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Innovation - Health - 01.12.2017
Cannabis linked to bipolar symptoms in young adults
Adolescent cannabis use is an independent risk factor for future hypomania - often experienced as part of bipolar disorder - finds new research led by University of Warwick. First research to robustly test the association between adolescent cannabis use and hypomania (periods of elated mood, over-active and excited behaviour, reduced need for sleep) in early adulthood.

Computer Science - Health - 01.12.2017
How can humans keep the upper hand on artificial intelligence?
How can humans keep the upper hand on artificial intelligence?
EPFL researchers have shown how human operators can maintain control over a system comprising several agents that are guided by artificial intelligence. In artificial intelligence (AI), machines carry out specific actions, observe the outcome, adapt their behavior accordingly, observe the new outcome, adapt their behavior once again, and so on, learning from this iterative process.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.12.2017
3D-printed minifactories
3D-printed minifactories
ETH researchers have developed a biocompatible ink for 3D printing using living bacteria. This makes it possible to produce biological materials capable of breaking down toxic substances or producing high-purity cellulose for biomedical applications. There will soon be nothing that cannot be produced with 3D printing.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.11.2017
Versatile cancer drugs
Versatile cancer drugs
Research news Medications which block enzymes belonging to the kinase family, are among the most effective pharmaceuticals for targeted cancer therapies. Scientists at the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have examined 243 kinase inhibitors which are either approved drugs or have been tested in clinical trials.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.11.2017
Study resolves dispute about the origin of animals
Study resolves dispute about the origin of animals
New research led by the University of Bristol has resolved evolutionary biology's most-heated debate, revealing it is the morphologically simple sponges, rather than the anatomically complex comb jellies, which represent the oldest lineage of living animals. Recent genomic analyses have "flip-flopped" between whether sponges or comb jellies are our deepest ancestors, leading experts to suggest available data might not have the power to resolve this specific problem.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.11.2017
Behaviour not indicative of pain in stressed babies
Behaviour not indicative of pain in stressed babies
In stressed newborn babies, behaviour alone is not a reliable way of assessing pain, according to new UCL and UCLH research. The study, published today in Current Biology and funded by the Medical Research Council UK, found that hospitalised newborns, who are already stressed by their environment have a much larger pain response in their brain following a routine clinical skin lance than non-stressed babies.

Pharmacology - Health - 30.11.2017
Los Alamos research fundamental to first efficacy study for mosaic HIV-1 preventive vaccine
Los Alamos research fundamental to first efficacy study for mosaic HIV-1 preventive vaccine
The HIV-1 mosaic vaccine in the trial was originally designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory by theoretical biologist Bette Korber and her team. My life's work has been devoted to developing strategies to create a global HIV vaccine; mosaics were a realization of one such strategy. Bette Korber Novel viral analysis approach leads to potential 'global vaccine' LOS ALAMOS, N.M. Nov.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.11.2017
Lifespan prolonged by inhibiting common enzyme
Lifespan prolonged by inhibiting common enzyme
The lifespans of flies and worms are prolonged by limiting the activity of an enzyme common to all animals, finds a UCL-led study. The enzyme - RNA polymerase III (Pol III) - is present in most cells across all animal species, including humans. While it is known to be essential for making proteins and for cell growth, its involvement in ageing was unexplored until now.

Health - Innovation - 30.11.2017
New techniques needed to help children with gut disease in developing countries
New techniques needed to help children with gut disease in developing countries
Imperial experts discuss a new way of combating EED, a debilitating disease in children that is prevalent in the developing world. Environmental Enteric Dysfunction , or EED, is widespread in developing countries and has severe negative impacts on children's physical and cognitive development. The condition is poorly understood, and the techniques currently used to study and identify the disease are invasive and difficult to administer.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.11.2017
A Big Data tool begins new era for biology and personalized medicine
A Big Data tool begins new era for biology and personalized medicine
Researchers from EPFL have developed a novel series of systems genetics tools to identify new links between genes and phenotypes. The work, a hallmark of EPFL's endeavors into the advancement of open science, brings biology to the cloud and sets the stage for the development of precision medicine. The study is published in Cell Systems.

Health - 29.11.2017
Twin pregnancy complications research awarded 2.2 million funding
Twin pregnancy complications research awarded 2.2 million funding
Imperial has been awarded 2.2 million grant to trial a new treatment for a potentially deadly complication that affects some twin pregnancies. Dr Christoph Lees, Head of Fetal Medicine at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and Clinical Reader in Obstetrics at Imperial College London, was awarded the funding from the Medical Research Council (MRC) to carry out the first in human trials to treat twin-twin transfusion (TTTS).

Health - Pharmacology - 29.11.2017
The first mature trees are introduced to the Green Heart
Researchers at the University of Birmingham have identified new mechanisms used by bacteria to resist infection-fighting antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance happens when bacteria evolve mechanisms to withstand the drugs which are used to treat infections. The team of experts at the University's Institute of Microbiology and Infection focussed their research on E. coli, which can cause urinary and blood stream infections.

Health - 29.11.2017
Living in a ’war zone’ linked to delivery of low birthweight babies
o Evidence for impact on other complications of pregnancy less clear o Study conducted by University of Warwick Mums-to-be living in war zones/areas of armed conflict are at heightened risk of giving birth to low birthweight babies. However the evidence for any impact on the rate of other complications of pregnancy is less clear.

Health - 29.11.2017
Marriage may help stave off dementia
Marriage may help stave off dementia
Marriage may lower the risk of developing dementia, concludes a UCL-led synthesis of the available evidence published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry . Lifelong singletons and widowers are at heightened risk of developing the disease, the findings indicate, although single status may no longer be quite the health hazard it once seemed to be, the researchers acknowledge.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.11.2017
Researchers Develop an Injectable Gel that Helps Heart Muscle Regenerate after a Heart Attack
Researchers Develop an Injectable Gel that Helps Heart Muscle Regenerate after a Heart Attack
In mammals, including humans, the cells that contract the heart muscle and enable it to beat do not regenerate after injury. After a heart attack, there is a dramatic loss of these heart muscle cells and those that survive cannot effectively replicate. With fewer of these contractile cells, known as cardiomyocytes, the heart pumps less blood with each beat, leading to the increased mortality associated with heart disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.11.2017
Eye contact with your baby helps synchronise your brainwaves
Eye contact with your baby helps synchronise your brainwaves
Making eye contact with an infant makes adults' and babies' brainwaves 'get in sync' with each other - which is likely to support communication and learning - according to researchers at the University of Cambridge.

Health - 29.11.2017
New laser technique detects soot particles in blood and urine
Researchers from UHasselt and KU Leuven have developed a brand-new method to detect soot particles in the human body. Recent research has shown that, each year, over 4.2 million individuals around the world die prematurely due to air pollution."This type of pollution can lead to a lower weight at birth, decreased cognitive functions in children, lung cancer, and respiratory diseases, among other things," says Professor Tim Nawrot (UHasselt).

Health - Social Sciences - 29.11.2017
Disability discrimination affects one in seven Australian adults
One in seven Australian adults with a disability reports experiencing discrimination due to their impairment and this discrimination can affect their health, a new study has found. Rates were higher for those who were younger, unemployed or in low-status jobs. The University of Melbourne-led research, published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health , was Australia's first population-level study of self-reported interpersonal disability-based discrimination and its relationship with health.

Pharmacology - Health - 29.11.2017
University of Birmingham launches Technical Academy
One of the UK's leading microbiologists is concerned that confusing language and a lack of specific objectives are hampering the global fight against antibiotic-resistant infections. Professor Laura Piddock , of the Institute of Microbiology and Infection, at the University of Birmingham, and her collaborators have written a report for the UK All-Party Parliamentary Group on Antibiotics.

Health - 28.11.2017
Major UK trial to help prevent bleeding from aspirin
A five-year study aiming to reduce the risk of stomach bleeding in aspirin users, led by University of Nottingham researchers, is believed to be the UK's largest interventional academic drug trial. The HEAT study, which was led by Professor Chris Hawkey in the University's School of Medicine and Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, and funded and supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), recruited more than 30,000 patients.
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