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Electroengineering - Physics - 12.10.2016
Electron-phonon interactions affect heat dissipation in computer chips
Electron-phonon interactions affect heat dissipation in computer chips
In the coming years, as more transistors are packed into ever smaller areas within computer chips, MIT engineers say cellphones, laptops, and other electronic devices may face a higher risk of overheating, as a result of interactions between electrons and heat-carrying particles called phonons. The researchers have found that these previously underestimated interactions can play a significant role in preventing heat dissipation in microelectronic devices.

Chemistry - Physics - 11.10.2016
New 3D design for mobile microbatteries
New 3D design for mobile microbatteries
In the race towards miniaturization, a French-US team—mostly involving researchers from the CNRS, Université de Lille, Université de Nantes and Argonne National Laboratory (US) as part of the Research Network on Electrochemical Energy Storage (RS2E) 1 —has succeeded in improving the energy density of a rechargeable battery without increasing its size (limited to a few square millimeters in mobile sensors).

Physics - Chemistry - 11.10.2016
"Weighing" atoms with electrons
uni:view magazin Videos Presse Social Media The chemical properties of atoms depend on the number of protons in their nuclei, placing them into the periodic table. However, even chemically identical atoms can have different masses - these variants are called isotopes. Although techniques to measure such mass differences exist, these have either not revealed where they are in a sample, or have required dedicated instrumentation and laborious sample preparation.

Physics - Chemistry - 10.10.2016
UCLA physicists demonstrate method to study atoms critical to medicine
UCLA physicists demonstrate method to study atoms critical to medicine
UCLA physicists have shown that shining multicolored laser light on rubidium atoms causes them to lose energy and cool to nearly absolute zero. This result suggests that atoms fundamental to chemistry, such as hydrogen and carbon, could also be cooled using similar lasers, an outcome that would allow researchers to study the details of chemical reactions involved in medicine.

Physics - Chemistry - 10.10.2016
Unprecedented observations of how a hot molecule cools in a liquid
Unprecedented observations of how a hot molecule cools in a liquid
The most detailed exploration to date of how energy flows from a hot molecule into a surrounding liquid has been undertaken by a team of scientists at the University of Bristol. Led by Professors Mike Ashfold and Andrew Orr-Ewing from the School of Chemistry , the research, published recently , has significant implications for a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of cooling and provides fresh insights into the extraordinarily complex behaviour of liquids.

Physics - Electroengineering - 10.10.2016
Quasiparticles in time-lapse
Quasiparticles in time-lapse
Research news When an electron moves in solid matter, it polarizes its environment. Detailed insight into the interactions between electrons and their environment is the key to better performing future electronics components. However, since these processes transpire within only a few attoseconds, in the past they were practically impossible to investigate.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 08.10.2016
Narrowing the window on sterile neutrinos
Narrowing the window on sterile neutrinos
A major international collaboration between the MINOS experiment, which involves UCL scientists, and the Daya Bay experiment has today announced results which shed new light on one of the most pressing questions in particle physics - do sterile neutrinos exist? Sterile neutrinos are a suggested fourth neutrino alongside the well-known electron, muon and tau neutrinos.

Chemistry - Physics - 07.10.2016
Lifting the veil on Queen of Sheba's perfume
Lifting the veil on Queen of Sheba’s perfume
It is one of the oldest fragrances in the world. Nicolas Baldovini's team at the Institut de chimie de Nice (CNRS/UNS) has just discovered the components that give frankincense its distinctive odor: two molecules found for the first time in nature, named “olibanic acids” by the scientists. Their research results have just been published online, on the website of the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition .

Health - Physics - 07.10.2016
KPE’s Dr. Andersen releases findings of new study regarding female bariatric patients
  Dr.  Ross Andersen , Professor in our Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education and Director of the McGill  Health and Fitness Promotion Laboratory , has authored a new paper on the subject of women who have undergone bariatric surgery. The paper specifically addresses barriers and motivators to adopting and maintaining regular physical activity among women with obesity who recently had bariatric surgery.  In March of 2015 Dr. Andersen's research suggested that low levels of physical activity following bariatric surgery may adversely affect long-term benefits.

Physics - 06.10.2016
Observing the Birth of Quasiparticles in Real Time
Observing the Birth of Quasiparticles in Real Time
The formation of quasiparticles, such as polarons, in a condensed-matter system usually proceeds in an extremely fast way and is very difficult to observe. In Innsbruck, Rudolf Grimm's physics research group, in collaboration with an international team of theoretical physicists, has simulated the formation of polarons in an ultracold quantum gas in real time.

Chemistry - Physics - 05.10.2016
UChicago site of radiocarbon dating discovery named historic landmark
Among the artifacts from the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute that Prof. Willard Libby tested during the radiocarbon dating development process was this wood from an ancient Egyptian coffin. The artifact, more than 2,000 years old, dates to the Egyptian Ptolemaic period. OI founder James Henry Breasted purchased the artifact, and many others, during his honeymoon trip to Egypt in 1894-95.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 04.10.2016
Bern-made laser altimeter taking off to Mercury
Bern-made laser altimeter taking off to Mercury
University of Bern's Laser Altimeter BELA has been successfully tested during the last weeks and the last components will be delivered to ESA on 5 October.

Physics - 04.10.2016
French-Japanese laboratory to study materials under extreme conditions
French-Japanese laboratory to study materials under extreme conditions
To strengthen their collaboration in materials science and engineering, the CNRS, Université de Lyon, and Tohoku University are launching an international joint unit (UMI) 1 based in Sendai, Japan, on October 4, 2016. Named Engineering Science Lyon – Tohoku for Materials and Systems under Extreme Conditions (ELyTMaX), this new laboratory studies the behavior of materials subject to extreme and complex stress.

Chemistry - Physics - 03.10.2016
Going beyond gold?
Experts from Cardiff University have proposed a much cheaper and more efficient way of producing a promising new catalyst that is used in reactions to produce a whole host of everyday materials, from electronics and cosmetics to sanitisation and pharmaceuticals. The team, from the Cardiff Catalysis Institute, have devised a new way of creating the catalyst graphitic oxide - a compound that is a pre-cursor to the 'wonder material' graphene - and shown how this can be effectively used in reactions to produce a widely used material called epoxide.

Physics - Electroengineering - 03.10.2016
Researchers bring theorized mechanism of conduction to life
Using recent innovations in 2-D materials, Stanford scientists realize a mechanism of conduction that could someday lead to new forms of energy conversion and higher-resolution scanning machines, such as those used in airports and quality control for manufacturing. Humans have harnessed large portions of the electromagnetic spectrum for diverse technologies, from X-rays to radios, but a chunk of that spectrum has remained largely out of reach.

Physics - Life Sciences - 29.09.2016
Cellular test of strength
Cellular test of strength
Biological cells can expand, contract and interact with neighbouring cells. With an advancement in a microscopy technique, ETH Zurich researchers can now readily, directly, and accurately determine which forces are at work during cell motion and where. The technique is used in areas such as cancer research.

Physics - Chemistry - 29.09.2016
Microscope developed at MBL tracks individual molecules in living cells
Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory and colleagues have unveiled a new microscope that can track the position and orientation of individual molecules in living cells?nanoscale measurements that until now have posed a significant challenge. As reported this week in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences , the team's 'instantaneous fluorescence polarization' microscope offers new insights into how cells achieve directed functions or forces.

Chemistry - Physics - 27.09.2016
Researchers uncover the skin barrier
Researchers uncover the skin barrier
The PSI synchrotron radiation facility in Switzerland. To the left is the beamline that sends out the X-rays. The sample is attached to the small copper plate slightly to the right, and in the right-hand corner is the detector. PHOTO: Jenny Andersson Researchers at the Faculty of Science at Lund University in Sweden can now explain how the properties of the skin change depending on the environment.

Physics - Electroengineering - 27.09.2016
First quantum photonic circuit with electrically driven light source
First quantum photonic circuit with electrically driven light source
Optical quantum computers are what people are pinning their hopes on for tomorrow's computer technology - whether for tap-proof data encryption, ultrafast calculations involving enormous quantities of data or so-called quantum simulation, which allows highly complex systems to be reproduced on the computer.

Physics - Health - 26.09.2016
Moderate activity helps older adults maintain mobility and independence
By adopting a walking routine and other moderate physical activities, older adults can recover from a major disability more quickly, and maintain their independence over time, according to a new Yale-led study. The study results, published Sept. 26 by the Annals of Internal Medicine, are drawn from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study - the largest and longest trial of physical activity in older people.