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Earth Sciences - Environment - 19.07.2017
Artifacts suggest humans arrived in Australia earlier than thought
Artifacts suggest humans arrived in Australia earlier than thought
When and how the first humans made their way to Australia has been an evolving story. While it is accepted that humans appeared in Africa some 200,000 years ago, scientists in recent years have placed the approximate date of human settlement in Australia further and further back in time, as part of ongoing questions about the timing, the routes and the means of migration out of Africa.

Environment - 19.07.2017
Pangolins at 'huge risk' as study reveals dramatic increases in hunting across Central Africa
Pangolins at ’huge risk’ as study reveals dramatic increases in hunting across Central Africa
Pangolins at 'huge risk' as study reveals dramatic increases in hunting across Central Africa The hunting of pangolins, the world's most illegally traded mammal, has increased by 150 percent in Central African forests from 1970s to 2014, according to a new study led by the University of Sussex. The first-ever study of its kind , published in Conservation Letters , shows the true scale of local pangolin exploitation across the continent.

Physics - Environment - 18.07.2017
Non-toxic alternative for next-generation solar cells
Non-toxic alternative for next-generation solar cells
Researchers have demonstrated how a non-toxic alternative to lead could form the basis of next-generation solar cells. We're just scratching the surface of what these compounds can do. Robert Hoye The team of researchers, from the University of Cambridge and the United States, have used theoretical and experimental methods to show how bismuth - the so-called 'green element' which sits next to lead on the periodic table, could be used in low-cost solar cells.

Environment - 17.07.2017
Unbalanced wind farm planning exacerbates fluctuations
Unbalanced wind farm planning exacerbates fluctuations
If European countries cooperated better in the field of wind energy, wind power output would fluctuate less. This is the conclusion reached by a group of energy and climate researchers at ETH Zürich and Imperial College London, who for the first time have combined a long-term analysis of predominant weather patterns with Europe-wide wind electricity generation.

Environment - 17.07.2017
Bottom-trawling techniques leave different traces on the seabed
Bottom-trawling techniques leave different traces on the seabed
Fishing fleets around the world rely on nets towed along the bottom to capture fish. Roughly one-fifth of the fish eaten globally are caught by this method, known as bottom trawling, which has been criticized for its effects on the marine environment. An international group has taken a close look at how different types of bottom trawling affect the seabed.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.07.2017
Jackdaws flap their wings to save energy
Jackdaws flap their wings to save energy
For the first time, researchers have observed that birds that fly actively and flap their wings save energy. Biologists at Lund University in Sweden have now shown that jackdaws minimise their energy consumption when they lift off and fly, because the feathers on their wing tips create several small vortices instead of a single large one.

Administration - Environment - 14.07.2017
Bornean orangutans in decline despite conservation efforts
Bornean orangutans in decline despite conservation efforts
A population trend analysis of Bornean orangutans reveals that, despite decades of conservation work, the species is declining rapidly - at a rate of 25 per cent over the past 10 years. University of Queensland School of Biological Sciences researcher Dr Truly Santika , an Indonesian statistician and researcher at the ARC Centre of Centre for Environmental Decisions (CEED), led the study on the critically endangered Bornean orangutans.

Environment - History / Archeology - 13.07.2017
Diet of the ancient people of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) shows adaptation and resilience not 'ecocide'
Diet of the ancient people of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) shows adaptation and resilience not ’ecocide’
Research by an international team, led by the University of Bristol, has shed new light on the fate of the ancient people of Rapa Nui (Easter Island). It had been proposed that vast forests of giant palm trees were cut down by the people of Rapa Nui leaving them among other things without canoes. With no canoes, they could no longer fish so they ate chickens, rats and agricultural crops.

Chemistry - Environment - 12.07.2017
Stress worsens effects of toxic chemicals in pregnant women
Stress worsens effects of toxic chemicals in pregnant women
!- Start of DoubleClick Floodlight Tag: Please do not remove Activity name of this tag: UCB001CP Retargeting URL of the webpage where the tag is expected to be placed: http://unknown This tag must be placed between the When a pregnant woman suffers from stress, she's more likely to have a low-birth-weight baby than a non-stressed pregnant woman if both are exposed to the same toxic chemicals, according to the first study examining the combined impact of stress and environmental chemicals on fetal development.

