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Results 61 - 80 of 137.


History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 18.08.2017
Archaeologists uncover ancient trading network in Vietnam
This isn't a case of people producing a couple of extra items on top of what they need. It's a major operation. A team of archaeologists from ANU has uncovered a vast trading network which operated in Vietnam from around 4,500 years ago up until around 3,000 years ago. A new study shows a number of settlements along the Mekong Delta region of Southern Vietnam were part of a sophisticated scheme where large volumes of items were manufactured and circulated over hundreds of kilometres.

Social Sciences - Health - 11.08.2017
August: hazardous pesticides | News | University of Bristol
August: hazardous pesticides | News | University of Bristol
Global policies on access to highly hazardous pesticides - commonly ingested in acts of self-poisoning and suicide in rural Asia - should focus on national bans, rather than safe storage, according to two studies involving University of Bristol academics in The Lancet and The Lancet Global Health journals.

Social Sciences - Health - 07.08.2017
Individuals with bipolar disorder need workplace support
ANN ARBOR-People with bipolar disorder often find themselves unemployed due to exclusion, stigma and stereotypes directed at them at work, a new study found. These workers had to disclose their condition to co-workers and employers to receive special accommodations or more support, but often the outcomes are negative, say researchers at the University of Michigan and the University of California, Los Angeles.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 31.07.2017
Parallels between unresponsive honey bees, autism in humans
Parallels between unresponsive honey bees, autism in humans
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Honey bees that consistently fail to respond to obvious social cues share something fundamental with autistic humans, researchers report in a new study. Genes most closely associated with autism spectrum disorders in humans are regulated differently in unresponsive honey bees than in their more responsive nest mates, the study found.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 27.07.2017
Isotopes in prehistoric cattle teeth suggest a variety of herding strategies were used during the Neolithic
Isotopes in prehistoric cattle teeth suggest a variety of herding strategies were used during the Neolithic
Over the course of the Neolithic period, secondary products from cattle such as milk, manure and animal power became more important. This led to larger herds, and the increased demand for grazing resources could have led to herding strategies that took advantage of grazing grounds away from the permanent settlement.

Social Sciences - 20.07.2017
Young people want more choice in GCSE experience
A new study by researchers from the Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods (WISERD) at Cardiff University and Queen's University Belfast has found that students in Wales and Northern Ireland want more choice and fairness when it comes to their GCSE experience, including the subject selection process and the pressure to take on particular academic subjects.

Health - Social Sciences - 19.07.2017
Study examines effects of stopping psychiatric medication
Study examines effects of stopping psychiatric medication
UCLA professor co-authored new report showing that more than half of people succeed in discontinuing usage of drugs George Foulsham Despite numerous obstacles and severe withdrawal effects, long-term users of psychiatric drugs can stop taking them if they choose, and mental health care professionals could be more helpful to such individuals, according to a new study.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 13.07.2017
How social rank can trigger vulnerability to stress
How social rank can trigger vulnerability to stress
EPFL scientists have identified rank in social hierarchies as a major determining factor for vulnerability to chronic stress. They also show that energy metabolism in the brain is a predictive biomarker for social status as well as stress vulnerability and resilience. Stress is a major risk factor for a range of psychopathologies.

Social Sciences - Health - 11.07.2017
Memory of social interactions impaired in all phases of schizophrenia
Memory of social interactions impaired in all phases of schizophrenia
FINDINGS People with schizophrenia have trouble remembering the details of social interactions in all phases of the illness, researchers report. However, in the early stages of schizophrenia, patients can remember more about these interactions if given hints about context. This finding suggests a potential strategy for memory training.

Health - Social Sciences - 10.07.2017
Questionnaires can be a good predictor of survival rates in multiple sclerosis
Questionnaires can be a good predictor of survival rates in multiple sclerosis
The way in which patients with multiple sclerosis answer questionnaires could help to predict their survival rate from the disease, a study has found. The research, carried out at Imperial in collaboration with University Medical Centre Göttingen , shows that MS patients with higher scores on a standardised questionnaire were more likely to die in the next 10 years compared to those who recorded lower scores.

Social Sciences - 05.07.2017
Handshaking viewed more positively by Westerners than by East Asians
Handshaking viewed more positively by Westerners than by East Asians
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Westerners view handshaking more positively than do East Asians, researchers report in a new study. Western men also rate handshakes initiated by men and women differently, the study found. The research is reported in the Journal of Nonverbal Behavior. “We know from previous studies that handshaking positively affects people's first impressions and evaluations of others,” said U. of I. graduate student Yuta Katsumi , who led the research with U. of I. psychology professors Sanda Dolcos and Florin Dolcos.

Social Sciences - Health - 30.06.2017
Paper: New mothers abused by partners at greater risk of suicidal thoughts
Paper: New mothers abused by partners at greater risk of suicidal thoughts
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — New mothers who are in abusive relationships are three times more likely to have suicidal thoughts, a new study suggests. Conducted with women in Brazil, the study is among a growing body of research to establish a link between suicidality and intimate partner violence among postpartum women in lowor middle-income countries.

Social Sciences - 29.06.2017
Chicago jobs program reduces youth violence, Urban Labs study shows
Researchers at the University of Chicago Urban Labs announced new results from their study of One Summer Chicago Plus , a jobs program designed to reduce violence and prepare youth living in some of the city's highest-violence neighborhoods for the labor market. The study was carried out over the summer of 2013 in partnership with the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services.

Computer Science / Telecom - Social Sciences - 26.06.2017
Detecting riots with Twitter
Social media can be an invaluable source of information for police when managing major disruptive events, new research from Cardiff University has shown. An analysis of data taken from the London riots in 2011 showed that computer systems could automatically scan through Twitter and detect serious incidents, such as shops being broken in to and cars being set alight, before they were reported to the Metropolitan Police Service.

Social Sciences - Health - 21.06.2017
Marriage makes men fatter, shows new research
Marriage makes men fatter, shows new research
Being married makes men gain weight, and the early days of fatherhood add to the problem, finds new research from the University of Bath's School of Management. The study shows that married men have a higher Body Mass Index (BMI) than their non-married counterparts, adding approximately three pounds or 1.4kg to the scales.

Social Sciences - 14.06.2017
Using inhalers can lead to mocking and social exclusion for teenagers
Using inhalers can lead to mocking and social exclusion for teenagers
Teenagers with asthma are embarrassed to use their inhalers even though they could prevent life-threatening asthma attacks, a new study by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) has found. The research, published in BMJ Open , analysed posts written by teenagers and their parents from Asthma UK â?‘s online forum between 2006 and 2016.

Social Sciences - Health - 14.06.2017
New tool helps pick puppies most suited to guide dog training
Photo © Guide Dogs UK Animal behaviour experts at the University of Nottingham have developed a new tool which can be used to predict a young dog's likelihood of successfully completing guide dog training. Working dog organisations like the charity Guide Dogs, who funded the research, need to regularly assess the behaviour of the dogs they breed for training as not all of them turn out to be suited to the role.

Social Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 08.06.2017
Fake online profiles easier to fish out with new software tool
Fake online profiles easier to fish out with new software tool
People who use fake profiles online could be more easily identified, thanks to a new tool co-developed by a computer scientist at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). Dr Gareth Tyson and researchers from the University of Edinburgh have trained computer models to spot social media users who make up information about themselves â?- known as catfishes.

Computer Science / Telecom - Social Sciences - 07.06.2017
Fake online profiles easier to fish out with new software tool
Fake online profiles easier to fish out with new software tool
People who use fake profiles online could be more easily identified, thanks to a new tool developed by computer scientists. Researchers have trained computer models to spot social media users who make up information about themselves - known as catfishes. The system is designed to identify users who are dishonest about their age or gender.

Social Sciences - Law / Forensics - 06.06.2017
Culture affects how people deceive others say researchers
Culture affects how people deceive others say researchers
Psychologists have discovered that people's language changes when they lie depending on their cultural background. Psychologists have discovered that people's language changes when they lie depending on their cultural background. Professor Paul Taylor from Lancaster University said: “Science has long known that people's use of language changes when they lie.