10.2016
Hybrid cyber defences could be answer to protect critical infrastructure
Hybrid cyber defences could be answer to protect critical infrastructure
Security research paves the way towards new hybrid cyber defences for nationally critical buildings. Power stations, water supplies, oil refineries, large transport hubs and telecommunication networks are all defined as critical infrastructure needed for a country to function normally. However, the importance of these assets mean they are also likely targets of malicious cyber attacks - particularly from terrorist or state actors.

Physics - Chemistry - 21.10.2016
Genes on the rack
Genes on the rack
Physicists at LMU have developed a novel nanotool that provides a facile means of characterizing the mechanical properties of biomolecules. Faced with the thousands of proteins and genes found in virtually every cell in the body, biologists want to know how they all work exactly: How do they interact to carry out their specific functions and how do they respond and adapt to perturbations? One of the crucial factors in all of these processes is the question of how biomolecules react to the minuscule forces that operate at the molecular level.

Physics - Chemistry - 20.10.2016
Safe new storage method could be key to future of hydrogen-powered vehicles
Hydrogen is often described as the fuel of the future, particularly when applied to hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. One of the main obstacles facing this technology - a potential solution to future sustainable transport - has been the lack of a lightweight, safe on-board hydrogen storage material.

Physics - Electroengineering - 17.10.2016
Researchers road-test powerful method for studying singlet fission
Researchers road-test powerful method for studying singlet fission
In a new study, researchers measure the spin properties of electronic states produced in singlet fission - a process which could have a central role in the future development of solar cells. Future research will focus on making devices and examining how these states can be harnessed for use in solar cells Leah Weiss Physicists have successfully employed a powerful technique for studying electrons generated through singlet fission, a process which it is believed will be key to more efficient solar energy production in years to come.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 14.10.2016
New dwarf planet solar system's 2nd most distant
New dwarf planet solar system’s 2nd most distant
ANN ARBOR?Astronomers at the University of Michigan and their colleagues on the Dark Energy Survey have discovered a new dwarf planet that's more than 90 times farther from the sun than Earth is, making it the second-most distant minor planet in the known solar system. The Dark Energy Survey, which uses a powerful digital camera called DECam on a 4-meter telescope in Chile, was designed to capture images of distant galaxies to understand why the expansion of the universe is accelerating.

Life Sciences - Physics - 14.10.2016
Bacteria can make underground nuclear waste repositories safer
Bacteria can make underground nuclear waste repositories safer
Naturally occurring bacteria could consume pent-up hydrogen gas in nuclear waste repositories to prevent radioactive leaks, say researchers at EPFL. Scientists may have found an unexpected ally in the long-term disposal of nuclear waste: bacteria. In a recent study, a research team led by EPFL discovered a microbial community made up of seven species of bacteria that live naturally hundreds of meters underground in the very rock layers that have been chosen to host Swiss nuclear waste.

Physics - Chemistry - 13.10.2016
Exceptionally robust quantum states found in industrially important semiconductor
This image shows an electron quantum bit (purple arrow near center) in a silicon carbide crystal interacting with nuclear spins that are derived from naturally occurring 29Si (green arrows) and 13C (red arrows) isotopes. A grey pyramid indicates the local crystal symmetry environment of the qubit. The qubit would eventually lose its quantum properties in the presence of the magnetic noise produced by the random nuclear spin fluctuations in these materials, the process known as quantum decoherence.

Physics - Chemistry - 13.10.2016
Crystal Clear Imaging: Infrared Brings to Light Nanoscale Molecular Arrangement
Crystal Clear Imaging: Infrared Brings to Light Nanoscale Molecular Arrangement
Berkeley Lab and University of Colorado-Boulder team develop new way to reveal crystal features in functional materials. Detailing the molecular makeup of materials'from solar cells to organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and transistors, and medically important proteins'is not always a crystal-clear process.

Physics - Health - 13.10.2016
Peptides vs. superbugs
Peptides vs. superbugs
Several peptides have an antibacterial effect - but they are broken down in the human body too quickly to exert this effect. Empa researchers have now succeeded in encasing peptides in a protective coat, which could prolong their life in the human body. This is an important breakthrough because peptides are considered to be a possible solution in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 12.10.2016
Distant galaxies glow bright in oxygen
Distant galaxies glow bright in oxygen
Astronomers have cast light on how young galaxies ionise oxygen in the early Universe and its effects on the evolution of galaxies through time. Galaxies produce stars from cold gas, but some galaxies are more productive than others and their productivity changes across cosmic time. Overall, galaxies seem to have been the most productive 2-3 billion years after the Big Bang, with a consistent decline ever since.

Social Sciences - Physics - 12.10.2016
’Genius’ metaphors color perceptions of scientific discovery
Think of the word "genius," and a few images undoubtedly come to mind - perhaps a picture of Albert Einstein, of a scientist in a lab shouting 'Eureka!' or of present-day theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking. Whatever mental picture is conjured up, chances are they all have one thing in common: The person is male.