news 2017


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Results 3161 - 3180 of 3192.


Law - 06.01.2017
Brixton Road becomes first place in London to breach Nitrogen dioxide limits
Data from King's College London's Environmental Research Group has shown Brixton Road has become the first place in London to breach objectives for nitrogen dioxide for 2017. UK objectives and EU limits stipulate a maximum nitrogen dioxide concentration that must not to be exceeded for more than 18 hours over the whole year.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.01.2017
Bacteria resists 'last-resort' antibiotic
Bacteria resists ’last-resort’ antibiotic
An international research team, led by the University of Bristol, has provided the first clues to understand how the mcr-1 gene protects bacteria from colistin - a ‘last resort' antibiotic used to treat life-threatening bacterial infections that do not respond to other treatment options.

Health - Administration - 06.01.2017
Risk of long-term disability in older adults who visit the ED
Risk of long-term disability in older adults who visit the ED
Older adults who go to the emergency department (ED) for an illness or injury are at increased risk for disability and decline in physical abilities up to six months later, according to a study by Yale researchers. The study was published on Jan. 6, 2017, in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. Most adults aged 65 and older who visit the emergency department each year are treated and sent home.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.01.2017
How ancestry shapes our immune cells
How ancestry shapes our immune cells
A genetic variant that is particularly prevalent in people of African ancestry confers protection against malaria. LMU researchers have now shown how it modulates the properties of white blood cells that play a major role in immune defenses and inflammation. Virtually the entire population of sub-Saharan Africa, and some 70% of African Americans, carry a gene variant (allele) which results in a trait referred to as Duffy-negative.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.01.2017
Bacteria deployed to destroy mosquito-borne dengue can’t take the heat
A promising strain of bacteria that stops dengue transmission in mosquitoes struggles to survive hot conditions, new research from the University of Melbourne has revealed. But there is a silver lining, because researchers now know which particular strains will survive the steamy tropics, where disease-bearing mosquitoes thrive.

Economics / Business - Health - 05.01.2017
Job clubs could help reduce depression in people through unemployment
Job clubs could help reduce depression in people through unemployment
Job clubs could be effective in reducing depression in people experiencing the effects of unemployment, particularly those at high risk of depression, an NIHR-funded study has found. Many people feeling depressed and anxious because of financial hardship do not seek help from their GP.

Health - 05.01.2017
Older lung cancer patients face significant treatment burden
Older lung cancer patients face significant treatment burden
Depending on the type of treatment older lung cancer patients receive, they can spend an average of one in three days interacting with the healthcare system in the first 60 days after surgery or radiation therapy, according to a study by Yale researchers. The findings are published in current issue of Journal of Oncology Practice.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.01.2017
Development of face recognition entails brain tissue growth
Development of face recognition entails brain tissue growth
A central tenet in neuroscience has been that the amount of brain tissue goes in one direction throughout our lives - from too much to just enough. A new study finds that in some cases the brain can add tissue as well. People are born with brains riddled with excess neural connections. Those are slowly pruned back until early childhood when, scientists thought, the brain's structure becomes relatively stable.

Chemistry - 05.01.2017
South American fossil tomatillos show nightshades evolved earlier than thought
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Delicate fossil remains of tomatillos found in Patagonia, Argentina, show that this branch of the economically important family that also includes potatoes, peppers, tobacco, petunias and tomatoes existed 52 million years ago, long before the dates previously ascribed to these species, according to an international team of scientists.

Life Sciences - 05.01.2017
From Sight to Recognition: Researchers Map How the Brain Processes Faces
By Shilo Rea Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are getting closer to understanding how your brain perceives faces and recognizes old friends you haven't seen in years. In a study published in the Dec. 26, 2016, issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), scientists used highly sophisticated brain imaging tools and computational methods to measure the real-time brain processes that convert the appearance of a face into the recognition of an individual.

