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Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2017
Identification of one of the keys allowing entry of Zika virus into brain cells
A team led by Ali Amara, Inserm Research Director at Unit 944, 'Pathology and Molecular Virology' (Inserm/CNRS/Paris Diderot University) describes, in an article published in Cell Reports , the mechanisms that allow Zika virus to infect the cells of the nervous system. The ZIKAlliance project, coordinated by Inserm and funded under the Horizon 2020 programme of the European Commission's Directorate-General for Research and Innovation, is aimed at characterising the fundamental and clinical aspects of infection by Zika virus, an emerging pathogen in America.

Health - 09.01.2017
Progesterone may be key to preventing recurrent miscarriage
For women who suffer multiple pregnancy losses in the first four to six weeks of gestation, the hormone progesterone could offer hope for a successful birth, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers and their colleagues at University of Illinois at Chicago. The results are published in the current issue of Fertility & Sterility, the international journal of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.01.2017
Crohn's disease risk and prognosis determined by different genes, study finds
Crohn’s disease risk and prognosis determined by different genes, study finds
Researchers have identified a series of genetic variants that affect the severity of Crohn's disease, an inflammatory bowel disease - but surprisingly, none of these variants appear to be related to an individual's risk of developing the condition in the first place.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.01.2017
Snails travel far and wide, spreading disease along the way
Snails travel far and wide, spreading disease along the way
Parasite-carrying snails can travel long distances, spreading a deadly disease along the way, according to new research led by UC Berkeley. The study is the first to find genetic evidence for long-distance movements - as far as 30 miles'among snails that pose an important public health threat. Where and how snails move is of concern in many developing countries because freshwater snails transmit schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease that affects more than 240 million people worldwide.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.01.2017
Retroviruses ’almost half a billion years old’
Researchers have found that retroviruses could be half a billion years old - several hundred million years older than previously thought. Retroviruses - the family of viruses that includes HIV - are almost half a billion years old, according to new research by scientists at Oxford University. That's several hundred million years older than previously thought and suggests retroviruses have ancient marine origins, having been with their animal hosts through the evolutionary transition from sea to land.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.01.2017
Brain impairments in premature infants may begin in the womb
Brain impairments in premature infants may begin in the womb
Even before they are born, premature babies may display alterations in the circuitry of their developing brains, according to a first-of-its kind research study by Yale School of Medicine researchers and their colleagues at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Wayne State University. The findings are published in the journal Scientific Reports, a Nature Publishing Group Journal.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.01.2017
Breakthrough in MS treatment
In separate clinical trials, a drug called ocrelizumab has been shown to reduce new attacks in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), and new symptom progression in primary progressive MS. Three studies conducted by an international team of researchers, which included Amit Bar-Or and Douglas Arnold from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University, have discovered that ocrelizumab can significantly reduce new attacks in patients with relapsing MS, as well as slow the progression of symptoms caused by primary progressive MS.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.01.2017
Mediterranean diet may protect your brain in old age, new finding suggests
Mediterranean diet may protect your brain in old age, new finding suggests
Could a Mediterranean diet keep your brain young? That is the tantalising finding from a study out this week. Writing on The Conversation website, Professor Paul Fletcher from the Department of Psychiatry investigates the findings. Amid the contention about diets and detoxes, sugar and fats, there is at least general agreement that a Mediterranean diet - fruit, vegetables, olive oil, grains, fish - is a good thing.

Health - Psychology - 06.01.2017
CDC guidelines for HIV prevention regimen may not go far enough, study suggests
CDC guidelines for HIV prevention regimen may not go far enough, study suggests
A new study from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health suggests modifying federal health guidelines related to the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV transmission because current standards could miss some people who should be on it. Pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is a measure that has proven to be highly effective in preventing HIV transmission during unprotected sex.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.01.2017
Bacteria resists 'last-resort' antibiotic
Bacteria resists ’last-resort’ antibiotic
An international research team, led by the University of Bristol, has provided the first clues to understand how the mcr-1 gene protects bacteria from colistin - a 'last resort' antibiotic used to treat life-threatening bacterial infections that do not respond to other treatment options.

Health - Administration - 06.01.2017
Risk of long-term disability in older adults who visit the ED
Risk of long-term disability in older adults who visit the ED
Older adults who go to the emergency department (ED) for an illness or injury are at increased risk for disability and decline in physical abilities up to six months later, according to a study by Yale researchers. The study was published on Jan. 6, 2017, in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. Most adults aged 65 and older who visit the emergency department each year are treated and sent home.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.01.2017
How ancestry shapes our immune cells
How ancestry shapes our immune cells
A genetic variant that is particularly prevalent in people of African ancestry confers protection against malaria. LMU researchers have now shown how it modulates the properties of white blood cells that play a major role in immune defenses and inflammation. Virtually the entire population of sub-Saharan Africa, and some 70% of African Americans, carry a gene variant (allele) which results in a trait referred to as Duffy-negative.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.01.2017
Bacteria deployed to destroy mosquito-borne dengue can’t take the heat
A promising strain of bacteria that stops dengue transmission in mosquitoes struggles to survive hot conditions, new research from the University of Melbourne has revealed. But there is a silver lining, because researchers now know which particular strains will survive the steamy tropics, where disease-bearing mosquitoes thrive.

Economics / Business - Health - 05.01.2017
Job clubs could help reduce depression in people through unemployment
Job clubs could help reduce depression in people through unemployment
Job clubs could be effective in reducing depression in people experiencing the effects of unemployment, particularly those at high risk of depression, an NIHR-funded study has found. Many people feeling depressed and anxious because of financial hardship do not seek help from their GP.

Health - 05.01.2017
Older lung cancer patients face significant treatment burden
Older lung cancer patients face significant treatment burden
Depending on the type of treatment older lung cancer patients receive, they can spend an average of one in three days interacting with the healthcare system in the first 60 days after surgery or radiation therapy, according to a study by Yale researchers. The findings are published in current issue of Journal of Oncology Practice.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.01.2017
Development of face recognition entails brain tissue growth
Development of face recognition entails brain tissue growth
A central tenet in neuroscience has been that the amount of brain tissue goes in one direction throughout our lives - from too much to just enough. A new study finds that in some cases the brain can add tissue as well. People are born with brains riddled with excess neural connections. Those are slowly pruned back until early childhood when, scientists thought, the brain's structure becomes relatively stable.

Health - 05.01.2017
Lung cancer patients may benefit from delayed chemotherapy after surgery
Lung cancer patients may benefit from delayed chemotherapy after surgery
A new Yale study suggests that patients with a common form of lung cancer may still benefit from delayed chemotherapy started up to four months after surgery, according to the researchers. The study was published online by JAMA Oncology on Jan. Each year, more people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.01.2017
‘Molecular volume control’ may help combat tumours
A 'molecular volume control' may one day be used to manipulate enzyme activity in order control the development and treatment of cancer, according to research at the Universities of Dundee and Bath. The researchers have uncovered new functions of an enzyme called Dual-specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5), which will help scientists to better understand how tumours develop.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.01.2017
Genetics play a significant role in immunity
Nearly three quarters of immune traits are influenced by genes, new research from King's reveals. The study published today , adds to a growing body of evidence that the genetic influence on our immune system is significantly higher than previously thought. Researchers from King's, supported by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and St Thomas' Foundation Trust and King's College London, analysed 23,000 immune traits in 497 adult female twins from the TwinsUK cohort.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.01.2017
New technique uses immune cells to deliver anti-cancer drugs
Artist's conception of nanoparticle-carrying immune cells that target tumors and release drug-loaded nanoparticles for cancer treatment. UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa - Some researchers are working to discover new, safer ways to deliver cancer-fighting drugs to tumors without damaging healthy cells. Others are finding ways to boost the body's own immune system to attack cancer cells.
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