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Health - 13.01.2017
High levels of hospital-acquired infection on children's intensive care wards
High levels of hospital-acquired infection on children’s intensive care wards
A new study shows 'unacceptably high' rates of hospital-acquired infections among children in the UK and Europe. The report, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases , found that one in six children in paediatric intensive care units, and one in ten babies in neonatal intensive care units had developed hospital infections while being treated.

Health - 13.01.2017
Statins may reduce the risk of blood clots in the vein
Statins may reduce the risk of blood clots in the vein
A study published by Dr Setor Kunutsor of the Musculoskeletal Research Unit in the School of Clinical Sciences, with colleagues from the University of Leicester, has confirmed that statins could play an important role in reducing the risk of venous thromboembolism. Statins are groups of medications that reduce blood cholesterol levels and are commonly used to prevent heart disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.01.2017
Older mothers more likely to face birth complications
Pregnant women over 35 years old are more likely to have complications at birth due to delayed and longer labour stages, according to new research from King's College London. It is well known that older mothers are more likely to experience complicated births. In a new study published today in The Journal of Physiology, researchers have identified physiological changes in the body that could explain this.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 13.01.2017
New urine test can quickly detect whether a person has a healthy diet
New urine test can quickly detect whether a person has a healthy diet
Scientists have developed a urine test that measures the health of a person's diet. The five-minute test measures biological markers in urine created by the breakdown of foods such as red meat, chicken, fish and fruit and vegetables. The analysis, developed by researchers from Imperial College London, Newcastle University and Aberystwyth University, also gives an indication of how much fat, sugar, fibre and protein a person has eaten.

Health - 12.01.2017
Malaria infection depends on number of parasites, not number of mosquito bites
Malaria infection depends on number of parasites, not number of mosquito bites
For the first time, researchers have shown that the number of parasites each mosquito carries influences the chance of successful malaria infection. The finding has implications for vaccine development and studies into how the disease spreads in the field. The findings, from scientists at Imperial College London, may also explain why the only registered malaria vaccine, RTS,S , has had only partial efficacy in recent trials.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.01.2017
Wearable sensors can tell when you are getting sick
New research from Stanford shows that fitness monitors and other wearable biosensors can tell when an individual's heart rate, skin temperature and other measures are abnormal, suggesting possible illness. Geneticist Michael Snyder was wearing seven biosensors collecting data about his health when he noticed changes in his heart rate and oxygen level during a flight.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.01.2017
Metabolic proteins relocate to jump-start an embryo’s genome, UCLA study finds
FINDINGS To turn on its genome — the full set of genes inherited from each parent — a mammalian embryo needs to relocate a group of proteins, researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered. The metabolic proteins, normally found in the energy-generating mitochondria of cells, move to the DNA-containing nuclei about two days after a mouse embryo is fertilized, according to the new study, led by senior author Utpal Banerjee.

Health - 12.01.2017
Twelve new tombs discovered in Gebel el Silsila, Egypt
Twelve new tombs discovered in Gebel el Silsila, Egypt
The Swedish mission at Gebel el Silsila, led by Dr. Maria Nilsson from Lund University and John Ward, has discovered 12 new tombs dating from the 18th Dynasty (Thutmosid period), including crypts cut into the rock, rock-cut tombs with one or two chambers ,niches possibly used for offering, a tomb containing multiple animal burials, and several juvenal burials, some intact.

Health - 12.01.2017
Gastric acid suppressants linked to hospitalisation
We found that taking PPIs increased the risk of hospitalisation with infectious gastroenteritis by up to 70 per cent. New research has found a link between popular heartburn drugs and an increase in the risk of infectious gastroenteritis - an illness that results in 13.1 million lost days of work in Australia a year.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2017
Supporting actors take lead role as our brains age
Supporting actors take lead role as our brains age
The main changes in our brains as we get older are in the brain cells with a supporting role, called glial cells, British scientists have found. The surprising finding in a study by researchers at UCL and the Francis Crick Institute is published in the journal Cell Reports. The researchers also found that the greatest changes in glial cells as we age are in the brain regions most often damaged by neurodegenerative disease, like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

Health - 11.01.2017
Patients with long term conditions overestimate life expectancy
Patients with long term conditions overestimate life expectancy
A review of studies examining perceived life expectancy among people with long term health conditions has found patients may overestimate their life expectancy. A review of studies examining perceived life expectancy among people with long term health conditions has found patients may overestimate their life expectancy.

Health - 11.01.2017
Preschoolers with autism show gains after play-based program
Preschoolers with autism show gains after play-based program
Intervention developed at UCLA proves successful even outside of controlled clinical setting Sarah C.P. Williams Treatments for autism spectrum disorder that appear promising in a research lab often don't work as well in real-life settings. But one intervention, developed over the past 15 years by UCLA scientists, has been shown to be effective in reducing symptoms of autism in preschool-age children, even when it's carried out in facilities with less substantial resources and by mostly young teaching assistants.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2017
A surprise advance in the treatment of adult cancers
Researchers at the RI-MUHC have made a discovery that could improve care for about 15% of patients with head and neck cancer linked to alcohol and tobacco use A team of researchers at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) has found an epigenetic modification that might be the cause of 15% of adult cancers of the throat linked to alcohol and tobacco use.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2017
Slo-mo unwrapping of nucleosomal DNA probes protein’s role
Using X-rays to visualize DNA (dark gray) and fluorescence to monitor the histone proteins (yellow and cyan), Cornell researchers led by professor and director of applied and engineering physics Lois Pollack found that the release of histone proteins is guided by unwrapping DNA. Nucleosomes are tightly packed bunches of DNA and protein which, when linked together as chromatin, form each of the 46 chromosomes found in human cells.

Health - 11.01.2017
IMF lending conditions curb healthcare investment in West Africa, study finds
IMF lending conditions curb healthcare investment in West Africa, study finds
Research shows budget reduction targets and public sector caps, insisted on by the IMF as loan conditions, result in reduced health spending and medical 'brain drain' in developing West African nations.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2017
Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels
Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels
Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels. This is what has been demonstrated by an international team coordinated by researchers from the Gipsa-Lab (CNRS/Grenoble INP/Grenoble Alpes University), the Laboratory of Cognitive Psychology (CNRS/AMU), and the Laboratory of Anatomy at the University of Montpellier, using acoustic analyses of vocalizations coupled with an anatomical study of the tongue muscles and the modeling of the acoustic potential of the vocal tract in monkeys.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.01.2017
High-sugar diet programmes a short lifespan in flies
High-sugar diet programmes a short lifespan in flies
Flies with a history of eating a high sugar diet live shorter lives, even after their diet improves. This is because the unhealthy diet drives long-term reprogramming of gene expression, according to a UCL-led team of researchers. The study, published today in Cell Reports , discovered that the action of a gene called FOXO is inhibited in flies given a high sugar diet in early life, causing long-term effects.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.01.2017
Autism biomarker seen as boon for new treatments
FINDINGS Researchers at the UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment have identified a signature brain-wave pattern for children with autism spectrum disorder related to a genetic condition known as Dup15q syndrome. The research team noted that this signature is among the first quantitative biomarkers identified in electroencephalogram tests discovered for any syndrome highly associated with autism spectrum disorder.

Health - 10.01.2017
New model predicts when people are willing to try new things
New model predicts when people are willing to try new things
A new model to predict when people are most likely to try different products has been developed by scientists at UCL and dunnhumby, a customer science company. The research could help to direct public health interventions aimed at encouraging healthier choices. The team analysed anonymous purchase data from over 280,000 shoppers who regularly bought products in six categories: beers, breads, coffees, toilet papers, washing detergents and yogurts.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.01.2017
Customers who receive genetic health data not alarmed by results, find information useful
ANN ARBOR'As consumers have been able to learn more about their genetic makeup in recent years through personal genomic testing, one big criticism has been that without someone to interpret it, the health information could be harmful to the receivers. Not so, according to a University of Michigan study that shows that less than 2 percent of customers regret receiving such information, and only about 1 percent say they are harmed by the results.
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