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Religions - 19.12.2016
Eighteenth Century monks' favourite tipple
Eighteenth Century monks’ favourite tipple
Two Eighteenth Century drinks recipes, discovered by researchers from Durham University's Department of Theology and Religion , have revealed that a brandy-based cocktail was a favourite drink amongst a community of English Catholic monks exiled in France. The recipes were discovered by Dr James Kelly , Research Fellow in Early Modern British and Irish Catholicism, during research work for the Monks in Motion project.

Politics - Religions - 22.09.2016
Europeans favor high-skilled, vulnerable and Christian asylum seekers
Europeans favor high-skilled, vulnerable and Christian asylum seekers
Dominik Hangartner from UZH's Department of Political Science and the London School of Economics and Political Science teamed up with colleagues from Stanford University (USA) to compile 180,000 fict

Health - Religions - 09.09.2016
European region most sceptical in the world on vaccine safety
European region most sceptical in the world on vaccine safety
Europe named as the most sceptical region on vaccine safety in the world, according to the largest ever global survey of vaccine confidence. Researchers from Imperial College London and their collaborators surveyed nearly 66,000 people from 67 countries to explore their views on whether vaccines are important, safe, effective, and compatible with their religious beliefs.

Religions - Politics - 12.07.2016
"Thinking Arab revolutions" by Makram Abbès
The las issue of Astérion , published by ENS Editions , is about "Thinking Arab revolutions". Makram Abbès , of the ENS de Lyon, researcher at Triangle , coordinated this issue #14.

Health - Religions - 13.05.2016
Is church a stairway to heaven?
Churches are good for the health of Christians but less therapeutic for atheists. This is a key finding of a recent study by Professor Alex Haslam of The University of Queensland School of Psychology and colleagues at Carleton University, Canada, and the University of Exeter, UK. "We looked at Christians' and atheists' self-esteem and self-reported physical health when immersed in a cathedral rather than in other environments," Professor Haslam said.

Health - Religions - 13.05.2016
Is church a stairway to heaven or hell?
Churches are good for the health of Christians but are less therapeutic for atheists. This is a key finding of a recent study by Professor Alex Haslam of The University of Queensland School of Psychology and colleagues at Carleton University, Canada, and the University of Exeter, UK. "We looked at Christians' and atheists' self-esteem and self-reported physical health when immersed in a cathedral rather than in other environments," Professor Haslam said.

Health - Religions - 27.04.2016
Faith-based health promotion program successful with older Latinas, study finds
Faith-based health promotion program successful with older Latinas, study finds
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — A culturally sensitive lifestyle intervention showed promise at motivating Latinas living in the U.S. to eat better and exercise more by connecting healthy-living behaviors with the lives of saints and prominent religious figures, new studies found.

Religions - Psychology - 17.03.2016
Stanford expert offers approach to thwarting radicalization of Muslim immigrants in the U.S
Telling Muslims they are not welcome in the United States reinforces the narrative that the West is anti-Islam, a Stanford scholar says. Immigrants fare better when they receive opportunities to integrate their original cultural identities with their new ones. A more inclusive approach toward Muslims could help reduce the growth of homegrown radicalism, new Stanford research shows.

Religions - Health - 14.03.2016
When performers are in the zone, it’s spiritual, researcher finds
Prima ballerinas Anna Pavlova and Margot Fonteyn reported entering altered states of consciousness and having "spiritual" experiences during performance, a University of Queensland researcher says. Master of Arts (Studies in Religion) graduate Lynda Flower said her research aimed to gain an in-depth understanding of "peak performance lived experiences" and the meaning people made of them.

Religions - Social Sciences - 10.03.2016
American devotion to religion is waning, according to new study
American devotion to religion is waning, according to new study
Religion in the United States is declining and mirroring patterns found across the western world, according to new research from UCL and Duke University in the United States. The study published in the American Journal of Sociology shows a drop in the number of Americans who claim religious affiliations, attend church regularly and believe in God.