news 2017

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Results 3081 - 3100 of 3121.


Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2017
Hunting hidden supermassive black holes
Hunting hidden supermassive black holes
Monster black holes sometimes play a cosmic game of hide and seek, shrouding themselves from view behind giant clouds of gas and dust, according to new research. Scientists believe supermassive black holes lurk at the centres of most big galaxies, but many are hidden from the view of most telescopes.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 09.01.2017
Sea shells are as unique as fingerprints
Sea shells are as unique as fingerprints
University of Queensland scientists have solved a riddle that has puzzled beach-goers and collectors around the world - why are conch shell colours and patterns so diverse? The researchers examined the molecular underpinnings behind the array of shell patterns. UQ School of Biological Sciences researcher Professor Bernie Degnan said the team investigated the complex gene networks that controlled the secretions of chemicals and proteins in molluscs to create shells.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 09.01.2017
Sea shells are as unique as fingerprints
Sea shells are as unique as fingerprints
University of Queensland scientists have solved a riddle that has puzzled beach-goers and collectors around the world - why are conch shell colours and patterns so diverse? The researchers examined the molecular underpinnings behind the array of shell patterns. UQ School of Biological Sciences researcher Professor Bernie Degnan said the team investigated the complex gene networks that controlled the secretions of chemicals and proteins in molluscs to create shells.

Life Sciences - Physics - 08.01.2017
Sneak peek into the nanoworld of brain cells
Sneak peek into the nanoworld of brain cells
A University of Queensland team is among the first in neuroscience to see the brain's tiniest molecules in action and plot their movements. Professor Fred Meunier's laboratory at the Clem Jones Centre for Ageing Dementia Research at the Queensland Brain Institute has developed a breakthrough technique in super-resolution microscopy.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.01.2017
Mediterranean diet may protect your brain in old age, new finding suggests
Mediterranean diet may protect your brain in old age, new finding suggests
Could a Mediterranean diet keep your brain young? That is the tantalising finding from a study out this week. Writing on The Conversation website, Professor Paul Fletcher from the Department of Psychiatry investigates the findings. Amid the contention about diets and detoxes, sugar and fats, there is at least general agreement that a Mediterranean diet - fruit, vegetables, olive oil, grains, fish - is a good thing.

Health - Psychology - 06.01.2017
CDC guidelines for HIV prevention regimen may not go far enough, study suggests
CDC guidelines for HIV prevention regimen may not go far enough, study suggests
A new study from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health suggests modifying federal health guidelines related to the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV transmission because current standards could miss some people who should be on it. Pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is a measure that has proven to be highly effective in preventing HIV transmission during unprotected sex.

Social Sciences - 06.01.2017
Your health! The benefits of social drinking
New research shows that moderate alcohol consumption may be linked to improved wellbeing, thanks to the improved social interaction associated with having a drink with friends at a local pub. While most studies warn of the health risks of alcohol consumption, researchers at the University of Oxford have looked at whether having a drink may play a role in improving social cohesion, given its long association with human social activities.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.01.2017
The Case of the 'Missing Link' Neutron Star
The Case of the ’Missing Link’ Neutron Star
Like anthropologists piecing together the human family tree, astronomers have found that a misfit "skeleton" of a star may link two different kinds of stellar remains. The mysterious object, called PSR J1119-6127, has been caught behaving like two distinct objects'a radio pulsar and a magnetar'and could be important to understanding their evolution.

Mathematics - Chemistry - 06.01.2017
Researchers design one of the strongest, lightest materials known
Researchers design one of the strongest, lightest materials known
A team of researchers at MIT has designed one of the strongest lightweight materials known, by compressing and fusing flakes of graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon. The new material, a sponge-like configuration with a density of just 5 percent, can have a strength 10 times that of steel. In its two-dimensional form, graphene is thought to be the strongest of all known materials.

