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Chemistry



Results 41 - 60 of 282.


Chemistry - Physics - 16.11.2017
A new way to store thermal energy
A new way to store thermal energy
In large parts of the developing world, people have abundant heat from the sun during the day, but most cooking takes place later in the evening when the sun is down, using fuel - such as wood, brush or dung - that is collected with significant time and effort. Now, a new chemical composite developed by researchers at MIT could provide an alternative.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 13.11.2017
Fuel Cell X-Ray Study Details Effects of Temperature and Moisture on Performance
Fuel Cell X-Ray Study Details Effects of Temperature and Moisture on Performance
Like a well-tended greenhouse garden, a specialized type of hydrogen fuel cell - which shows promise as a clean, renewable next-generation power source for vehicles and other uses - requires precise temperature and moisture controls to be at its best. If the internal conditions are too dry or too wet, the fuel cell won't function well.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 10.11.2017
Engineers Create First-of-its-Kind Chemical Oscillator
AUSTIN, Texas - DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors. Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit computation within molecular systems designed for applications in health care, advanced materials and nanotechnology.

Chemistry - Health - 09.11.2017
Fatty molecule in human blood controls malaria parasites' decision to leap to mosquitoes
Fatty molecule in human blood controls malaria parasites’ decision to leap to mosquitoes
Depletion of a fatty molecule in human blood propels malaria parasites to stop replicating and causing illness in people and instead to jump ship to mosquitoes to continue the transmission cycle, according to a new study by an international research team co-led by the University of Glasgow. The discovery, published online in Cell, answers a longstanding question about what controls this critical step in the life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum , the parasite responsible for about half a million malaria deaths worldwide each year.

Chemistry - Physics - 09.11.2017
New study sheds light on how earliest forms of life evolved on Earth
A new study led by ANU has shed light on how the earliest forms of life evolved on Earth about four billion years ago. In a major advance on previous work, the study found a compound commonly used in hair bleach, hydrogen peroxide, made the eventual emergence of life possible. Lead researcher Associate Professor Rowena Ball from ANU said hydrogen peroxide was the vital ingredient in rock pores around underwater heat vents that set in train a sequence of chemical reactions that led to the first forms of life.

Chemistry - Electroengineering - 08.11.2017
Sensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortage
Sensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortage
Forgot to water that plant on your desk again? It may soon be able to send out an SOS. MIT engineers have created sensors that can be printed onto plant leaves and reveal when the plants are experiencing a water shortage. This kind of technology could not only save neglected houseplants but, more importantly, give farmers an early warning when their crops are in danger, says Michael Strano, the Carbon P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT and the senior author of the new study.

Physics - Chemistry - 08.11.2017
Tomb-raided quantum theory opens way to improved biosensing
Hydrogen-based solar energy storage and biosensing techniques could be dramatically improved after University of Sydney researchers show the validity of theory first proposed in 1931. Researchers at the University of Sydney have applied quantum techniques to understanding the electrolysis of water, which is the application of an electric current to H2O to produce the constituent elements hydrogen and oxygen.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 06.11.2017
Gelatin accelerates healing of the blood brain barrier in acute brain injury
Gelatin accelerates healing of the blood brain barrier in acute brain injury
Researchers already know that gelatin-covered electrode implants cause less damage to brain tissue than electrodes with no gelatin coating. Researchers at the Neuronano Research Centre (NRC) at Lund University in Sweden have now shown that microglia, the brain's cleansing cells, and the enzymes that the cells use in the cleaning process, change in the presence of gelatin.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 02.11.2017
Electrostatic force takes charge in bioinspired polymers
Electrostatic force takes charge in bioinspired polymers
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Researchers at the University of Illinois and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst have taken the first steps toward gaining control over the self-assembly of synthetic materials in the same way that biology forms natural polymers. This advance could prove useful in designing new bioinspired, smart materials for applications ranging from drug delivery to sensing to remediation of environmental contaminants.

Chemistry - Physics - 30.10.2017
New Studies on Disordered Cathodes May Provide Much-Needed Jolt to Lithium Batteries
New Studies on Disordered Cathodes May Provide Much-Needed Jolt to Lithium Batteries
Today's lithium-ion battery was invented so long ago, there are not many more efficiencies to wring out of it. Now researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) report major progress in cathodes made with so-called "disordered" materials, a promising new type of lithium battery.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 24.10.2017
Genome Research Challenges Previous Understanding of the Origin of Photosynthesis
Genome Research Challenges Previous Understanding of the Origin of Photosynthesis
–Written by Leah Sloan Plant biologists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), in collaboration with colleagues from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), have reconstructed the evolutionary history of photosynthesis to provide new insight into the yet-unfolding story of its origins.

Physics - Chemistry - 24.10.2017
Jumping Nanoparticles
Jumping Nanoparticles
Transitions occurring in nanoscale systems, such as a chemical reaction or the folding of a protein, are strongly affected by friction and thermal noise. Almost 80 years ago, the Dutch physicist Hendrik Kramers predicted that such transitions occur most frequently at intermediate friction, an effect known as Kramers turnover.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 20.10.2017
New function in gene-regulatory protein discovered
Researchers at Umeå and Stockholm universities in Sweden and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the US have published a new study in the journal Molecular Cell. In the article, they show how the protein CBP affects the expression of genes through its interaction with the basal machinery that reads the instructions in our DNA.

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 18.10.2017
48-million-year-old wax discovered in a bird fossil
48-million-year-old wax discovered in a bird fossil
Researchers have analysed a well-preserved preening gland in a 48-million-year-old bird fossil and discovered original oil and wax molecules within it. The fossil is from the famous Messel locality in Germany, well known to preserve birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, insects and leaves with exceptional details.

Chemistry - Environment - 17.10.2017
Separating methane and COâ‚‚ will become more efficient
To make natural gas and biogas suitable for use, the methane has to be separated from the CO2. This involves the use of membranes: filters that stop the methane and let the CO2 pass through. Researchers at KU Leuven have developed a new membrane that makes the separation process much more effective.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 17.10.2017
An exceptionally preserved sea turtle reveals ancient sun protection
An exceptionally preserved sea turtle reveals ancient sun protection
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered well-preserved pigments and other biomolecules in a 54 million-year-old baby sea turtle. The molecular analyses show that the turtle's shell contained pigments to protect it from harmful UV rays of the sun. The researchers investigated the microscopic and molecular contents of soft tissues retrieved from a fossil that is approximately 54 million years old.

Chemistry - 17.10.2017
World first for reading digitally encoded synthetic molecules
World first for reading digitally encoded synthetic molecules
For the first time ever, using mass spectrometry, researchers have successfully read several bytes 1 of data recorded on a molecular scale using synthetic polymers. Their work, conducted under the aegis of the Institut Charles Sadron (CNRS) in Strasbourg and the Institute of Radical Chemistry (CNRS / Aix-Marseille University), sets a new benchmark for the amount of data—stored as a sequence of molecular units (monomers)—that may be read using this routine method.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 12.10.2017
Dealing with disaster - when rooted to the spot
When nature turns nasty plants can't run for cover, they have had to evolve to survive what the environment throws at them. Whether that's drought, flooding, saline soils or extreme temperatures, scientists, led by a team at the University of Nottingham , have now discovered that flowering plants have adopted a single biochemical mechanism to sense multiple environmental stresses, that enhances survival.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 12.10.2017
Enzymes at work: breaking down stubborn cellulose
Enzymes at work: breaking down stubborn cellulose
TU Graz researchers observe enzymes breaking down cellulose to aid the production of biofuels. The results are now published. Biofuels obtained from biomass are becoming increasingly important. Apart from biomethane, however, they cannot be produced efficiently, cheaply and sustainably since the current technological complexity and costs are still too high.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 11.10.2017
Some plants grow bigger - and meaner - when clipped, study finds
Some plants grow bigger - and meaner - when clipped, study finds
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Some plants behave like the mythical monster Hydra: Cut off their heads and they grow back, bigger and better than before. A new study finds that these "overcompensators," as they are called, also augment their defensive chemistry - think plant venom - when they are clipped. Clipping removes the primary stem and simulates what browsing mammals do when they eat plants in the wild.