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Results 1321 - 1340 of 1405.


Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2017
Hormone can enhance brain activity associated with love and sex
Hormone can enhance brain activity associated with love and sex
The hormone kisspeptin can enhance activity in brain regions associated with sexual arousal and romantic love, according to new research. The scientists behind the early-stage study, from Imperial College London, are now keen to explore whether kisspeptin could play a part in treating some psychosexual disorders - sexual problems which are psychological in origin, and commonly occur in patients with infertility.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.01.2017
Breast cancer drugs stop working when tumours 'make their own fuel'
Breast cancer drugs stop working when tumours 'make their own fuel’
Scientists have discovered why a type of breast cancer drug stops working in some patients. The early-stage findings , from an international team led by Imperial College London and the European Institute of Oncology in Milan , reveal some breast tumours evolve to make their own 'fuel supply', rendering treatments powerless.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.01.2017
What makes drug for ulcerative colitis tick
ANN ARBOR'For approximately 70 years, physicians have used a medication containing the active agent mesalamine to treat ulcerative colitis, but little was known about how the drug targeted the inflammatory bowel disease. Now, a group of University of Michigan researchers have identified one of the ways by which mesalamine works.

Chemistry - Health - 23.01.2017
New technique IDs micropollutants in New York waterways
Damian Helbling, left, and Amy Pochodylo, M.S. '14, examine samples of New York waterways in a search for previously undetected micropollutants. Cornell engineers hope that clean water runs deep. They have developed a new technique to test for a wide range of micropollutants in lakes, rivers and other potable water sources that vastly outperforms conventional methods.

Health - Chemistry - 23.01.2017
Opinion: How dangerous is burnt toast?
Opinion: How dangerous is burnt toast?
A new campaign is warning people that burning some food, such as toast, is a potential cancer risk. Here, the evidence for this claim is explored by David Spiegelhalter, Professor of the Public Understanding of Risk at the new Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication.

Health - 23.01.2017
Yale faculty lead a four-city effort to study best practices for opioid addiction
Yale faculty lead a four-city effort to study best practices for opioid addiction
Yale investigators Dr. Gail D'Onofrio and Dr. David Fiellin are leading a NIH-funded study to examine implementation of evidence-based practices for patients with opioid-use disorder coming in to emergency departments (ED). The study will assess practices in New York, Seattle, Cincinnati, and Baltimore.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2017
New clue towards understanding why prion strain virulence varies depending on which cells are infected
New clue towards understanding why prion strain virulence varies depending on which cells are infected
Prion strains are more or less virulent depending on the population of cells they infect. The reason for these different virulence levels remains largely unknown. Researchers at INRA recently took a decisive step closer to explaining these variations. They observed that certain strains were favoured over others depending on the level of PrP protein, which forms the substrate of brain cells in mice.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2017
Brain cells mobilize sugar in response to increased activity
New research is providing insights into why the brain is so reliant on sugar to function. In a study published Jan. 19 in Neuron, a research team led by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators discovered that brain cells recruit a specific sugar, glucose, to fuel the transmission of electrical signals that enable people to think, breathe and walk.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.01.2017
The brains of alcohol dependents and binge drinkers may recover differently
The brains of alcohol dependents and binge drinkers may recover differently
Cells that clear damage in the brain are less active in alcohol-dependent patients after withdrawal than in models of adolescent binge-drinking. People who have become alcohol-dependent suffer symptoms of withdrawal while abstaining from drink. These include cognitive impairment, such as memory problems, making plans and being able to act flexibly.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.01.2017
Brain's connections which keep related memories distinct from each other, identified in new study
Brain’s connections which keep related memories distinct from each other, identified in new study
Neuroscientists at the University of Bristol are a step closer to understanding how the connections in our brain which control our episodic memory work in sync to make some memories stronger than others. The findings reveal a previously unsuspected division of memory function in the pathways between two areas of the brain, and suggest that certain subnetworks within the brain work separately, to enhance the distinctiveness of memories.

Health - 20.01.2017
Food additive E171: first findings of oral exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles
Food additive E171: first findings of oral exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles
Researchers from INRA and their partners 1 have studied the effects of oral exposure to titanium dioxide, an additive (E171) commonly used in foodstuffs, especially confectionary. They have shown for the first time that E171 crosses the intestinal barrier in animals and reaches other parts of the body.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.01.2017
Bacterial discovery solves 20-year-old molecular paleontology mystery
A fatty molecule once thought to be unique to flowering plants has turned up in bacteria skimmed from the Adriatic Sea and may provide biotech insights. A fatty molecule thought to be unique to flowering plants has turned up in bacteria skimmed from the Adriatic Sea. The surprising finding solves a 20-year-old paleontological mystery and could affect how scientists interpret the presence of this molecule in the ecological record.

Health - 19.01.2017
Women’s cognitive decline begins earlier than previously believed
FINDINGS UCLA researchers have found that mental sharpness in women begins to decline as early as their 50s. The study, which followed the same group of healthy women for 10 years after menopause, found that their average decline in mental processing ability was 5 percent during the decade-long period.

Health - Physics - 19.01.2017
Added value for cancer patients
Added value for cancer patients
For more than 30 years, cancer patients have been coming to the small locality of Villigen on the Aare River.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.01.2017
Study pinpoints how skin cells’ identity can be disassembled to create stem cells
FINDINGS Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have published a study demonstrating how specialized proteins are able to change the identity, or cellular characteristics, of skin cells and create induced pluripotent stem cells, which have the ability to turn into any cell type in the body.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.01.2017
Tool to map gene's 'social network' sheds light on function, interactions and drug efficacy
Tool to map gene’s ‘social network’ sheds light on function, interactions and drug efficacy
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Although the human genome has been mapped, many questions remain about how genes are regulated, how they interact with one another, and what function some genes serve. A new tool developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology distills the huge amount of genomic data into gene networks that can point to the function of genes, highlighting relationships between genes and offering insights into disease, treatment and gene analogs across species.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.01.2017
Blood test can predict life or death outcome for patients with Ebola virus disease
Blood test can predict life or death outcome for patients with Ebola virus disease
Scientists have identified a 'molecular barcode' in the blood of patients with Ebola virus disease that can predict whether they are likely to survive or die from the viral infection. A team at the University of Liverpool, in collaboration with Public Health England, Boston University and other international partners, used blood samples taken from infected and recovering patients during the 2013-2016 West Africa outbreak to identify gene products that act as strong predictors of patient outcome.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.01.2017
Latest research offers hope for patients with inflammatory diseases
Latest research offers hope for patients with inflammatory diseases
University of Queensland researchers have discovered a molecular trigger for inflammation that could lead to new treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and neurodegenerative diseases. UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB) researcher Professor Jennifer Stow said targeting this trigger - a protein called SCIMP, could reduce or 'switch off' inflammation.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.01.2017
Delirium could accelerate dementia-related mental decline
Delirium could accelerate dementia-related mental decline
When hospitalised, people can become acutely confused and disorientated. This condition, known as delirium, affects a quarter of older patients and new research by UCL and University of Cambridge shows it may have long-lasting consequences, including accelerating the dementia process. The study, published today in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, is the first to show the multiplying effects of delirium and dementia in these patients.

Electroengineering - Health - 18.01.2017
Heart attack scars found to conduct electricity under right conditions
Heart attack scars found to conduct electricity under right conditions
Scientists from Imperial have discovered that, contrary to previous understanding, heart scar tissue can conduct electricity following a heart attack. These findings in mice, if confirmed in humans, would have major implications for heart attack survivors, and for patients with an irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation.