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Health - Life Sciences - 31.12.2017
The 10 most popular Imperial news stories of 2017
The 10 most popular Imperial news stories of 2017
The past 12 months have provided many eye-grabbing headlines from the Imperial community from world-leading research to incredible inventions. Before 2018 is upon us with its own wave of news, we take a quick look back at the most popular articles on our award-winning news site (ranked by the number of page views).

Life Sciences - Philosophy - 27.12.2017
Behind the scenes: journalists visit animal testing lab: "An unusual step": press event to launch the "Principles on the Ethical Treatment of Animals
The white mouse has been anaesthetized. Its little legs have been affixed to a heating plate by means of adhesive strips, and a large amount of gel has been spread over its clean-shaven breast. An ultrasound probe is positioned overhead, and Richard Holtmeier, a member of the team at the European Institute for Molecular Imaging (EIMI) at the University of Münster is using this to study how the mouse copes with a plastic catheter which has been inserted into its carotid artery.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.12.2017
Bacteria acquire resistance from competitors
Bacteria acquire resistance from competitors
Bacteria not only develop resistance to antibiotics, they also can pick it up from their rivals. In a recent publication in "Cell Reports", Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have demonstrated that some bacteria inject a toxic cocktail into their competitors causing cell lysis and death.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.12.2017
Cooling glove helps athletes and patients
What unites the needs of Ebola workers, people with multiple sclerosis and athletes comes down to one thing - cold hands. A device that cools the hands is finding widespread use from the playing field to the clinic. A cooling device that has been improving strength and endurance in mostly male athletes for 15 years is finding new uses in helping people with multiple sclerosis live normal lives, preventing overheating in Ebola workers and cooling working dogs.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 26.12.2017
Looking back at 2017 (1/2)
Coral reefs that can survive global warming, an expedition around Antarctica, a booster for genetic research, a personnal virtual heart, a National Center for Data Science... Some of the EPFL's research and milestones that marked the year 2017.

Life Sciences - 25.12.2017
Computer game highlights stroke paralysis partly due to a lack of 'mental focus'
Computer game highlights stroke paralysis partly due to a lack of ’mental focus’
An inability to focus the brain on tasks may partially explain why paralysis commonly occurs in people following a stroke, according to a news study. Patients who have suffered a stroke - where the blood flow to the brain is interrupted by a clot or bleed - often experience a degree of paralysis on one side of the body, termed hemiplegia, affecting the strength and dexterity in their limbs.

Life Sciences - 25.12.2017
How the brain selectively remembers new places
How the brain selectively remembers new places
When you enter a room, your brain is bombarded with sensory information. If the room is a place you know well, most of this information is already stored in long-term memory. However, if the room is unfamiliar to you, your brain creates a new memory of it almost immediately. MIT neuroscientists have now discovered how this occurs.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.12.2017
8 times Imperial research made you double-take in 2017
8 times Imperial research made you double-take in 2017
Some surprise research headlines need a second look, but quirky studies can often reveal serious science. From a geological Brexit to jellyfish computers, some research announcements are more than a little bit quirky. However, look beyond the headline and you'll find fascinating research with powerful real world applications.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.12.2017
7 times Imperial research blew your mind in 2017
7 times Imperial research blew your mind in 2017
Robotic prosthetics, AI guessing your brain age and much, much more. It's been quite a year for research, so here's just a few of the top stories... At times this year it may have seemed like science took a back seat, with politics bullying its way to the forefront and Brexit shoehorned into every headline to contend with.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2017
New marker in blood could detect fatal breast cancer up to one year earlier
New marker in blood could detect fatal breast cancer up to one year earlier
A new marker that could be used to diagnose fatal breast cancer up to one year ahead of current methods has been identified in a study led by UCL. The study, published in Genome Medicine today, found that changes detected in a part of DNA which the researches named EFC#93 could suggest early signs of deadly breast cancer.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.12.2017
Leukaemia treatment can be made more effective by using a drug for iron overload
Chemotherapy for one type of leukaemia could be improved by giving patients a drug currently used to treat an unrelated condition, new research shows. Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer that stops healthy blood cell production. Chemotherapy is the standard treatment, but improvements are needed as the five-year survival rate in patients older than 60 is only 5-15 per cent.

