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Life Sciences - Health - 11.12.2017
Scientists successfully demonstrate a new way to help nerve regeneration in spinal cord injury
Scientists successfully demonstrate a new way to help nerve regeneration in spinal cord injury
A new way of triggering nerve regeneration to help repair spinal cord injury and in the longer-term potentially paralysis has successfully been demonstrated by University of Bristol scientists. The work is published in PLOS ONE today [Monday 11 December]. There is currently no cure for spinal cord injury or treatment to help nerve regeneration so therapies offering intervention are limited.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.12.2017
Novartis drug crizanlizumab shown to prolong time to patients’ first sickle cell pain crisis in subgroup analysis of SUSTAIN study
Investigational therapy crizanlizumab (SEG101, formerly SelG1) approximately doubled the time to first on-treatment sickle cell pain crisis, according to new subgroup analysis of Phase II SUSTAIN data Results were consistent across patient subgroups despite differences in disease severity, genotype or background therapy New findings for crizanlizumab, a potential disease-modifying, preventive treatment option for patients with sickle cell diseas

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2017
Hormone discovery marks breakthough in understanding fertility
Scientists at The University of Nottingham have shown, for the first time, that a naturally occurring hormone plays a vital part in regulating a woman's fertility, a discovery that could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of infertility. Research by Associate Professor Ravinder Anand-Ivell , Professor Richard Ivell and Yanzhenzi Dai in the School of Biosciences has been published in the online journal Frontiers in Physiology.

Environment - 11.12.2017
Presenting facts as 'consensus' bridges conservative-liberal divide over climate change
Presenting facts as ’consensus’ bridges conservative-liberal divide over climate change
New evidence shows that 'social fact' highlighting expert consensus shifts perceptions across US political spectrum - particularly among highly educated conservatives. Facts that encourage agreement are a promising way of cutting through today's 'post-truth' bluster, say psychologists. Even in our so-called post-truth environment, hope is not lost for the fact Sander van der Linden In the murk of post-truth public debate, facts can polarise.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2017
Twitter can reveal our shared mood
Twitter can reveal our shared mood
In the largest study of its kind, researchers from the University of Bristol have analysed mood indicators in text from 800 million anonymous messages posted on Twitter. These tweets were found to reflect strong patterns of positive and negative moods over the 24-hour day. Circadian rhythms, widely referred to as the ‘body clock', allows people's bodies to predict their needs over the dark and light periods of the day.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.12.2017
Blood flow-sensing protein protects against atherosclerosis in mice
Blood flow-sensing protein protects against atherosclerosis in mice
FINDINGS UCLA scientists have found that a protein known as NOTCH1 helps ward off inflammation in the walls of blood vessels, preventing atherosclerosis — the narrowing and hardening of arteries that can cause heart attacks and strokes. The new finding , from research conducted on mice, also explains why areas of smooth, fast blood flow are less prone to inflammation: levels of NOTCH1 are higher in these vessels.

Art and Design - Chemistry - 11.12.2017
Scientists from UCLA, National Gallery of Art pioneer new way to analyze ancient artwork
'Macroscale multimodal chemical imaging' reveals details about second century Egyptian painting Matthew Chin Scientists from UCLA and the National Gallery of Art have used a combination of three advanced imaging techniques to produce a highly detailed analysis of a second century Egyptian painting. They are the first to use the specific combination — which they termed “macroscale multimodal chemical imaging? — to examine an ancient work of art.

Health - 11.12.2017
"Death receptors" - new markers for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have found that the presence of death receptors in the blood can be used to directly measure the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. "We see that people with known risk factors such as high blood sugar and high blood fats also have heightened death receptor levels", says Professor Jan Nilsson who led the study.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 11.12.2017
Over 50s with fewer teeth at risk of frailty
Over 50s with fewer than 20 teeth at higher risk of musculoskeletal frailty New research by scientists at King's College London has found that tooth loss may contribute to musculoskeletal frailty in the over 50s, with those with fewer than 20 teeth being at greatest risk. Published in Geriatrics & Gerontology International on 11 December, the research led by Dr Wael Sabbah, from King's College London Dental Institute, examined the overall health of 9,338 Americans aged 50 years and older.

Health - Social Sciences - 11.12.2017
Babies born during famine have lower cognition in midlife
ANN ARBOR-Hunger and malnutrition in infancy may lead to poor cognitive performance in midlife, according to a new study. Researchers at University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Columbia University have found that child survivors of China's 1959-61 famine that killed millions appear to be haunted by their past, as their cognitive performances go downhill in their early 50s.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 11.12.2017
Decades of increased burning deplete soil carbon
Long-term effects of repeated fires on soils found to have significant impacts on carbon storage not previously considered in global greenhouse gas estimates. Frequent burning over decades reduces the amount of carbon and nitrogen stored in soils of savanna grasslands and broadleaf forests, in part because reduced plant growth means less carbon being drawn out of the atmosphere and stored in plant matter.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.12.2017
Deep brain waves occur more often during navigation and memory formation
Deep brain waves occur more often during navigation and memory formation
FINDINGS UCLA neuroscientists are the first to show that rhythmic waves in the brain called theta oscillations happen more often when someone is navigating an unfamiliar environment, and that the more quickly a person moves, the more theta oscillations take place — presumably to process incoming information faster.

Environment - 11.12.2017
Cascade utilisation is also positive for wood
Cascade utilisation is also positive for wood
Research news Another ten years - that is approximately how long sustainable forestry will be able to satisfy the continuously growing demand for wood. In Germany and Europe, new concepts are therefore being discussed for more responsible and efficient industrial use of the renewable, but still limited wood resources.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.12.2017
Identifies how 3D printed metals can be both strong and ductile
Less than one per cent of UK children born with congenital heart disease are enrolled in clinical trials looking to improve treatments, research funded by the British Heart Foundation and led by the University of Birmingham and Birmingham Children's Hospital has found. The study, published in the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery today, is the first systematic review of its kind into clinical trials in children's heart surgery.

Environment - 11.12.2017
UCL indexes natural disasters
Research UCL - 10 December, International Climate Day - press release 2017: fewer disasters but more cost damages, reports researchers of University of Louvain (UCL) EMDAT is an international referen

Environment - Continuing Education - 11.12.2017
Education and Research on the Sustainable Use of Resources with Biochar
Deutsche Bundesstiftung funds research project BodenBildungBerlin at Freie Universität No 339/2017 from Dec 11, 2017 As part of the "BodenBildungBerlin" research project, scientists from Freie Universität Berlin are investigating how biochar can be used to reduce the burden on the environment. They are developing methods for imparting skills and knowledge on the sustainable use of resources in training and continuing education.

Physics - Life Sciences - 11.12.2017
Clothes make the woman: less empathy towards women showing more skin
Clothes make the woman: less empathy towards women showing more skin
Sexualized representations, especially the emphasis of secondary sexual characteristics, can change the way we perceive an individual. An international team of researchers led by Giorgia Silani from the Faculty of Psychology at the University of Vienna has shown that empathic feelings and brain responses are reduced when we observe the emotions of sexualized women.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.12.2017
Liver Cancer: Lipid Synthesis Promotes Tumor Formation
Liver Cancer: Lipid Synthesis Promotes Tumor Formation
Lipid, also known as fat, is an optimal energy source and an important cell component. Much is required for the rapid and uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and from the University of Geneva have now discovered that the protein mTOR stimulates the production of lipids in liver tumors to satisfy the increased nutrient turnover and energy needs of cancer cells among other functions.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 11.12.2017
Reductions in individual plant growth sometimes boost community resilience
ANN ARBOR-In sports, sometimes a player has to take one for the team. The same appears to be true in the plant world, where reduced individual growth can benefit the broader community. The findings from the University of Michigan's Paul Glaum and André Kessler of Cornell University help explain the persistence of some plant communities when theory predicts they should go extinct.

Psychology - History / Archeology - 10.12.2017
Industrial Revolution left a damaging psychological ’imprint’ on today’s populations
Study finds people in areas historically reliant on coal-based industries have more 'negative' personality traits. Psychologists suggest this cognitive die may well have been cast at the dawn of the industrial age.
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