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Earth Sciences



Results 81 - 100 of 157.


Environment - Earth Sciences - 05.07.2017
Habitat loss a critical threat in mammal extinction
Habitat loss a critical threat in mammal extinction
Researchers have long assumed habitat fragmentation contributes to animal extinction risk, but until now, they have not been able to measure it on a global scale for a major group of animals. In a first-of-its-kind study , a research team led by Colorado State University (CSU), and involving research from The University of Queensland, successfully measured habitat fragmentation for more than 4000 species of land-dwelling mammals.

Earth Sciences - Civil Engineering - 03.07.2017
New Studies of Ancient Concrete Could Teach Us to Do as the Romans Did
New Studies of Ancient Concrete Could Teach Us to Do as the Romans Did
?By Glenn Roberts Jr. A new look inside 2,000-year-old concrete - made from volcanic ash, lime (the product of baked limestone), and seawater - has provided new clues to the evolving chemistry and mineral cements that allow ancient harbor structures to withstand the test of time. The research has also inspired a hunt for the original recipe so that modern concrete manufacturers can do as the Romans did.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 30.06.2017
Size not important for fish in the largest mass extinction of all time
Size not important for fish in the largest mass extinction of all time
Understanding modern biodiversity and extinction threats is important. It is commonly assumed that being large contributes to vulnerability during extinction crises. However, researchers from the University of Bristol and the Chengdu Center of the China Geological Survey, have found that size played no role in the extinction of fish during the largest mass extinction of all time.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 29.06.2017
Tree rings pinpoint eruption of Icelandic volcano to half a century before human settlement
Tree rings pinpoint eruption of Icelandic volcano to half a century before human settlement
An international group of researchers has dated a large volcanic eruption in Iceland to within a few months. The eruption, which is the oldest volcanic eruption to be precisely dated at high northern latitudes, occurred shortly before the first permanent human settlements were established, when parts of the now mostly treeless island were still covered with forest.  It was a happy coincidence that we were able to use all these different archives and techniques to date this eruption.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 28.06.2017
Brooding dinosaurs
Brooding dinosaurs
A new method used to perform geochemical analysis of fossilized eggs from China has shown that oviraptorosaurs incubated their eggs with their bodies within a 35–40° C range, similar to extant birds today. This finding is the result of Franco-Chinese collaboration coordinated by Romain Amiot of the Laboratoire de géologie de Lyon: Terre, planètes et environnement (CNRS/ENS de Lyon/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1).

Earth Sciences - 28.06.2017
‘Bulges' in volcanoes could be used to predict eruptions
‘Bulges’ in volcanoes could be used to predict eruptions
A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge have developed a new way of measuring the pressure inside volcanoes, and found that it can be a reliable indicator of future eruptions. This could be a new way of predicting volcanic eruptions. Clare Donaldson Using a technique called ‘seismic noise interferometry' combined with geophysical measurements, the researchers measured the energy moving through a volcano.

Earth Sciences - 27.06.2017
Distant earthquakes can cause underwater landslides
Distant earthquakes can cause underwater landslides
New research finds large earthquakes can trigger underwater landslides thousands of miles away, weeks or months after the quake occurs. Researchers analyzing data from ocean bottom seismometers off the Washington-Oregon coast tied a series of underwater landslides on the Cascadia Subduction Zone, 80 to 161 kilometers (50 to 100 miles) off the Pacific Northwest coast, to a 2012 magnitude-8.6 earthquake in the Indian Ocean - more than 13,500 kilometers (8,390 miles) away.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 19.06.2017
Subtropical climate conditions and mangrove growth in Arctic Siberia during the early Eocene
Subtropical climate conditions and mangrove growth in Arctic Siberia during the early Eocene
Abstract The early Eocene (ca. 56'47.8 Ma) was an interval of exceptional warmth with reduced pole-to-equator temperature gradients. Climate proxies indicate mean annual air temperatures (MATs) and sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) exceeding 8'18 °C and frost-free, mild winters in polar areas, features that have proven difficult to reproduce with the most elaborate climate models.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 14.06.2017
Study sheds light on Neanderthal-Homo sapiens transition
Archaeologists at The Australian National University (ANU) and the University of Sydney have provided a window into one of the most exciting periods in human history - the transition between Neanderthals and modern humans. An archaeological dig in a cave in the Moravian region of the Czech Republic has provided a timeline of evidence from 10 sedimentary layers spanning 28,000 to 50,000 years ago.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 14.06.2017
Hidden
Hidden "Rock Moisture" Could Explain Forest Surviving Drough
Research led by UT has found that weathered bedrock can store a significant amount of rock moisture inside its fractures and pores. This moisture in the layer of weathered rock that is commonly located beneath soils is an important part of the water cycle on the local and global level. Tree roots tap into the rock moisture and release it back into the atmosphere as water vapor, and water flows through the fractures and becomes part of the seasonal groundwater storage (blue arrows).

