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Innovation / Technology - Electroengineering - 21.12.2017
Sensor-enhanced surgical robot enables highly precise and safe spinal operations
Sensor-enhanced surgical robot enables highly precise and safe spinal operations
Researchers from the University of Bern, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and the Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology develop a high-precision, sensor-based surgical robot for spinal operations together with industry partners. Their project is being funded with two million Swiss francs, sponsored by the "BRIDGE" programme of the Swiss National Science Foundation and the Commission for Technology and Innovation.

Electroengineering - Physics - 21.12.2017
New depth sensors could be sensitive enough for self-driving cars
New depth sensors could be sensitive enough for self-driving cars
For the past 10 years, the Camera Culture group at MIT's Media Lab has been developing innovative imaging systems - from a camera that can see around corners to one that can read text in closed books - by using "time of flight," an approach that gauges distance by measuring the time it takes light projected into a scene to bounce back to a sensor.

Computer Science / Telecom - Electroengineering - 20.12.2017
Memristors power quick-learning neural network
Memristors power quick-learning neural network
ANN ARBOR-A new type of neural network made with memristors can dramatically improve the efficiency of teaching machines to think like humans. The network, called a reservoir computing system, could predict words before they are said during conversation, and help predict future outcomes based on the present.

Physics - Electroengineering - 19.12.2017
A particle like slow light
A particle like slow light
A remarkable discovery was made at TU Wien recently, when particles known as 'Weyl fermions' were discovered in materials with strong interaction between electrons. Just like light particles, they have no mass but nonetheless they move extremely slowly. There was great excitement back in 2015, when it was first possible to measure these 'Weyl fermions' - outlandish, massless particles that had been predicted almost 90 years earlier by German mathematician, physician and philosopher, Hermann Weyl.

Physics - Electroengineering - 07.12.2017
First experiment at SwissFEL carried out successfully
First experiment at SwissFEL carried out successfully
The years of careful planning and construction have paid off: At the newest large-scale research facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI - the free-electron X-ray laser SwissFEL - the first experiment has been carried out successfully. With that, two goals have been achieved: First, a new scientific result is already expected.

Physics - Electroengineering - 06.12.2017
The quantum waltz of electrons hints at the next generation of chips
The quantum waltz of electrons hints at the next generation of chips
EPFL researchers have successfully measured some of the quantum properties of electrons in two-dimensional semiconductors. This work in the field of spintronics could one day lead to chips that are not only smaller but that also generate less heat. A group of spintronics researchers at EPFL is using new materials to reveal more of the many capabilities of electrons.

Chemistry - Electroengineering - 05.12.2017
Warmed up and raring to go
Warmed up and raring to go
During cold-start, a car engine emits far more particulate matter and other pollutants than during warm conditions. This is because a cold catalytic converter is much less efficient at low exhaust gas temperatures. So what's the answer? Preheat the cat with microwaves. Empa scientists have developed the first microwave converter heating for passenger car applications.

Physics - Electroengineering - 30.11.2017
Squeezing light into a tiny channel brings optical computing a step closer
Squeezing light into a tiny channel brings optical computing a step closer
By forcing light to go through a smaller gap than ever before, researchers have paved the way for computers based on light instead of electronics. Light is desirable for use in computing because it can carry a higher density of information and is much faster and more efficient than conventional electronics.

Electroengineering - Administration - 23.11.2017
GP online consultations: not the panacea policy makers are hoping for
GP online consultations: not the panacea policy makers are hoping for
Online GP consultation systems may not be the silver bullet for reducing GP workload and patient waiting times that government policymakers are hoping for, NIHR-funded research from the University of Bristol has found. These systems offer the potential to revolutionise use of primary care, but only with careful implementation and effective marketing, the researchers concluded.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 22.11.2017
Neuroscientists Construct First Whole-brain Map Showing Electrical Connections Key to Forming Memories
Neuroscientists Construct First Whole-brain Map Showing Electrical Connections Key to Forming Memories
A team of neuroscientists at the University of Pennsylvania has constructed the first whole-brain map of electrical connectivity in the brain based on data from nearly 300 neurosurgical patients with electrodes implanted directly on the brain.

