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Results 81 - 100 of 282.


Physics - Chemistry - 13.09.2017
Researchers Lay Fundamental Groundwork to Better Understanding Optical Properties of Glass
Glass is everywhere. Whether someone is gazing out a window or scrolling through a smartphone, odds are that there is a layer of glass between them and whatever it is they're looking at. Despite being around for at least 5,000 years, there is still a lot that is unknown about this material, such as how certain glasses form and how they achieve certain properties.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.09.2017
Hollow Atoms: The Consequences of an Underestimated Effect
Hollow Atoms: The Consequences of an Underestimated Effect
A riddle, which has been bugging atomic physicists for more than 20 years, has been solved. The solution should help to understand the helpful effects of ionizing radiation in cancer therapy. A highly charged ion (center) passing through graphene can transfer energy to several carbon atoms simultaneously.

Chemistry - Environment - 07.09.2017
Chemists discover molecular iodine in Arctic atmosphere, released by snowpack
Chemists discover molecular iodine in Arctic atmosphere, released by snowpack
ANN ARBOR-For the first time, scientists have measured molecular iodine in the atmosphere of the Arctic and discovered that it is being released by the Arctic's snowpack in the changing polar climate, according to research led by the University of Michigan Department of Chemistry. "Essentially, we've found this unique chemistry occurring within the Arctic snowpack that hadn't previously been observed.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 04.09.2017
Does the organic material of comets predate our Solar System ?
Does the organic material of comets predate our Solar System ?
The Rosetta space probe discovered a large amount of organic material in the nucleus of comet “Chury. In an article published by MNRAS on August 31, 2017, two French researchers advance the theory that this matter has its origin in interstellar space and predates the birth of the Solar System. The ESA's Rosetta mission, which ended in September 2016, found that organic matter made up 40% (by mass) of the nucleus of comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko, a.k.a.

Chemistry - Physics - 01.09.2017
Chemical hotspots
Chemical hotspots
Research news Chemistry live: Using a scanning tunneling microscope, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) were able for the very first time to witness in detail the activity of catalysts during an electro-chemical reaction. The measurements show that the surface structure of the catalyst has a strong influence on their activity.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.08.2017
Electricity production : when enzymes rival platinum
Electricity production : when enzymes rival platinum
Making a biocell that is as effective as a platinum fuel cell: that's the feat that researchers in the Laboratoire de Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université) have a

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 30.08.2017
Star-formation 'fuel tanks' found around distant galaxies offer insights into history of universe
Star-formation ’fuel tanks’ found around distant galaxies offer insights into history of universe
ANN ARBOR-In the early universe, brilliant starburst galaxies converted vast stores of hydrogen gas into new stars at a furious pace. The energy from this vigorous star formation took its toll on many young galaxies, blasting away much of their hydrogen gas, tamping down future star formation. For reasons that remained unclear, other young galaxies were somehow able to retain their youthful star-forming power long after similar galaxies settled into middle age.

Physics - Chemistry - 29.08.2017
Scientists Developing Innovative Techniques for High-Resolution Analysis of Hybrid Materials
Scientists Developing Innovative Techniques for High-Resolution Analysis of Hybrid Materials
In an effort to better study a promising class of materials that could energize the solar cell industry, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a new method of analyzing the material's molecular-scale structure. By combining advanced X-ray spectroscopy measurements with calculations based on fundamental "first principles" theory, researchers obtained an atomic-scale view of organo-lead halide perovskites not easily achieved with current technology.

Physics - Chemistry - 29.08.2017
Bendable crystals tie current thinking in knots
Queensland researchers have shown that single crystals, typically thought of as brittle and inelastic, are flexible enough to be bent repeatedly and even tied in a knot. Researchers from Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and The University of Queensland (UQ) determined and measured the structural mechanism behind the elasticity of the crystals down to the atomic level.

Physics - Chemistry - 28.08.2017
Coral skeletons may resist the effects of acidifying oceans
Visualization of color-coded crystal orientations in a Stylophora pistillata coral skeleton, demonstrating that coral forms via attachment of particles. The map is 280 micrometers wide, and has 60 nanometer resolution. Pupa Gilbert, Chang-Yu Sun, Cayla Stifler/UW-Madison, Matthew Marcus, Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Coral skeletons are the building blocks of diverse coral reef ecosystems, which has led to increasing concern over how these key species will cope with warming and acidifying oceans that threaten their stability.

Physics - Chemistry - 25.08.2017
Ten billion atoms in rank and file
Ten billion atoms in rank and file
Research news Each atomic layer thin, tear-resistant, and stable. Graphene is seen as the material of the future. It is ideal for e.g. producing ultra-light electronics or highly stable mechanical components. But the wafer-thin carbon layers are difficult to produce. At the Technical University of Munich (TUM), Jürgen Kraus has manufactured self-supporting graphene membranes, and at the same time systematically investigated and optimized the growth of the graphene crystals.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 25.08.2017
More inflexible than imagined
More inflexible than imagined
Oligosaccharides - chains of sugar building blocks - are essential for biological cells. Scientists had thought that these molecules were freely mobile, but an international research team has now shown that such sugar molecules can form rigid structures, previously found only in DNA and proteins. Oligosaccharides - chains of sugar building blocks - are some of the most important molecules in living creatures.

Physics - Chemistry - 24.08.2017
Finding Life: Spectral Biomarkers in Planetary Atmospheres
Physicist at Freie Universität Berlin Receives Freigeist Fellowship from the Volkswagen Foundation No 225/2017 from Aug 24, 2017 The physicist Dr. Andreas Elsaesser from Freie Universität Berlin has been granted a Freigeist Fellowship from the Volkswagen Foundation for his research project "Finding Life: Spectral Biomarkers in Planetary Atmospheres.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.08.2017
New ERC grant - using mercury to explain the universe
New ERC grant - using mercury to explain the universe
Simon Stellmer has been awarded a prestigious ERC Starting Grant. He will now use ultracold mercury atoms to investigate fundamental symmetries in nature. Why is there matter in the universe at all? To date there has been no conclusive answer to this question. Our understanding of the Big Bang is based on the assumption that equal amounts of antimatter and matter were created.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 23.08.2017
Fish recognise toxic prey
Fish recognise toxic prey
Predator animals have long been known to avoid devouring brightly coloured and patterned prey, and now an international study has revealed more about how they recognise toxic species. University of Queensland Visual Ecology Lab member Dr Karen Cheney, of the School of Biological Sciences , said researchers examined sea slugs, or nudibranchs, which had bright colour patterns to warn predators they contained toxic defences.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 22.08.2017
How a bacterium can live on methanol
How a bacterium can live on methanol
ETH Zurich researchers have identified all the genes required by a bacterium to use methanol as a food source. The results will help scientists advance the use of this resource in the field of biotechnology. Many chemists are currently researching how small carbon molecules, such as methane and methanol, can be used to generate larger molecules.

Physics - Chemistry - 22.08.2017
Quantum Ruler for Biomolecules
Quantum Ruler for Biomolecules
Quantum physics teaches us that unobserved particles may propagate through space like waves. This is philosophically intriguing and of technological relevance: a research team at the University of Vienna has demonstrated that combining experimental quantum interferometry with quantum chemistry allows deriving information about optical and electronic properties of biomolecules, here exemplified with a set of vitamins.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.08.2017
Weaving with nanothreads
Weaving with nanothreads
For the first time, ETH researchers have succeeded in applying a millennia-old method for making fabrics to create a completely organic nanoweave.

Health - Chemistry - 21.08.2017
Biochemical "fingerprints" reveal diabetes progression - Umeå University, Sweden
Researchers from Umeå University in Sweden describe a new method to study biochemical changes that occur in the pancreas during the development of diabetes. The method, recently published in Scientific Reports , is based on molecular spectroscopy and can be used to extract biochemical profiles (or "fingerprints") containing information about disease progression.

Chemistry - Physics - 15.08.2017
Researchers clarify mystery about proposed battery material
Researchers clarify mystery about proposed battery material
Battery researchers agree that one of the most promising possibilities for future battery technology is the lithium-air (or lithium-oxygen) battery, which could provide three times as much power for a given weight as today's leading technology, lithium-ion batteries. But tests of various approaches to creating such batteries have produced conflicting and confusing results, as well as controversies over how to explain them.