Civil Engineering - Environment - 11.07.2017
Caterpillars key to urban blue tits’ low breeding
Many animal species suffer reduced reproductive success in urban habitats, despite wide-spread supplementation of breeding and feeding opportunities. In some years, the breeding success of city birds is devastatingly low. Biologists have now shown conclusively that in urban blue tits, reduced breeding success is linked to poor nestling diet and in particular to scarcity of caterpillars, their preferred nestling food.

Health - Environment - 11.07.2017
Researchers survey strategies to improve end of life quality
Globally, 20 million people per year require palliative care at the end of their lives. A new study by Cornell researchers has identified strategies that could help improve their quality of life, especially as their lives come to an end. The team surveyed 133 staff and volunteers who provide end-of-life care to patients in home and institutional settings for four organizations in two counties in upstate New York.

Health - Environment - 11.07.2017
Researcher surveys strategies to improve end of life quality
Globally, 20 million people per year require palliative care at the end of their lives. A new study by Cornell researchers has identified strategies that could help improve their quality of life, especially as their lives come to an end. The team surveyed 133 staff and volunteers who provide end-of-life care to patients in home and institutional settings for four organizations in two counties in upstate New York.

Life Sciences - Environment - 10.07.2017
Humpback whales flap their foreflippers
Stanford researchers have found that humpback whales flap their foreflippers like penguins or sea lions. This unexpected observation helps explain whale maneuvering and could improve designs inspired by their movement. When Jeremy Goldbogen , an assistant professor of biology at Stanford University, affixed recording devices to humpback whales, it was with the hope of learning more about how the animals move in their natural environment - deep underwater and far from human's ability to observe.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 06.07.2017
CERN experiment discovers a new, very charming particle
A new study has found a previously undetected potential health risk from the high concentration of small particles found in a boomerang-like return of a volcanic plume. A team of scientists from the Universities of Birmingham, Leeds, Oxford, Cambridge, King's College London, Met Office, Environment Agency of Iceland, and Icelandic Meteorological Office worked in collaboration in the study of the Icelandic Holuhraun lava field eruption.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 06.07.2017
Rising temperatures are curbing ocean's capacity to store carbon
Rising temperatures are curbing ocean’s capacity to store carbon
If there is anywhere for carbon dioxide to disappear in large quantities from the atmosphere, it is into the Earth's oceans. There, huge populations of plankton can soak up carbon dioxide from surface waters and gobble it up as a part of photosynthesis, generating energy for their livelihood. When plankton die, they sink thousands of feet, taking with them the carbon that was once in the atmosphere, and stashing it in the deep ocean.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 06.07.2017
Caspian Sea Evaporating As Temperatures Rise, Study Finds
The Caspian Sea as seen from the International Space Station in 2015. A new study finds water levels in the Caspian Sea dropped nearly 7 centimeters (3 inches) per year from 1996 to 2015. The current Caspian Sea level is only about 1 meter (3 feet) above the historic low level it reached in the late 1970s.

Environment - 05.07.2017
Remote Amazonian cities more vulnerable to climate change
Remote Amazonian cities more vulnerable to climate change
Amazonians living in remote cities are more vulnerable to flooding and droughts than more accessible centres, researchers at Lancaster University have discovered. Roadless cities have been found to be more vulnerable to the effects of flooding, because they tend to be less-developed and have inadequate sanitation, exposing inhabitants to environmental pollution and contaminated water.

Environment - Materials Science - 05.07.2017
Concrete from wood
Concrete from wood
Researchers from the National Research Programme "Resource Wood" have developed a type of concrete that largely consists of wood. The building material offers the construction industry new possibilities and is based in large part on renewable resources. Houses can be made of wood, as they were in the past - or of concrete, as they are today.

Life Sciences - Environment - 05.07.2017
Tiger sharks need international protection
Tiger sharks need international protection
Tiger sharks roam huge distances across the Indo-Pacific, contributing to a single, large population, a study has found. The University of Queensland's Dr Bonnie Holmes said sampling from tiger sharks ( G. cuvier ) at seven locations across the region revealed little genetic differentiation from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 05.07.2017
Habitat loss a critical threat in mammal extinction
Habitat loss a critical threat in mammal extinction
Researchers have long assumed habitat fragmentation contributes to animal extinction risk, but until now, they have not been able to measure it on a global scale for a major group of animals. In a first-of-its-kind study , a research team led by Colorado State University (CSU), and involving research from The University of Queensland, successfully measured habitat fragmentation for more than 4000 species of land-dwelling mammals.
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