Physics - Electroengineering - 20.11.2017
Quantum dots amplify light with electrical pumping
Quantum dots amplify light with electrical pumping
The team demonstrates that using their "designer" quantum dots, they can achieve light amplification in a nanocrystal solid with direct-current electrical pumping. We have been working to develop new lasing media, using chemically synthesized quantum dots, although it had been widely believed that quantum dot lasing with electrical stimulation is simply impossible.

Physics - Electroengineering - 16.11.2017
A new window into electron behavior
A new window into electron behavior
For the first time, physicists have developed a technique that can peer deep beneath the surface of a material to identify the energies and momenta of electrons there. The energy and momentum of these electrons, known as a material's "band structure," are key properties that describe how electrons move through a material.

Electroengineering - Physics - 15.11.2017
Optically tunable microwave antennas for 5G applications
Optically tunable microwave antennas for 5G applications
Multiband tunable antennas are a critical part of many communication and radar systems. New research by engineers at the University of Bristol has shown significant advances in antennas by using optically induced plasmas in silicon to tune both radiation patterns and operation frequency. Conventional antenna tuning is performed with diodes or Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) switches.

Electroengineering - Physics - 10.11.2017
A rubber power station
A rubber power station
Researchers from Empa have developed a flexible material that generates electricity when stressed. In future, it might be used as a sensor, integrated into clothing or even implanted in the human body, for instance, to power a pacemaker.

Electroengineering - 09.11.2017
New method developed to 3D print fully functional electronic circuits
Researchers at the University of Nottingham have pioneered a breakthrough method to rapidly 3D print fully functional electronic circuits. The circuits, which contain electrically-conductive metallic inks and insulating polymeric inks, can now be produced in a single inkjet printing process where a UV light rapidly solidifies the inks.

Electroengineering - Computer Science / Telecom - 08.11.2017
A robotic spy among the fish
A new miniature robot developed by EPFL researchers can swim with fish, learn how they communicate with each other and make them change direction or come together. These capabilities have been proven on schools of zebrafish. Researchers at EPFL's Robotic Systems Laboratory (LSRO), which is headed by Professor Francesco Mondada, have developed a miniature robot that can integrate perfectly into schools of zebrafish.

Electroengineering - Physics - 08.11.2017
New approach lays groundwork for manufacturing with light
An international team of researchers has developed a new light-based manipulation method that could one day be used to mass produce light-based devices and electronic components for smartphones, computers and other electronics. Optical traps, which use light to hold and move small objects in liquid, are promising as a non-contact method to assemble electronic and optical devices.

Chemistry - Electroengineering - 08.11.2017
Sensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortage
Sensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortage
Forgot to water that plant on your desk again? It may soon be able to send out an SOS. MIT engineers have created sensors that can be printed onto plant leaves and reveal when the plants are experiencing a water shortage. This kind of technology could not only save neglected houseplants but, more importantly, give farmers an early warning when their crops are in danger, says Michael Strano, the Carbon P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT and the senior author of the new study.

Environment - Electroengineering - 06.11.2017
Wallpaper bio-solar panel developed by researchers
Wallpaper bio-solar panel developed by researchers
A two-in-one solar bio-battery and solar panel has been created by researchers who printed living cyanobacteria and circuitry onto paper. Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic micro-organisms that have been on Earth for billions of years. They are thought to be the primary reason why the Earth's atmosphere is oxygen rich.

Physics - Electroengineering - 06.11.2017
'Smart' paper can conduct electricity, detect water
’Smart’ paper can conduct electricity, detect water
In cities and large-scale manufacturing plants, a water leak in a complicated network of pipes can take tremendous time and effort to detect, as technicians must disassemble many pieces to locate the problem. The American Water Works Association indicates that nearly a quarter-million water line breaks occur each year in the U.S., costing public water utilities about $2.8 billion annually.
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