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Results 81 - 100 of 3180.


Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 18.12.2017
Birds learn from each other's 'disgust', enabling insects to evolve bright colours
Birds learn from each other’s ’disgust’, enabling insects to evolve bright colours
A new study of TV-watching great tits reveals how they learn through observation. Social interactions within a predator species can have "evolutionary consequences" for potential prey - such as the conspicuous warning colours of insects like ladybirds. We suspect our findings apply over a wide range of predators and prey.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 18.12.2017
Engineers: Bone Marrow Transplant Stem Cells Can 'Swim' Upstream
Engineers: Bone Marrow Transplant Stem Cells Can ’Swim’ Upstream
When a cancer patient receives a bone marrow transplant, time is of the essence. Healthy stem cells, which can restart the production of blood cells and immune system components after a patient's own are compromised, need to make their way from the circulatory system into the bones as quickly as possible.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 18.12.2017
Oldest fossils ever found show life on Earth began before 3.5 billion years ago
Geoscience Professor John Valley, left, and research scientist Kouki Kitajima collaborate in the Wisconsin Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer Lab (WiscSIMS) in Weeks Hall. Photo: Jeff Miller Researchers at UCLA and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have confirmed that microscopic fossils discovered in a nearly 3.5 billion-year-old piece of rock in Western Australia are the oldest fossils ever found and indeed the earliest direct evidence of life on Earth.

Life Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 18.12.2017
Ancient fossil microorganisms indicate that life in the universe is common
Ancient fossil microorganisms indicate that life in the universe is common
A new analysis of the oldest known fossil microorganisms provides strong evidence to support an increasingly widespread understanding that life in the universe is common. The microorganisms, from Western Australia, are 3.465 billion years old.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.12.2017
Dementia with Lewy bodies: unique genetic profile identified
Dementia with Lewy bodies: unique genetic profile identified
Dementia with Lewy bodies has a unique genetic profile, distinct from those of Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease, according to the first large-scale genetic study of this common type of dementia which was led by UCL. The genome-wide association study, conducted by a UCL-led collaboration of 65 academics in 11 countries and funded by Alzheimer's Society and the Lewy Body Society, is published today in The Lancet Neurology .

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 18.12.2017
Genetic changes caused by environmental factors linked to suicide risk
Researchers have linked genetic changes in the so-called CRH gene, which affects the regulation of the body's stress system, to suicide risk and psychiatric illness. The study of epigenetic changes in the body's hormone-based stress system has shown that stress-related changes in the CRH gene are linked to both serious suicide attempts in adults and psychiatric illness in adolescents.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 18.12.2017
Star Mergers: A New Test of Gravity, Dark Energy Theories
Star Mergers: A New Test of Gravity, Dark Energy Theories
When scientists recorded a rippling in space-time, followed within two seconds by an associated burst of light observed by dozens of telescopes around the globe, they had witnessed, for the first time, the explosive collision and merger of two neutron stars. The intense cosmological event observed on Aug.

Health - Psychology - 18.12.2017
Could cognitive interventions be useful in treating depression?
Could cognitive interventions be useful in treating depression?
A new study by experimental psychologists from the University of Bristol has examined whether cognitive bias modification (CBM) for facial interpretation, a digital health intervention that changes our perception for emotional expressions from negative to positive, might be useful in treating depression.

History / Archeology - Business / Economics - 18.12.2017
Calf's foot jelly and a tankard of ale? Welcome to the 18th century Starbucks
Calf’s foot jelly and a tankard of ale? Welcome to the 18th century Starbucks
Researchers have published details of the largest collection of artefacts from an early English coffeehouse ever discovered. Described as an 18th century equivalent of Starbucks, the finds nonetheless suggest that it may have been less like a café, and more like an inn. Coffee houses were important social centres during the 18th century.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 18.12.2017
Researchers ID Plant ’Sunscreen’ Protein
For plants, light is great, until it's not. They need the sun's energy to carry out photosynthesis, but too much light damages the chloroplasts in plant cells where light, water, and carbon dioxide are converted into sugar and oxygen. One way plants protect themselves is to dissipate that excess light, a process that also occurs in the chloroplasts.

Physics - 18.12.2017
Error-free into the Quantum Computer Age
Error-free into the Quantum Computer Age
A study carried out by an international team of researchers and published in the journal Physical Review X shows that ion-trap technologies available today are suitable for building large-scale quantum computers. The scientists introduce trapped-ion quantum error correction protocols that detect and correct processing errors.

Civil Engineering - 18.12.2017
The Inflatable Bridge
The Inflatable Bridge
A wildlife crossing over the upcoming Koralm railway is being built, using a new construction technique developed by TU Wien. Traditional support structures are replaced by an air cushion. The shell construction methods which are usually used to build bridges and domes generally rely on expensive support structures.

- 16.12.2017
Linking turnover to organizational performance: the role of process conformance
Inleiding: Jan Wynen, Wouter Van Dooren, Jan Mattijs and Carl Deschamps investigated the optimal rate of turnover for organizational performance and the role for process conformance. The article 'Linking turnover to organizational performance: the role of process conformance' is published Open Access.

Health - Administration - 15.12.2017
Screening could catch a quarter of hip fractures before they happen
Screening could catch a quarter of hip fractures before they happen
Community screening for osteoporosis could prevent more than a quarter of hip fractures in older women - according to new research involving researchers from the Centre for Academic Primary Care, University of Bristol and local hospitals, and led by the University of East Anglia (UEA). The study, published today in The Lancet, reveals that a simple questionnaire, combined with bone mineral density measurements for some, would help identify those at risk of hip fracture.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.12.2017
Understanding the Neural Mechanisms of Sleep
Understanding the Neural Mechanisms of Sleep
Sleep is a crucial behavior for a properly functioning mind and body-just ask anyone who has experienced a sleepless night. But the complex neural mechanisms underlying sleep are only just beginning to be explored. As part of this exploration, neurobiologists like Caltech professor of biology David Prober aim to build up a catalog of genes that regulate sleep.

Health - Administration - 15.12.2017
Opportunities to vaccinate young women against HPV missed at alarming rate
Two-thirds of young women aged 18-26 who were eligible to receive Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine have missed at least one opportunity to receive the vaccine during a visit to an obstetrics and gynecology clinic, Yale researchers report. This study also confirms previous research showing racial disparities in vaccination for HPV: Women who identify as black are 61% more likely have had a missed opportunity than women who identify as white.

Administration - 15.12.2017
Could a new app help cure loneliness?
Could a new app help cure loneliness?
Researchers from Lancaster University are exploring whether technology could be the key to tackling the UK's loneliness epidemic by better connecting older adults with their communities. Ironically, isolation and loneliness have spread rapidly as communication has become easier - particularly among older adults.

Life Sciences - Environment - 15.12.2017
Salmon help their offspring by dying on the spawning grounds
Salmon help their offspring by dying on the spawning grounds
Spawning salmon that die after migrating home actually do their offspring a favour. The study, published today in Ecology Letters, found that by dying, the decaying bodies of the salmon fertilise the stream and create an environment which favours the growth of the young fish and maintains their genetic diversity.

History / Archeology - Health - 15.12.2017
Ancient faeces reveal parasites described in earliest Greek medical texts
Ancient faeces reveal parasites described in earliest Greek medical texts
Earliest archaeological evidence of intestinal parasitic worms infecting the ancient inhabitants of Greece confirms descriptions found in writings associated with Hippocrates, the early physician and 'father of Western medicine'.

Physics - Life Sciences - 15.12.2017
10 best Sydney science discoveries 2017
From squirtable surgical glue to gravitational waves, University of Sydney scientists have been hitting the headlines in 2017. 1. Squirtable surgical glue Biomedical engineers at the University of Sydney working with scientists in Boston, USA, developed potentially life-saving glue. Named MeTro, the revolutionary product sets in just 60 seconds once treated with UV light.

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