news 2017

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Results 3041 - 3060 of 3121.


Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 12.01.2017
Putting chromosomes through the shredder
Putting chromosomes through the shredder
When a certain human enzyme is left uncontrolled, it breaks up chromosomes into tiny pieces. This is damaging to cells, but useful for killing tumours. ETH researchers have now come to understand the underlying mechanism. Our cells contain the enzyme MUS81; this is called on in emergencies, for example, when cells are unable to replicate because the DNA-replication machinery gets tangled up in strands of DNA.

Environment - Life Sciences - 12.01.2017
Climate change could kill off parasites, destabilizing ecosystems
Climate change could kill off parasites, destabilizing ecosystems
Photogenic animals, from polar bears to people, aren't the only creatures under threat from global climate change. A new review led by UC Berkeley suggests the phenomenon threatens parasites with extinction, which could have big consequences for ecosystems. The vast majority of research into parasites and environment change focuses on how hosts, particularly humans, will be harmed.

Health - 12.01.2017
Gastric acid suppressants linked to hospitalisation
We found that taking PPIs increased the risk of hospitalisation with infectious gastroenteritis by up to 70 per cent. New research has found a link between popular heartburn drugs and an increase in the risk of infectious gastroenteritis - an illness that results in 13.1 million lost days of work in Australia a year.

Mathematics - 11.01.2017
Young people could be limiting future salaries by dismissing A-level maths
England has one of the lowest levels of post-16 mathematics engagement among developed countries, according to international comparisons. This is despite the fact that mathematics qualifications such as A-level maths are linked to higher salaries, as reported in new research. In 2011 the Secretary of State for Education called for the 'vast majority' of young people to be studying mathematics up to 18 by the end of the decade.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2017
Supporting actors take lead role as our brains age
Supporting actors take lead role as our brains age
The main changes in our brains as we get older are in the brain cells with a supporting role, called glial cells, British scientists have found. The surprising finding in a study by researchers at UCL and the Francis Crick Institute is published in the journal Cell Reports. The researchers also found that the greatest changes in glial cells as we age are in the brain regions most often damaged by neurodegenerative disease, like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

Health - 11.01.2017
Patients with long term conditions overestimate life expectancy
Patients with long term conditions overestimate life expectancy
A review of studies examining perceived life expectancy among people with long term health conditions has found patients may overestimate their life expectancy. A review of studies examining perceived life expectancy among people with long term health conditions has found patients may overestimate their life expectancy.

Health - 11.01.2017
Preschoolers with autism show gains after play-based program
Preschoolers with autism show gains after play-based program
Intervention developed at UCLA proves successful even outside of controlled clinical setting Sarah C.P. Williams Treatments for autism spectrum disorder that appear promising in a research lab often don't work as well in real-life settings. But one intervention, developed over the past 15 years by UCLA scientists, has been shown to be effective in reducing symptoms of autism in preschool-age children, even when it's carried out in facilities with less substantial resources and by mostly young teaching assistants.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 11.01.2017
150 years of British history
What could be learnt about the world if you could read the news from over 100 local newspapers for a period of 150 years? This is what a team of researchers from Cardiff University and the University of Bristol have done using of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to analyse 150 years of British regional newspapers.

Career - Economics / Business - 11.01.2017
Research zeroing in on Fresno, shows $15 California minimum wage has big impact on pay, none on jobs
Research zeroing in on Fresno, shows $15 California minimum wage has big impact on pay, none on jobs
Berkeley – For the first time, economists at the University of California, Berkeley have measured the likely pay and job impacts of California's scheduled statewide $15 minimum wage increase by 2023. The law will raise wages for 5.26 million workers in California over the next six years, they say.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2017
A surprise advance in the treatment of adult cancers
Researchers at the RI-MUHC have made a discovery that could improve care for about 15% of patients with head and neck cancer linked to alcohol and tobacco use A team of researchers at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) has found an epigenetic modification that might be the cause of 15% of adult cancers of the throat linked to alcohol and tobacco use.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2017
Slo-mo unwrapping of nucleosomal DNA probes protein’s role
Using X-rays to visualize DNA (dark gray) and fluorescence to monitor the histone proteins (yellow and cyan), Cornell researchers led by professor and director of applied and engineering physics Lois Pollack found that the release of histone proteins is guided by unwrapping DNA. Nucleosomes are tightly packed bunches of DNA and protein which, when linked together as chromatin, form each of the 46 chromosomes found in human cells.