Law - 06.01.2017
Brixton Road becomes first place in London to breach Nitrogen dioxide limits
Data from King's College London's Environmental Research Group has shown Brixton Road has become the first place in London to breach objectives for nitrogen dioxide for 2017. UK objectives and EU limits stipulate a maximum nitrogen dioxide concentration that must not to be exceeded for more than 18 hours over the whole year.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.01.2017
Bacteria resists 'last-resort' antibiotic
Bacteria resists ’last-resort’ antibiotic
An international research team, led by the University of Bristol, has provided the first clues to understand how the mcr-1 gene protects bacteria from colistin - a 'last resort' antibiotic used to treat life-threatening bacterial infections that do not respond to other treatment options.

Health - Administration - 06.01.2017
Risk of long-term disability in older adults who visit the ED
Risk of long-term disability in older adults who visit the ED
Older adults who go to the emergency department (ED) for an illness or injury are at increased risk for disability and decline in physical abilities up to six months later, according to a study by Yale researchers. The study was published on Jan. 6, 2017, in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. Most adults aged 65 and older who visit the emergency department each year are treated and sent home.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.01.2017
How ancestry shapes our immune cells
How ancestry shapes our immune cells
A genetic variant that is particularly prevalent in people of African ancestry confers protection against malaria. LMU researchers have now shown how it modulates the properties of white blood cells that play a major role in immune defenses and inflammation. Virtually the entire population of sub-Saharan Africa, and some 70% of African Americans, carry a gene variant (allele) which results in a trait referred to as Duffy-negative.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.01.2017
Bacteria deployed to destroy mosquito-borne dengue can’t take the heat
A promising strain of bacteria that stops dengue transmission in mosquitoes struggles to survive hot conditions, new research from the University of Melbourne has revealed. But there is a silver lining, because researchers now know which particular strains will survive the steamy tropics, where disease-bearing mosquitoes thrive.

Economics / Business - Health - 05.01.2017
Job clubs could help reduce depression in people through unemployment
Job clubs could help reduce depression in people through unemployment
Job clubs could be effective in reducing depression in people experiencing the effects of unemployment, particularly those at high risk of depression, an NIHR-funded study has found. Many people feeling depressed and anxious because of financial hardship do not seek help from their GP.

Health - 05.01.2017
Older lung cancer patients face significant treatment burden
Older lung cancer patients face significant treatment burden
Depending on the type of treatment older lung cancer patients receive, they can spend an average of one in three days interacting with the healthcare system in the first 60 days after surgery or radiation therapy, according to a study by Yale researchers. The findings are published in current issue of Journal of Oncology Practice.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.01.2017
Development of face recognition entails brain tissue growth
Development of face recognition entails brain tissue growth
A central tenet in neuroscience has been that the amount of brain tissue goes in one direction throughout our lives - from too much to just enough. A new study finds that in some cases the brain can add tissue as well. People are born with brains riddled with excess neural connections. Those are slowly pruned back until early childhood when, scientists thought, the brain's structure becomes relatively stable.

Chemistry - 05.01.2017
South American fossil tomatillos show nightshades evolved earlier than thought
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Delicate fossil remains of tomatillos found in Patagonia, Argentina, show that this branch of the economically important family that also includes potatoes, peppers, tobacco, petunias and tomatoes existed 52 million years ago, long before the dates previously ascribed to these species, according to an international team of scientists.

Life Sciences - 05.01.2017
From Sight to Recognition: Researchers Map How the Brain Processes Faces
By Shilo Rea Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are getting closer to understanding how your brain perceives faces and recognizes old friends you haven't seen in years. In a study published in the Dec. 26, 2016, issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), scientists used highly sophisticated brain imaging tools and computational methods to measure the real-time brain processes that convert the appearance of a face into the recognition of an individual.

Health - 05.01.2017
Lung cancer patients may benefit from delayed chemotherapy after surgery
Lung cancer patients may benefit from delayed chemotherapy after surgery
A new Yale study suggests that patients with a common form of lung cancer may still benefit from delayed chemotherapy started up to four months after surgery, according to the researchers. The study was published online by JAMA Oncology on Jan. Each year, more people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined.