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Veterinary Science



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Health - Veterinary Science - 20.12.2017
Novel tool for vets and farmers to monitor and reduce antibiotics on dairy farms
Veterinary researchers at the University of Nottingham have produced a new tool to help UK dairy vets and farmers monitor and reduce use of antibiotics in their dairy herds to help combat antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in the farming industry and beyond. It follows a new study by the Nottingham Vet School showing that, in a large sample of dairy farms, 25% of farms used 50% of the total antibiotics used across all farms in a year - with antibiotic footbaths accounting for the biggest volume dispersed into the food chain.

Veterinary Science - 23.11.2017
FEI extends global equine injuries research agreement with Glasgow University for further two years
The FEI has extended its highly successful global equine injuries research partnership with the University of Glasgow for another two years through to 2019, to further develop the Global Endurance Injuries Study (GEIS). The extension will maximise the impact of the GEIS across Endurance and also look at the potential development of similar methodology for other FEI disciplines.

Health - Veterinary Science - 09.11.2017
Taking Blood Using ’Push-Pull’ Method Gets Accurate Results With Fewer Pokes, Penn Study Shows
Thursday, November 9, 2017 A new study by University of Pennsylvania veterinary researchers has found that blood samples collected from an intravenous catheter using a special "mixing" technique are as accurate as those collected via venipuncture, in which a needle is used to access the vein directly.

Health - Veterinary Science - 07.11.2017
Current cattle injections increase the risk of injury, research finds
Research by experts at The University of Nottingham suggests that current injection techniques in UK dairy cattle need to change to avoid the risk of nerve injury. The study, carried out by a team of vets with anatomical, pathological and clinical expertise, discovered that current methods of injection are more likely to damage the sciatic nerve - particularly in dairy cattle with a low body condition score, such as those cows who have recently calved.

Life Sciences - Veterinary Science - 06.09.2017
Getting hook bending off the hook
Getting hook bending off the hook
The bending of a hook into wire to fish for the handle of a basket by the crow Betty 15 years ago stunned the scientific world. However, the finding was recently relegated as similar behavioural routines were discovered in the natural repertoire of the same species, suggesting the possibility that Betty's tool manufacture was less intelligent than previously believed.

Life Sciences - Veterinary Science - 31.08.2017
How are antimicrobials used around the world in food-producing animals?
How are antimicrobials used around the world in food-producing animals?
A new study led by academics at the Bristol Veterinary School has reviewed the literature on the use of antimicrobials (AM) in livestock practice together with the views of stakeholders. The study found that although there are some barriers to change, there is a clear awareness of the issue among the livestock sectors and a willingness to modify AM use.

Health - Veterinary Science - 18.08.2017
Paper: Clinical signs best predictors of mortality in critically ill calves
Paper: Clinical signs best predictors of mortality in critically ill calves
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Clinical signs such as gastrointestinal problems or septic arthritis may be better predictors of mortality in neonatal calves with diarrhea than blood pH levels and other laboratory findings, a new study suggests. The research also may finally resolve a century-old debate among scientists about the blood pH levels needed to sustain life in humans and other mammals.

Veterinary Science - Life Sciences - 18.08.2017
Calves should receive more pain relief during husbandry procedures, researchers find
Calves may not be receiving the right level of pain relief when undergoing routine animal husbandry procedures including castration and disbudding, new research has found. The study from The University of Nottingham School of Veterinary Medicine and Science , published in the Vet Record , found that despite being recognised as being as painful as other procedures, calf husbandry procedures were significantly less likely to include the use of analgesics such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in addition to the local anaesthetic that is routinely used.

Health - Veterinary Science - 01.08.2017
No simple way of predicting breathing difficulties in pugs, French bulldogs and bulldogs from external features
No simple way of predicting breathing difficulties in pugs, French bulldogs and bulldogs from external features
As many as a half of all short-nosed dogs such as pugs, French bulldogs and bulldogs experience breathing difficulties related to their facial structure. However, research published today by the University of Cambridge suggests that there is no way to accurately predict from visible features whether an apparently healthy pug or French bulldog will go on to develop breathing difficulties.

Veterinary Science - 05.04.2017
Veterinary professionals need to change how they connect with their clients
Veterinary professionals need to change how they connect with their clients
When advising on animal health and welfare, veterinarians often struggle to engage with the motivational needs of their clients. New research has shown a change is needed in how veterinarians communicate with and advise animal owners, to promote engagement with their advice and protect the animals in their care.