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Results 41 - 60 of 3180.


Physics - 20.12.2017

Health - Veterinary Science - 20.12.2017
Feasibility of Eliminating Rabies in Africa
Feasibility of Eliminating Rabies in Africa
The Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, together with European and African collaborators, carried out a mass dog vaccination in Chad and determined its effect on human rabies exposure. The study employed a bio-mathematical method for estimating the transmission dynamics of rabies. The researchers conclude that with political will and the necessary funding, elimination of rabies is possible in Africa.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 20.12.2017
Mars: Not as dry as it seems
Image shows modern Mars (left) dry and barren, compared with the same scene over 3.5 billion years ago covered in water (right). The rocks of the surface were slowly reacting with the water, sequestering it into the Martian mantle leading to the dry, inhospitable scene shown on the left. Image credit: Jon Wade When searching for life, scientists first look for an element key to sustaining it: fresh water.

Environment - Politics - 20.12.2017
Political instability and weak governance lead to loss of species, study finds
Political instability and weak governance lead to loss of species, study finds
Big data study of global biodiversity shows ineffective national governance is a better indicator of species decline than any other measure of "anthropogenic impact". Even protected conservation areas make little difference in countries that struggle with socio-political stability.

Environment - Administration - 20.12.2017
Wildlife conservation needs effective governance more than GDP or space
Wildlife conservation needs effective governance more than GDP or space
Protecting an area for wildlife can work-but only if there is robust political governance. That's the research conclusion of twenty-three years of bird counting by an international team of researchers, including a scientist from the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath and published in the journal Nature .

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 20.12.2017
Cosmic Filament Probes Our Galaxy's Giant Black Hole
Cosmic Filament Probes Our Galaxy’s Giant Black Hole
The center of our Galaxy has been intensely studied for many years, but it still harbors surprises for scientists. A snake-like structure lurking near our galaxy's supermassive black hole is the latest discovery to tantalize astronomers. In 2016, Farhad Yusef-Zadeh of Northwestern University reported the discovery of an unusual filament near the center of the Milky Way Galaxy using the NSF's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA).

Earth Sciences - Innovation - 20.12.2017
Modeling the Effects of Wastewater Injection
Modeling the Effects of Wastewater Injection
Earth scientists develop a model to estimate the largest possible quake in a given location that could be caused by the disposal of water used in hydraulic fracturing In work that offers insight into the magnitude of the hazards posed by earthquake faults in general, seismologists have developed a model to determine the size of an earthquake that could be triggered by the underground injection of fluids produced as a by-product of hydraulic fracturing.

Social Sciences - Career - 20.12.2017
Five Chicago sports franchises partner with UChicago Crime Lab to address violence
For the first time, five of Chicago's professional sports teams are joining together to work on a vital social issue, lending their broad reach and resources in support of solutions to decrease violence in the city. The Chicago Bears, Chicago Blackhawks, Chicago Bulls, Chicago Cubs and Chicago White Sox, operating collectively as the Chicago Sports Alliance, today announced they will be donating a total of $1 million in one-time grants to support three programs addressing this critical issue.

Physics - 20.12.2017
New technique allows rapid screening for new types of solar cells
New technique allows rapid screening for new types of solar cells
The worldwide quest by researchers to find better, more efficient materials for tomorrow's solar panels is usually slow and painstaking. Researchers typically must produce lab samples - which are often composed of multiple layers of different materials bonded together - for extensive testing. Now, a team at MIT and other institutions has come up with a way to bypass such expensive and time-consuming fabrication and testing, allowing for a rapid screening of far more variations than would be practical through the traditional approach.

Health - 20.12.2017
New software can model natural light from the occupants' perspective
New software can model natural light from the occupants' perspective
OCUVIS, a visualization software developed by a soon-to-be-launched EPFL spin-off, lets architects simulate 3D building models to assess the performance of natural light indoors. After specifying the ambient conditions, architects can view the visual and non-visual characteristics of the resulting natural light in their designs.

Mathematics - Innovation - 20.12.2017
A ’STEM’ parent boosts girls’ participation in science degrees
ANN ARBOR-Even when girls perform just as well as boys on standardized math tests, they are half as likely to major in science at college. However, having one parent or guardian work in the STEM (science, technology, engineering or math) field makes it more likely for girls to perform better in math and to enroll in a "hard sciences" college degree in programs such as engineering, architecture, math and computer science.

Life Sciences - 20.12.2017
How Plants Form Their Seeds
How Plants Form Their Seeds
Around 80 to 85 percent of our calorie needs is covered through seeds, either directly as food or indirectly through use as feed.

Environment - Civil Engineering - 20.12.2017
Installing rooftop vegetable gardens for sustainable cities
Installing rooftop vegetable gardens for sustainable cities
From producing food to regulating water runoff, urban agriculture has a lot to offer. Scientists from INRA and AgroParisTech have shown that rooftop vegetable gardens are an interesting way to recycle urban waste, produce food, and retain rainwater. Their The challenges of making today's cities more sustainable are legion: waste management, food supplies, sensitivity to heatwaves and the risk of flooding linked notably to the impermeabilisation of soils.

Health - Veterinary Science - 20.12.2017
Feasibility of Eliminating Rabies in Africa
Feasibility of Eliminating Rabies in Africa
The Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, together with European and African collaborators, carried out a mass dog vaccination in Chad and determined its effect on human rabies exposure. The study employed a bio-mathematical method for estimating the transmission dynamics of rabies. The researchers conclude that with political will and the necessary funding, elimination of rabies is possible in Africa.

Earth Sciences - 20.12.2017
Suggests that alcohol consumption contributes to self-blame in rape cases
Ambulance response times in London worsen when air temperatures rise or fall beyond certain limits in summer and winter, according to a new study. Current daily estimates at the London Ambulance Service (LAS) of vehicles likely to be required in the week ahead are based on statistics for the same days of the year over the last three years.

Computer Science / Telecom - Electroengineering - 20.12.2017
Memristors power quick-learning neural network
Memristors power quick-learning neural network
ANN ARBOR-A new type of neural network made with memristors can dramatically improve the efficiency of teaching machines to think like humans. The network, called a reservoir computing system, could predict words before they are said during conversation, and help predict future outcomes based on the present.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 20.12.2017
Origins of photosynthesis in plants dated to 1.25 billion years ago
The world's oldest algae fossils are a billion years old, according to a new analysis by earth scientists at McGill University. Based on this finding, the researchers also estimate that theábasis for photosynthesis in today's plants was set in place 1.25 billion years ago. The study, published in the journal Geology , could resolve a long-standing mystery over the age of the fossilized algae, Bangiomorpha pubescens , which were first discovered in rocks in Arctic Canada in 1990.

Physics - Health - 19.12.2017
Early disease diagnosis could be dramatically improved with new detection system
Early disease diagnosis could be dramatically improved with new detection system
By attaching specialised molecules to the backbone of DNA, researchers have made it easier to detect rare molecules associated with early disease. The presence of, or changes in the concentration of, certain proteins in biological fluids can be indicators of disease. However, in the early stages of disease these ‘biomarkers' can be difficult to detect, as they are relatively rare.

Environment - 19.12.2017
Untouched forests fight climate change, but face threats
Untouched forests fight climate change, but face threats
The world's rainforests take up extra carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, but their ability to do so is threatened by drought and fragmentation. Human activities pump extra carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, but only around half of it stays there. The oceans and forests of the world are known to be carbon ‘sinks', absorbing much of the excess atmospheric carbon.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2017
Could deer hold clues about the link between malaria resistance and sickle cell?
Could deer hold clues about the link between malaria resistance and sickle cell?
Scientists have identified the genetic mutations that cause sickle cells in deer, according to new research Ecology & Evolution. The scientists from Imperial College London say although their research is in its early stages, it shows promise that certain species of deer might potentially be a surprising model in which to study the effects of sickling in humans such as resistance to malaria.

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