Health - 05.01.2017
Lung cancer patients may benefit from delayed chemotherapy after surgery
Lung cancer patients may benefit from delayed chemotherapy after surgery
A new Yale study suggests that patients with a common form of lung cancer may still benefit from delayed chemotherapy started up to four months after surgery, according to the researchers. The study was published online by JAMA Oncology on Jan. 5, 2017. Each year, more people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.01.2017
‘Molecular volume control’ may help combat tumours
A ‘molecular volume control' may one day be used to manipulate enzyme activity in order control the development and treatment of cancer, according to research at the Universities of Dundee and Bath. The researchers have uncovered new functions of an enzyme called Dual-specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5), which will help scientists to better understand how tumours develop.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 05.01.2017
Issues of indigenous peoples examined in current IK journal
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. The Interinstitutional Center for Indigenous Knowledge (ICIK) and the Penn State University Libraries - latest volume of its peer-reviewed, open access journal, IK: Other Ways of Knowing , examines current issues facing indigenous persons and peoples.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.01.2017
Genetics play a significant role in immunity
Nearly three quarters of immune traits are influenced by genes, new research from King's reveals. The study published today , adds to a growing body of evidence that the genetic influence on our immune system is significantly higher than previously thought. Researchers from King's, supported by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and St Thomas' Foundation Trust and King's College London, analysed 23,000 immune traits in 497 adult female twins from the TwinsUK cohort.

Physics - Psychology - 05.01.2017
Physical activity, even in small amounts, benefits both physical and psychological well-being
Physical activity, even in small amounts, benefits both physical and psychological well-being
The largest-ever smartphone-based study examining the relationship between physical activity and happiness has found that even minimal levels of activity can have a positive effect on happiness. In order to be happier, you don't have to go out and run a marathon. Jason Rentfrow A new study, based on reports from more than 10,000 individuals, has found that physical activity, whether or not it is classified as exercise, can have a positive effect on emotional well-being.

Chemistry - Physics - 05.01.2017
Nanotechnology enables new insights into chemical reactions
Nanotechnology enables new insights into chemical reactions
Eighty percent of all products of the chemical industry are manufactured with catalytic processes. Catalysis is also indispensable in energy conversion and treatment of exhaust gases. It is important for these processes to run as quickly and efficiently as possible; that protects the environment while also saving time and conserving resources.

Environment - Mathematics - 04.01.2017
Large-scale tornado outbreaks increasing in frequency, study finds
The frequency of large-scale tornado outbreaks is increasing in the United States, particularly when it comes to the most extreme events, according to research recently published in Science . The study by researchers including Joel E. Cohen, a visiting scholar at the University of Chicago, finds the increase in tornado outbreaks does not appear to be the result of a warming climate as earlier models suggested.

Astronomy / Space Science - 04.01.2017
Fast radio burst tied to distant dwarf galaxy and, perhaps, magnetar
Fast radio burst tied to distant dwarf galaxy and, perhaps, magnetar
One of the rare and brief bursts of cosmic radio waves that have puzzled astronomers since they were first detected nearly 10 years ago has finally been tied to a source: an older dwarf galaxy more than 3 billion light years from Earth. Fast radio bursts, which flash for just a few milliseconds, created a stir among astronomers because they seemed to be coming from outside our galaxy, which means they would have to be very powerful to be seen from Earth, and because none of those first observed were ever seen again.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.01.2017
New technique uses immune cells to deliver anti-cancer drugs
Artist's conception of nanoparticle-carrying immune cells that target tumors and release drug-loaded nanoparticles for cancer treatment. UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa - Some researchers are working to discover new, safer ways to deliver cancer-fighting drugs to tumors without damaging healthy cells. Others are finding ways to boost the body's own immune system to attack cancer cells.

Electroengineering - Physics - 04.01.2017
Beam me up, Scotty – build a portable acoustic tractor beam at home for less than 70
Beam me up, Scotty – build a portable acoustic tractor beam at home for less than 70
A team of researchers from the University of Bristol have shown it's possible to create a simplified tractor beam using readily available parts with a total cost of less than 70. Tractor beams are mysterious rays that can grab and attract objects. The concept has been shown in science-fiction movies such as Star Wars or Star Trek and scientists have developed the theory using lasers.

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