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Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2017
Could deer hold clues about the link between malaria resistance and sickle cell?
Could deer hold clues about the link between malaria resistance and sickle cell?
Scientists have identified the genetic mutations that cause sickle cells in deer, according to new research Ecology & Evolution. The scientists from Imperial College London say although their research is in its early stages, it shows promise that certain species of deer might potentially be a surprising model in which to study the effects of sickling in humans such as resistance to malaria.

Social Sciences - Health - 19.12.2017
LGBQ Adolescents at Much Greater Risk of Suicide than Heterosexual Counterparts
Tuesday, December 19, 2017 Adolescents who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual or questioning are much more likely to consider, plan or attempt suicide than their heterosexual peers, according to research from the University of Pennsylvania , the University of California, San Diego , and San Diego State University published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association .

Pharmacology - Health - 19.12.2017
Screening could prevent a quarter of hip fractures in older women
Research led by scientists at the University of Birmingham has revealed a new cause of high blood pressure which could lead to major changes in managing the disease. High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, often goes unnoticed but if left untreated can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2017
Just 4,000 steps a day can lead to better brain health
Just 4,000 steps a day can lead to better brain health
For adults 60 and older, moderate daily walks improve attention and mental skills, UCLA study finds Leigh Hopper Walking more than 4,000 steps a day can improve attention and mental skills in adults 60 and older, according to UCLA research published December 12 in a preprint edition of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

Health - 19.12.2017
UK regions who voted to Leave the EU are more exposed economically to Brexit than anywhere else in Europe - research reveals
The rate of deaths during childbirth more than halved between 1993 and 2015 - representing a reduction of around 220 intrapartum (during labour) deaths per year - according to a report by a team of academics including Professor Sara Kenyon at the University of Birmingham. The report represents the findings of a team of academics, clinicians and charity representatives, called MBRRACE-UK, following their third perinatal confidential enquiry into deaths in childbirth.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2017
New UCL discovery in the fight against
New UCL discovery in the fight against
Research UCL - press release Researchers at the UCLouvain have made a major new discovery in the research on bacteria. Jean-François Collet, professor at UCL's de Duve Institute, and his team have shown that when you change the structure of a bacterium, you decrease its ability to detect environmental stress and to activate stress responses against antibiotics.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.12.2017
A non-invasive method to detect Alzheimer’s disease
New research has drawn a link between changes in the brain's anatomy and biomarkers that are known to appear at the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), findings that could one day provide a sensitive but non-invasive test for AD before cognitive symptoms appear. Scientists have known for some time that one of the first signs of AD is buildup of amyloid-Beta and tau proteins in the brain.

Health - Chemistry - 19.12.2017
Dengue ’Achilles heel’ insight offers hope for better vaccines
Researchers have new insights into how protective antibodies attack dengue viruses, which could lead to more effective dengue fever vaccines and drug therapies. The University of Queensland and China's ZhuJiang Hospital collaboratively led the study which identified an antibody that binds to, and kills, all four types of dengue virus.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2017
Research at KU Leuven
Surgical robots, Wi-Fi security flaws, and everything you always wanted to know about Tinder but were afraid to ask: here are the 10 most-read science stories of 2017! Surgical robots, Wi-Fi security flaws, and everything you always wanted to know about Tinder but were afraid to ask: here are the 10 most-read science stories of 2017! 1.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2017
Research at KU Leuven: what we learned in 2017
Surgical robots, Wi-Fi security flaws, and everything you always wanted to know about Tinder but were afraid to ask: here are the 10 most-read science stories of 2017! 1. World first: surgical robot performs precision-injection in patient with retinal vein occlusion Eye surgeons at University Hospitals Leuven have been the first to use a surgical robotto operate on a patient with retinal vein occlusion.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.12.2017
Neurons Encoding Familiarity and Novelty
Neurons Encoding Familiarity and Novelty
Caltech researchers discover that neurons within the posterior parietal cortex gather information about our memories to help us make memory-based decisions. It's a bit frustrating and a bit embarrassing: when a person looks so familiar, but their name hovers just out of mental reach, on the tip of your tongue.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.12.2017
Using gold nanoparticles to destroy viruses
Using gold nanoparticles to destroy viruses
EPFL researchers have created nanoparticles that attract viruses and, using the pressure resulting from the binding process, destroy them. This revolutionary approach could lead to the development of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs.  HIV, dengue, papillomavirus, herpes and Ebola - these are just some of the many viruses that kill millions of people every year, mostly children in developing countries.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.12.2017
Dementia with Lewy bodies: unique genetic profile identified
Dementia with Lewy bodies: unique genetic profile identified
Dementia with Lewy bodies has a unique genetic profile, distinct from those of Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease, according to the first large-scale genetic study of this common type of dementia which was led by UCL. The genome-wide association study, conducted by a UCL-led collaboration of 65 academics in 11 countries and funded by Alzheimer's Society and the Lewy Body Society, is published today in The Lancet Neurology .

