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Results 61 - 80 of 1422.


Health - Pharmacology - 11.12.2017
Novartis drug crizanlizumab shown to prolong time to patients’ first sickle cell pain crisis in subgroup analysis of SUSTAIN study
Investigational therapy crizanlizumab (SEG101, formerly SelG1) approximately doubled the time to first on-treatment sickle cell pain crisis, according to new subgroup analysis of Phase II SUSTAIN data Results were consistent across patient subgroups despite differences in disease severity, genotype or background therapy New findings for crizanlizumab, a potential disease-modifying, preventive treatment option for patients with sickle cell diseas

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2017
Hormone discovery marks breakthough in understanding fertility
Scientists at The University of Nottingham have shown, for the first time, that a naturally occurring hormone plays a vital part in regulating a woman's fertility, a discovery that could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of infertility. Research by Associate Professor Ravinder Anand-Ivell , Professor Richard Ivell and Yanzhenzi Dai in the School of Biosciences has been published in the online journal Frontiers in Physiology.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2017
Twitter can reveal our shared mood
Twitter can reveal our shared mood
In the largest study of its kind, researchers from the University of Bristol have analysed mood indicators in text from 800 million anonymous messages posted on Twitter. These tweets were found to reflect strong patterns of positive and negative moods over the 24-hour day. Circadian rhythms, widely referred to as the ‘body clock', allows people's bodies to predict their needs over the dark and light periods of the day.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.12.2017
Blood flow-sensing protein protects against atherosclerosis in mice
Blood flow-sensing protein protects against atherosclerosis in mice
FINDINGS UCLA scientists have found that a protein known as NOTCH1 helps ward off inflammation in the walls of blood vessels, preventing atherosclerosis — the narrowing and hardening of arteries that can cause heart attacks and strokes. The new finding , from research conducted on mice, also explains why areas of smooth, fast blood flow are less prone to inflammation: levels of NOTCH1 are higher in these vessels.

Health - 11.12.2017
"Death receptors" - new markers for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have found that the presence of death receptors in the blood can be used to directly measure the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. "We see that people with known risk factors such as high blood sugar and high blood fats also have heightened death receptor levels", says Professor Jan Nilsson who led the study.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 11.12.2017
Over 50s with fewer teeth at risk of frailty
Over 50s with fewer than 20 teeth at higher risk of musculoskeletal frailty New research by scientists at King's College London has found that tooth loss may contribute to musculoskeletal frailty in the over 50s, with those with fewer than 20 teeth being at greatest risk. Published in Geriatrics & Gerontology International on 11 December, the research led by Dr Wael Sabbah, from King's College London Dental Institute, examined the overall health of 9,338 Americans aged 50 years and older.

Health - Social Sciences - 11.12.2017
Babies born during famine have lower cognition in midlife
ANN ARBOR-Hunger and malnutrition in infancy may lead to poor cognitive performance in midlife, according to a new study. Researchers at University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Columbia University have found that child survivors of China's 1959-61 famine that killed millions appear to be haunted by their past, as their cognitive performances go downhill in their early 50s.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.12.2017
Deep brain waves occur more often during navigation and memory formation
Deep brain waves occur more often during navigation and memory formation
FINDINGS UCLA neuroscientists are the first to show that rhythmic waves in the brain called theta oscillations happen more often when someone is navigating an unfamiliar environment, and that the more quickly a person moves, the more theta oscillations take place — presumably to process incoming information faster.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.12.2017
Identifies how 3D printed metals can be both strong and ductile
Less than one per cent of UK children born with congenital heart disease are enrolled in clinical trials looking to improve treatments, research funded by the British Heart Foundation and led by the University of Birmingham and Birmingham Children's Hospital has found. The study, published in the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery today, is the first systematic review of its kind into clinical trials in children's heart surgery.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.12.2017
Liver Cancer: Lipid Synthesis Promotes Tumor Formation
Liver Cancer: Lipid Synthesis Promotes Tumor Formation
Lipid, also known as fat, is an optimal energy source and an important cell component. Much is required for the rapid and uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and from the University of Geneva have now discovered that the protein mTOR stimulates the production of lipids in liver tumors to satisfy the increased nutrient turnover and energy needs of cancer cells among other functions.

Health - Social Sciences - 08.12.2017
Heart disease linked to depression, loneliness, unemployment and poverty
Heart disease linked to depression, loneliness, unemployment and poverty
Social stress factors such as loneliness and being unemployed, in addition to conventional risks such as smoking and high blood pressure, are associated with higher risks of developing heart disease, according to a new UCL-led study. The study, published by PLOS Medicine this week, analysed cohort data from three eastern European countries and found that heart disease incidence is more likely among people who rarely see their friends and relatives, are single, unemployed, less wealthy, and have depression-like symptoms.

Health - 08.12.2017
Clinical trial reveals risky clot busters do not benefit most patients suffering from deep vein thrombosis
The largest clinical trial ever to test the effects of so-called clot busting drugs and medical devices concludes that such treatments do not prevent the long-term complication of post-thrombotic syndrome A clinical trial almost ten years in the making has revealed that risky, but powerful, clot busting drugs and medical devices do not improve outcomes for patients experiencing deep vein thrombosis (DVT), nor do they prevent the development of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) when compared with conventional blood thinning medications.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.12.2017
Depression’s causal mechanisms identified with new method
People with major depressive disorder have alterations in the activity and connectivity of brain systems underlying reward and memory, according to a new study by the University of Warwick. The findings provide clues as to which regions of the brain could be at the root of symptoms, such as reduced happiness and pleasure, or negative memories, in depression.

Health - Chemistry - 08.12.2017
Molecular beacon signals low oxygen with ultrasound
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Areas of hypoxia, or low oxygen in tissue, are hallmarks of fast-growing cancers and of blockages or narrowing in blood vessels, such as stroke or peripheral artery disease. University of Illinois researchers have developed a way to find hypoxic spots noninvasively in real time.

Health - Pharmacology - 08.12.2017

Administration - Health - 08.12.2017
Children negatively impacted by early intervention restrictions
As the government extends its income management program, new research indicates the original rollout in the Northern Territory did not improve school attendance and birth outcomes, and had negative short-term effects. Analysis reveals the federal government's initial income management scheme - first introduced in 2007 during the Northern Territory Emergency Response (NTER) or 'intervention', and now commonly known as Cashless Debit Card - coincided with significant negative outcomes for children in the short term, and no noticeable improvements in the long run.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.12.2017
YSM explores the pros and cons of giving at-home DNA tests as gifts
Perhaps 2017 might be remembered as the first holiday season when at-home genetic testing kits received the same billing as the latest version of Amazon's electronic assistant Alexa. These kits, which allow consumers to submit a saliva sample via mail and have their DNA sequenced, were a big seller during the four days between Black Friday and Cyber Monday this year.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.12.2017
Researchers establish long-sought source of ocean methane
Researchers establish long-sought source of ocean methane
Industrial and agricultural activities produce large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming. Many bacteria also produce methane as a byproduct of their metabolism. Some of this naturally released methane comes from the ocean, a phenomenon that has long puzzled scientists because there are no known methane-producing organisms living near the ocean's surface.

Health - 07.12.2017
Observation care may save more than thought
ANN ARBOR-In the world of health care spending policy, it usually works that as Medicare goes so goes private insurance on matters of managing the cost and quality of care. But new research from the University of Michigan reported in the December issue of Health Affairs suggests that when it comes to the growth in use of observation care, concerns about high out-of-pocket spending are unfounded for those with private coverage.

Health - 07.12.2017
Poor sleep could lead to heavier drinking in young adults, study finds
A shortened night of sleep may increase young adults' risk of heavier drinking, according to a new Yale study that assessed reciprocal variations in sleep and drinking over time in young adults. The study , conducted by Lisa Fucito, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, found that young adults consumed more alcohol following nights of less sleep and had more delayed sleep timing following heavier drinking occasions.

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