Health - 11.01.2017
IMF lending conditions curb healthcare investment in West Africa, study finds
IMF lending conditions curb healthcare investment in West Africa, study finds
Research shows budget reduction targets and public sector caps, insisted on by the IMF as loan conditions, result in reduced health spending and medical 'brain drain' in developing West African nations.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 11.01.2017
The best way to include fossils in the 'tree of life'
The best way to include fossils in the ’tree of life’
A team of scientists from the University of Bristol has suggested that we need to use a fresh approach to analyse relationships in the fossil record to show how all living and extinct species are related in the 'tree of life'. The researchers from the Bristol Palaeobiology Group , part of the School of Earth Sciences , studied the best way to understand relationships of extinct animals to other extinct species as well as those alive today.

Life Sciences - 11.01.2017
Bait and switch: UCLA study finds fish fraud runs rampant
Bait and switch: UCLA study finds fish fraud runs rampant
Whether to turn a profit or skirt environmental regulations, half the time what's on the menu at L.A. sushi restaurants differs from what's on your plate Alison Hewitt Next time you go out for sushi in Los Angeles, don't bother ordering halibut. Chances are it's not halibut at all. A new study from researchers at UCLA and Loyola Marymount University checked the DNA of fish ordered at 26 Los Angeles sushi restaurants from 2012 through 2015, and found that 47 percent of sushi was mislabeled.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2017
Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels
Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels
Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels. This is what has been demonstrated by an international team coordinated by researchers from the Gipsa-Lab (CNRS/Grenoble INP/Grenoble Alpes University), the Laboratory of Cognitive Psychology (CNRS/AMU), and the Laboratory of Anatomy at the University of Montpellier, using acoustic analyses of vocalizations coupled with an anatomical study of the tongue muscles and the modeling of the acoustic potential of the vocal tract in monkeys.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.01.2017
High-sugar diet programmes a short lifespan in flies
High-sugar diet programmes a short lifespan in flies
Flies with a history of eating a high sugar diet live shorter lives, even after their diet improves. This is because the unhealthy diet drives long-term reprogramming of gene expression, according to a UCL-led team of researchers. The study, published today in Cell Reports , discovered that the action of a gene called FOXO is inhibited in flies given a high sugar diet in early life, causing long-term effects.

Economics / Business - Career - 10.01.2017
America's best child poverty-fighting program' It's spelled EITC
America‘s best child poverty-fighting program’ It’s spelled EITC
New research from UC Berkeley shows that the Earned Income Tax Credit is the most effective poverty-fighting program for children in the U.S, and encourages families to work more because it rewards additional earnings. The work by Berkeley professor of economics and public policy Hilary Hoynes and others, which assesses the impacts of anti-poverty programs, is highlighted in a policy brief for the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment.  'This is the first assessment of both the direct and indirect impact of the EITC on poverty.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.01.2017
Autism biomarker seen as boon for new treatments
FINDINGS Researchers at the UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment have identified a signature brain-wave pattern for children with autism spectrum disorder related to a genetic condition known as Dup15q syndrome. The research team noted that this signature is among the first quantitative biomarkers identified in electroencephalogram tests discovered for any syndrome highly associated with autism spectrum disorder.

Social Sciences - 10.01.2017
Frankly, do we give a damn...' Study finds links between swearing and honesty
Frankly, do we give a damn...’ Study finds links between swearing and honesty
It's long been associated with anger and coarseness but profanity can have another, more positive connotation. Psychologists have learned that people who frequently curse are being more honest. Writing in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science a team of researchers from the Netherlands, the UK, the USA and Hong Kong report that people who use profanity are less likely to be associated with lying and deception.

Health - 10.01.2017
New model predicts when people are willing to try new things
New model predicts when people are willing to try new things
A new model to predict when people are most likely to try different products has been developed by scientists at UCL and dunnhumby, a customer science company. The research could help to direct public health interventions aimed at encouraging healthier choices. The team analysed anonymous purchase data from over 280,000 shoppers who regularly bought products in six categories: beers, breads, coffees, toilet papers, washing detergents and yogurts.