Health - Psychology - 18.12.2017
Could cognitive interventions be useful in treating depression?
Could cognitive interventions be useful in treating depression?
A new study by experimental psychologists from the University of Bristol has examined whether cognitive bias modification (CBM) for facial interpretation, a digital health intervention that changes our perception for emotional expressions from negative to positive, might be useful in treating depression.

Health - Administration - 15.12.2017
Screening could catch a quarter of hip fractures before they happen
Screening could catch a quarter of hip fractures before they happen
Community screening for osteoporosis could prevent more than a quarter of hip fractures in older women - according to new research involving researchers from the Centre for Academic Primary Care, University of Bristol and local hospitals, and led by the University of East Anglia (UEA). The study, published today in The Lancet, reveals that a simple questionnaire, combined with bone mineral density measurements for some, would help identify those at risk of hip fracture.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.12.2017
Understanding the Neural Mechanisms of Sleep
Understanding the Neural Mechanisms of Sleep
Sleep is a crucial behavior for a properly functioning mind and body-just ask anyone who has experienced a sleepless night. But the complex neural mechanisms underlying sleep are only just beginning to be explored. As part of this exploration, neurobiologists like Caltech professor of biology David Prober aim to build up a catalog of genes that regulate sleep.

Health - Administration - 15.12.2017
Opportunities to vaccinate young women against HPV missed at alarming rate
Two-thirds of young women aged 18-26 who were eligible to receive Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine have missed at least one opportunity to receive the vaccine during a visit to an obstetrics and gynecology clinic, Yale researchers report. This study also confirms previous research showing racial disparities in vaccination for HPV: Women who identify as black are 61% more likely have had a missed opportunity than women who identify as white.

History / Archeology - Health - 15.12.2017
Ancient faeces reveal parasites described in earliest Greek medical texts
Ancient faeces reveal parasites described in earliest Greek medical texts
Earliest archaeological evidence of intestinal parasitic worms infecting the ancient inhabitants of Greece confirms descriptions found in writings associated with Hippocrates, the early physician and 'father of Western medicine'.

Health - 15.12.2017
Office work can be a pain in the neck
Neck pain is a common condition among office workers, but regular workplace exercises can prevent and reduce it, a University of Queensland study has found. Newly published research by PhD graduate and physiotherapist Dr Xiaoqi Chen from UQ's School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences revealed neck and shoulder-strengthening exercises and general fitness training exercises were effective in reducing and preventing neck pain.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.12.2017
Toxic agents behind Parkinson's disease seen at work for the first time
Toxic agents behind Parkinson’s disease seen at work for the first time
Researchers get their first look at how the toxic protein clusters associated with Parkinson's disease disrupt the membranes of healthy brain cells. Parkinson's disease is a degenerative nervous system disorder that affects more than six million people worldwide and causes nearly 120,000 deaths per year.

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