Computer Science / Telecom - Life Sciences - 21.12.2017
Researchers publish the first comprehensive list of vascular plant species of the Americas
Researchers publish the first comprehensive list of vascular plant species of the Americas
ANN ARBOR-An international research team has assembled the first complete list of all known vascular plant species in the Americas. The searchable database contains nearly 125,000 species representing one-third of all known vascular plants worldwide. Vascular plants are land plants with specialized internal-transport and vertical-support tissues.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2017
New test shows when body is fighting a virus
A new test that measures RNA or protein molecules in human cells can accurately identify viral infection as a cause of respiratory symptoms, according to a Yale study published Dec. 21 in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. Performed with a simple nasal swab, the test could prove to be a quicker, cheaper way to diagnose respiratory viral illnesses than current methods, the researchers said.

Life Sciences - 20.12.2017
How Plants Form Their Seeds
How Plants Form Their Seeds
Around 80 to 85 percent of our calorie needs is covered through seeds, either directly as food or indirectly through use as feed.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 20.12.2017
Origins of photosynthesis in plants dated to 1.25 billion years ago
The world's oldest algae fossils are a billion years old, according to a new analysis by earth scientists at McGill University. Based on this finding, the researchers also estimate that the basis for photosynthesis in today's plants was set in place 1.25 billion years ago. The study, published in the journal Geology , could resolve a long-standing mystery over the age of the fossilized algae, Bangiomorpha pubescens , which were first discovered in rocks in Arctic Canada in 1990.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2017
Could deer hold clues about the link between malaria resistance and sickle cell?
Could deer hold clues about the link between malaria resistance and sickle cell?
Scientists have identified the genetic mutations that cause sickle cells in deer, according to new research Ecology & Evolution. The scientists from Imperial College London say although their research is in its early stages, it shows promise that certain species of deer might potentially be a surprising model in which to study the effects of sickling in humans such as resistance to malaria.

Life Sciences - Physics - 19.12.2017
The fate of primordial germ cells: CiM researchers show how primordial germ cells follow their destiny and give rise to sperm and egg cells
The fate of primordial germ cells: CiM researchers show how primordial germ cells follow their destiny and give rise to sperm and egg cells
When an embryo develops, single cells acquire specific fates that allow them to perform specific tasks in the adult organism. The primordial germ cells are formed very early in embryonic development and migrate within the embryo to the developing testis or the ovary, where they give rise to sperm and egg cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2017
Just 4,000 steps a day can lead to better brain health
Just 4,000 steps a day can lead to better brain health
For adults 60 and older, moderate daily walks improve attention and mental skills, UCLA study finds Leigh Hopper Walking more than 4,000 steps a day can improve attention and mental skills in adults 60 and older, according to UCLA research published December 12 in a preprint edition of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

Life Sciences - Environment - 19.12.2017
Study into catastrophic population decline for flying insects is UK's most discussed scientific paper of 2017
Study into catastrophic population decline for flying insects is UK’s most discussed scientific paper of 2017
Study into catastrophic population decline for flying insects is UK's most discussed scientific paper of 2017 A research project involving the University of Sussex detailing the catastrophic loss of insect populations on nature reserves has been named the most discussed journal article in the UK in 2017.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2017
New UCL discovery in the fight against
New UCL discovery in the fight against
Research UCL - press release Researchers at the UCLouvain have made a major new discovery in the research on bacteria. Jean-François Collet, professor at UCL's de Duve Institute, and his team have shown that when you change the structure of a bacterium, you decrease its ability to detect environmental stress and to activate stress responses against antibiotics.
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