Earth Sciences - Health - 12.06.2017
Icelandic volcanic â?‘plumerangâ’’ could be bad for your health
An Oxford University collaboration has found previously undetected health risks contained in the boomerang-like return of an Icelandic volcanic plume. The new study, published in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, traced the evolution of the plume chemistry from the 2014-2015 Icelandic Holuhraun lava field eruption and found an unreported secondary (older) plume that had significant impact on air quality.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 07.06.2017
The secrets of tooth calcium revealed
The secrets of tooth calcium revealed
Two studies on calcium isotopes 1 in teeth have provided new insights into both the extinction of the dinosaurs and weaning age in humans. The findings of these studies, conducted by CNRS researchers at Lyon ENS and Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, were published, respectively, on 25 and 30 May 2017 in Current Biology and PNAS .

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 05.06.2017
Scientists analysing Martian mudstones reveal chemistry of ancient lake in study
Scientists analysing Martian mudstones reveal chemistry of ancient lake in study
Imperial's Professor Sanjeev Gupta talks about the chemistry of rocks on Mars and what they reveal about a lake that has long since dried up. Professor Gupta, from Imperial College London's Department of Earth Science and Engineering , is part of NASA's Curiosity mission. Every day, analyses data on the geology of Mars that is beamed back from the Mars Science Laboratory mission's remote-controlled Curiosity rover.

Earth Sciences - 05.06.2017
Report reveals a rise in the demand for food banks in the UK
Report reveals a rise in the demand for food banks in the UK
New research has found that there are at least 2000 food banks in the UK, a higher number than previously thought. The research is published by the Independent Food Aid Network (Ifan), Chaired by Jon May , Professor at the School of Geography, Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). According to the report, a growing number of food banks are giving out emergency food parcels on a weekly basis to people in hardship.

Earth Sciences - 02.06.2017
Magma reservoirs key to volcanic eruptions
New study shows the importance of large reservoirs in creating Earth's most powerful volcanic eruptions and explains why they are so rare Large reservoirs of magma stored deep in the Earth's crust are key to producing some of the Earth's most powerful volcanic eruptions, new research has shown. In a new study, an international team of scientists claim that the most powerful volcanic eruptions, dubbed ‘super-eruptions', are triggered by a slow and steady drip feed of magma from large reservoirs deep within the Earth's crust into smaller reservoirs closer to the surface.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 30.05.2017
In a cosmic hit-and-run, icy Saturn moon may have flipped
A team of researchers led by Cornell's Radwan Tajeddine examined Cassini data and found evidence that the active south polar region of Enceladus - the fractured terrain seen here at bottom - may have originally been closer to the icy moon's equator. Enceladus - a large icy, oceanic moon of Saturn - may have flipped, the possible victim of an out-of-this-world wallop.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 30.05.2017
Early human migration
New study reveals the importance of African groundwater in kick-starting the evolutionary history of humans An international team led by a researcher at Cardiff University believe that the movement of our ancestors across East Africa was shaped by the locations of groundwater springs. In a new study, the team argue that the springs acted as pit stops to allow early humans to survive as they moved across the African landscape.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 30.05.2017
'Halos' discovered on Mars widen time frame for potential life
’Halos’ discovered on Mars widen time frame for potential life
The halos were analyzed by the rover's science payload, including the laser-shooting Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.05.2017
New approach predicts threats to rainforests
Borneo is an island that has lost a staggering 30 percent of its forest since the 1970s and is among the most biodiverse and threatened on the planet. The study findings, published in Landscape Ecology, will be useful to all forest conservationists, and could help tropical forests around the world, including Borneo.

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