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Environment - 17.08.2017
More than just spilling the beans
More than just spilling the beans
Because of their high nitrogen content, spent coffee grounds are a popular garden fertilizer. Recycled in this manner, they already contribute to an environmentally friendly waste management. But they have the potential to deliver much more: a new procedure developed at the PSI allows high quality methane to be formed from spent coffee grounds.

Life Sciences - Environment - 16.08.2017
Modern genetic sequencing tools give clearer picture of how corals are related
Modern genetic sequencing tools give clearer picture of how corals are related
The documentary " Chasing Coral ,” released on Netflix in July, is a cinematic warning about how the bleaching of coral reefs may foreshadow how these marine animals will respond to climate change. Corals are key to ocean health because they support the densest, most diverse ecosystems - harboring species from turtles to algae to reef fish.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.08.2017
August: origin of chloroplast | News | University of Bristol
August: origin of chloroplast | News | University of Bristol
A new study, led by the University of Bristol, has shed new light on the origin, timing and habitat in which the chloroplast first evolved. The Earth's biosphere is fuelled by photosynthesis. During this fundamental process algae and plants capture sunlight and transform carbon dioxide into carbohydrates, splitting water and releasing oxygen.

Environment - 14.08.2017
Case study suggests new approach to urban water supply
Case study suggests new approach to urban water supply
If you live in the developed world, safe water is usually just a faucet-turn away. And yet, global warming, drought conditions, and population growth in coming decades could change that, ushering in an era of uncertain access to water. Now an MIT-based research team has evaluated those potential problems and, based on a case study in Australia, suggested an alternate approach to water planning.

Life Sciences - Environment - 09.08.2017
First winged mammals from the Jurassic period discovered | UChicago News
Two 160 million-year-old mammal fossils discovered in China show that the forerunners of mammals in the Jurassic Period evolved to glide and live in trees. With long limbs, long hand and foot fingers, and wing-like membranes for tree-to-tree gliding, Maiopatagium furculiferum and Vilevolodon diplomylos are the oldest known gliders in the long history of early mammals.

Environment - 09.08.2017
Are droughts becoming more extreme and severe?
Are droughts becoming more extreme and severe?
Today, prominent scientists throughout the country released a new research article on global patterns of drought recovery. Illinois atmospheric scientist Atul Jain was among the experts who contributed to the report. Jain talked about the study's findings with News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian .

Life Sciences - Environment - 09.08.2017
Search for life on Mars could target meteorites
Search for life on Mars could target meteorites
Australian researchers have revealed a surprising new target in the search for life on Mars. Professor Gordon Southam of the University of Queensland School of Earth and Environmental Sciences said researchers were now casting their gaze down to Earth, examining stony meteorites for clues that could help in the search for life on the red planet.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 08.08.2017
Drone tech offers new ways to manage climate change
An innovation providing key clues to how humans might manage forests and cities to cool the planet is taking flight. Cornell researchers are using drone technology to more accurately measure surface reflectivity on the landscape, a technological advance that could offer a new way to manage climate change.

Life Sciences - Environment - 07.08.2017
DNA from Viking cod bones suggests 1,000 years of European fish trade | University of Cambridge
DNA from Viking cod bones suggests 1,000 years of European fish trade | University of Cambridge
New research using DNA from the fish bone remains of Viking-era meals reveals that north Norwegians have been transporting - and possibly trading - Arctic cod into mainland Europe for a millennium. Our findings suggest that distant requirements for this Arctic protein had already begun to influence the economy and ecology of Europe in the Viking age James Barrett Norway is famed for its cod.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.08.2017
Plants learn to forget stressful weather events to rapidly recover
A new study led by The Australian National University (ANU) has found that plants are able to forget stressful weather events to rapidly recover. The study confirms the research team's hypothesis for this work published last year, and the findings could help scientists better understand how plants and crops will cope and recover from variable weather.

Materials Science - Environment - 03.08.2017
When time ravages from within
When time ravages from within
Will the reinforced concrete bridge still be standing for years to come, or has corrosion already set in? ETH scientists have discovered that previous concrete samples were too small to allow a reliable statement on the condition of reinforced concrete. Taminabrücke opened in June this year following four years of construction.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.08.2017
A new threat to pollination : the dark side of artificial light
A new threat to pollination : the dark side of artificial light
A European team, including a researcher from the Centre d'écologie et des Sciences de la Conservation (CNRS/MNHN/UPMC), has shown for the first time the direct and indirect impacts of artificial light on flower pollination. This threat to terrestrial ecosystems comes on top of other threats such as habitat loss, pesticide use, the spread of pathogens, and climate change.

Environment - Economics / Business - 02.08.2017
Deadly heat waves could hit South Asia this century
Deadly heat waves could hit South Asia this century
In South Asia, a region of deep poverty where one-fifth of the world's people live, new research suggests that by the end of this century climate change could lead to summer heat waves with levels of heat and humidity that exceed what humans can survive without protection. There is still time to avert such severe warming if measures are implemented now to reduce the most dire consequences of global warming.

Economics / Business - Environment - 31.07.2017
Benefits of dikes outweigh costs - effective measures for reducing future flooding
Benefits of dikes outweigh costs - effective measures for reducing future flooding
In the first study of its kind, an international team of scientists - including the University of Bristol - has concluded, on a global scale, that the economic and long-term benefits of building dikes to reduce flood damage far outweigh their initial cost. They found that in many parts of the world, it is even possible to reduce the economic damage from river floods in the future to below today's levels, even when climate change, growing populations, and urbanisation are taken into account.

Materials Science - Environment - 26.07.2017
Not air con, but a cooling curtain
Not air con, but a cooling curtain
Climate change is leading to ever higher temperatures and aridity in many areas, making efficient room cooling increasingly important.

Civil Engineering - Environment - 25.07.2017
Rainforest metropolis casts 1,000 km shadow on wildlife
Rainforest metropolis casts 1,000 km shadow on wildlife
Urban food demand in the Amazon could be hitting wildlife up to 1,000 km away from the city, according to new research. Rapid urbanization in the Brazilian Amazon means over 18 million people are now living in rainforest towns and cities but the impact of this demographic change on wildlife harvested for food, is largely unknown.

Environment - Philosophy - 25.07.2017
Could spraying particles into marine clouds help cool the planet?
Could spraying particles into marine clouds help cool the planet?
The idea of geoengineering, also known as climate engineering, is very controversial. But as greenhouse gases continue to accumulate in our atmosphere, scientists are beginning to look at possible emergency measures. A new University of Washington study looks at the idea of marine cloud brightening , which a UW group is investigating as a promising strategy to offset global warming.

Environment - Life Sciences - 25.07.2017
Habitat loss, climate threaten eastern forest birds
Human-caused habitat loss looms as the greatest threat to some North American breeding birds over the next few decades. The problem will be most severe on their wintering grounds, according to a new study published July 24 in the journal Global Change Biology. By the end of this century, the study's authors say, predicted changes in rainfall and temperature will compound the problem for birds that breed in eastern North America and winter in Central America.

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.07.2017
Pinpointing sources of water pollution with a robotic eel
Pinpointing sources of water pollution with a robotic eel
Researchers from EPFL, together with other institutes, have developed a robotic eel that swims through contaminated water to find the source of the pollution.

Health - Environment - 25.07.2017
Noise pollution loudest in black neighborhoods, segregated cities
Noise pollution loudest in black neighborhoods, segregated cities
!- Start of DoubleClick Floodlight Tag: Please do not remove Activity name of this tag: UCB001CP Retargeting URL of the webpage where the tag is expected to be placed: http://unknown This tag must be placed between the As the number of white residents in a neighborhood declines, noise rises. But noise pollution is inescapable in segregated cities, where noise pollution is worse for everyone, according to the first breakdown of noise exposure along racial, ethnic and socioeconomic lines in the United States.
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