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Results 61 - 80 of 282.


Chemistry - Physics - 09.10.2017
When a porous solid retains its properties in liquid form
When a porous solid retains its properties in liquid form
Known for their exceptional porosity that enables the trapping or transport of molecules, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) take the form of a powder, which makes them difficult to format.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 02.10.2017
Traces of Methyl Chloride around Infant Stars and Nearby Comet
Traces of Methyl Chloride around Infant Stars and Nearby Comet
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have detected the faint molecular fingerprint of methyl chloride - a chemical commonly produced by industrial and biological processes here on Earth - around an infant star system known as IRAS 16293-2422. Traces of this organic compound were also discovered in the thin atmosphere of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P/C-G) by the Rosetta space probe.

Chemistry - 29.09.2017
Helium found in coal seams could aid safe shale gas extraction
Natural deposits of helium gas - best known for its use in party balloons - could help aid the safe production of shale or coal gas, research suggests. The discovery of high levels of helium in UK coal seams could help scientists to monitor the secure recovery of coal or shale gas from underground sites.

Civil Engineering - Chemistry - 29.09.2017
A concrete solution
A concrete solution
Cement materials, including cement paste, mortar, and concrete, are the most widely manufactured materials in the world. Their carbon footprint is similarly hefty: The processes involved in making cement contribute almost 6 percent of global carbon emissions. The demand for these materials is unlikely to decline any time soon.

Physics - Chemistry - 28.09.2017
U-M researchers develop technique that could detect explosives, dangerous gases rapidly and remotely
ANN ARBOR-University of Michigan researchers have developed a laser-based method that could be used to detect chemicals such as explosives and dangerous gases quickly and accurately. Eventually, this method could be used in systems placed in airports, for the environmental monitoring of pollutants or even in battlefields, said author Steven Cundiff, physics professor in the College of Literature.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 28.09.2017
Researchers identify molecular motor that transforms chromosomes
Researchers identify molecular motor that transforms chromosomes
A molecular "motor" that organizes the genome into distinct neighborhoods by forming loops of DNA has been characterized by researchers at MIT and the Pasteur Institute in France. In a study published in 2016, a team led by Leonid Mirny, a professor of physics in MIT's Institute for Medical Engineering and Sciences, proposed that molecular motors transform chromosomes from a loosely tangled state into a dynamic series of expanding loops.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 28.09.2017
University of Birmingham welcomes Indian music superstar
Fuels that are produced from nonpetroleum-based biological sources may become greener and more affordable, thanks to research performed by the University of Birmingham and University of Illinois' Prairie Research Institute that examines the use of a processing catalyst made from palladium metal and bacteria.

Health - Chemistry - 27.09.2017
Researchers uncover the source of diabetic pain
Image (left) shows nerve fibres (green) in a normal mouse, while the loss of nerve fibres in a diabetic mouse is clearly visible in the image on the right. Human diabetic patients show a similar loss of nerve fibres and the activity of HCN2 in these fibres is associated with the development of pain.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 26.09.2017
New synthesis boosts commercialization
New synthesis boosts commercialization
Chemists from Empa have developed and patented an environmentally friendly way to produce flame retardants for foams that can be used in mattresses and upholstery.

Chemistry - Physics - 26.09.2017
Artificial intelligence for obtaining chemical fingerprints
Artificial intelligence for obtaining chemical fingerprints
Researchers at the Universities of Vienna and Göttingen have succeeded in developing a method for predicting molecular infrared spectra based on artificial intelligence. These chemical "fingerprints" could only be simulated by common prediction techniques for small molecules in high quality. With the help of the new technology, which is based on neuronal networks similar to the human brain and is therefore capable of learning, the team led by Philipp Marquetand from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna was able to carry out simulations that were previously not possible.

Environment - Chemistry - 26.09.2017
Atmosphere in X-ray light
Atmosphere in X-ray light
Light from the particle accelerator helps to understand ozone decomposition A new experimental chamber coupled to the Swiss Light Source (SLS), a large-scale research facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, allows researchers to recreate atmospheric processes in the laboratory through unprecedented precision analysis involving X-rays.

Physics - Chemistry - 25.09.2017
Searching for the best 3D-printing materials
Searching for the best 3D-printing materials
TU Wien is conducting research into high-precision 3D printing technology. Now, a new method is enabling researchers to look for suitable materials with greater precision than ever. How is it possible to build a model of St Stephen's Cathedral the size of a dust particle' Well, using TU Wien's modern 3D-printing technology, this is no longer a problem.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 21.09.2017
Pew! Pew! Curiosity's ChemCam zaps a half million Martian rocks
Pew! Pew! Curiosity’s ChemCam zaps a half million Martian rocks
ChemCam instrument aboard Mars Curiosity rover passes milestone "The data that has been delivered by ChemCam from Gale Crater has really changed our understanding of Mars," said Roger Wiens, principal investigator of the ChemCam project at Los Alamos. "It's told us things about the planet's geologic history that we never imagined possible." LOS ALAMOS, N.M. September 21, 2017-Late Tuesday, the ChemCam instrument that sits atop NASA's Mars Curiosity rover fired its 500,000 th shot at a Martian rock.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.09.2017
Scientist proves theory chemists have waited two decades to understand
Groundbreaking research led by Simon Woodward,a professor of synthetic organic chemistry at the University of Nottingham, has proved how a catalyst (a small atomic-sized 'machine' that knits together new molecules) in organo-copper chemistry works. This is one of the key approaches of modern chemistry to making larger molecules.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.09.2017
New analysis explains role of defects in metal oxides
New analysis explains role of defects in metal oxides
Sometimes things that are technically defects, such as imperfections in a material's crystal lattice, can actually produce changes in properties that open up new kinds of useful applications. New research from a team at MIT shows that such imperfections in a family of materials known as insulating metal oxides may be key to their performance for a variety of high-tech applications, such as nonvolatile memory chips and energy conversion technologies.

Physics - Chemistry - 20.09.2017
Scientists make atoms-thick Post-It notes for solar cells and circuits
Over the past half-century, scientists have shaved silicon films down to just a wisp of atoms in pursuit of smaller, faster electronics. For the next set of breakthroughs, though, they'll need novel ways to build even tinier and more powerful devices. In a study published Sept. 20 in  Nature , UChicago and Cornell University researchers describe an innovative method to make stacks of semiconductors just a few atoms thick.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 14.09.2017
New way to speed up chemical reactions
New way to speed up chemical reactions
A team of scientists and engineers from UCLA and Japan's University of Shizuoka has discovered a new mode of enzyme catalysis, the process that speeds up chemical reactions. The researchers also demonstrated that the enzyme, called LepI, can catalyze reactions that were not previously observed in nature.

Chemistry - Physics - 14.09.2017
New Study on Graphene-Wrapped Nanocrystals Makes Inroads Toward Next-Gen Fuel Cells
New Study on Graphene-Wrapped Nanocrystals Makes Inroads Toward Next-Gen Fuel Cells
Simulations and analysis at Berkeley Lab provide new atomic-scale clues to material's enhanced hydrogen storage properties A powdery mix of metal nanocrystals wrapped in single-layer sheets of carbon atoms, developed at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), shows promise for safely storing hydrogen for use with fuel cells for passenger vehicles and other uses.

Physics - Chemistry - 13.09.2017
In step toward 'controlling chemistry,' physicists create a new type of molecule, atom by atom
In step toward ’controlling chemistry,’ physicists create a new type of molecule, atom by atom
UCLA physicists have pioneered a method for creating a unique new molecule that could eventually have applications in medicine, food science and other fields. Their research , which also shows how chemical reactions can be studied on a microscopic scale using tools of physics, is reported . For the past 200 years, scientists have developed rules to describe chemical reactions that they've observed, including reactions in food, vitamins, medications and living organisms.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 13.09.2017
Inferno world with titanium skies
Inferno world with titanium skies
An international team of astronomers has detected titanium oxide in the atmosphere of an exoplanet for the first time. The results provide unique information about the chemical composition and the temperature and pressure structure of the atmosphere of this unusual and very hot world. The clear detection of the molecule is a major observational advancement - it is an exciting time in exoplanetary science.