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Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 18.01.2017
ANU helps identify new species of ‘Skywalker’ gibbon
An Australian National University (ANU) researcher has helped identify a new species of primate which has been named the 'Skywalker Hoolock gibbon' - partly because the scientists that made the discovery are Star Wars fans. Renowned biological anthropologist Emeritus Professor Colin Groves of the ANU School of Archaeology and Anthropology has been working in the field of species classification for more than 50 years.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2017
’5-D protein fingerprinting’ could give insights into Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s
ANN ARBOR'In research that could one day lead to advances against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, University of Michigan engineering researchers have demonstrated a technique for precisely measuring the properties of individual protein molecules floating in a liquid. Proteins are essential to the function of every cell.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2017
Smartphone microscope offers cost-effective DNA sequencing and genetic mutation analysis
Smartphone microscope offers cost-effective DNA sequencing and genetic mutation analysis
Device developed by UCLA and Swedish scientists would make genetic tests available in remote areas Meghan Steele Horan Just like an alphabet is made up of individual letters, DNA is composed of chemical bases. And in the same way that letters must be placed in a specific order to form words and sentences, the sequence of chemical bases is incredibly important in how DNA functions and codes our lives.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.01.2017
The first archive of iPS cells from Parkinson's patients
The first archive of iPS cells from Parkinson’s patients
The Stem Cell Laboratory for CNS Disease Modeling (CSC Laboratory) in Lund, has created one of the largest iPSC biobanks from patients diagnosed with familial and idiopathic PD, and associated synucleionopathies. iPSCs are obtained by reprogramming patient's somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2017
Calorie restriction lets monkeys live long and prosper
For News Media Hold for 10 a.m. Central Time release Jan. A 2009 image of rhesus monkeys in a landmark study of the benefits of caloric restriction. The 27-year-old monkey on the left was given a diet with fewer calories while the 29-year-old monkey on the right was allowed to eat as much as it liked.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 17.01.2017
When it comes to mating, fruit flies can make rational choices
When it comes to mating, fruit flies can make rational choices
Humans make rational choices - though perhaps not all the time. But does the ability for rational decision-making extend to other members of the animal kingdom? If so, how far are they from the human lineage? The answer, according to researchers from the University of Washington, is pretty far. In a paper published Jan.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2017
Microbiota: new insights on what happens to dietary fibre in the human gut
Microbiota: new insights on what happens to dietary fibre in the human gut
One of the major functions of our intestinal microbiota - which until recently was thought to reside only in the colon - is to break down dietary fibre (and namely complex polysaccharides). However, researchers from INRA working with CNRS 1 used metagenomic screening to reveal fibrolytic potential in the ileum section of the small intestine.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.01.2017
Patients recovering from depression show improvements in memory from the drug modafinil
Patients recovering from depression show improvements in memory from the drug modafinil
Modafinil, a drug used to treat narcolepsy - excessive daytime sleepiness - can improve memory in patients recovering from depression, according to new research from the University of Cambridge. The findings, published today in the journal Biological Psychiatry: CNNI, result from a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and offer hope of a treatment for some of the cognitive symptoms of depression.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.01.2017
A natural compound can block the formation of toxins associated with Parkinson's Disease
A natural compound can block the formation of toxins associated with Parkinson’s Disease
Squalamine, a natural product studied for its anticancer and anti-infective properties, could also lead to future treatments for Parkinson's Disease. To our surprise, we found evidence that squalamine not only slows down the formation of the toxins associated with Parkinson's Disease, but also makes them less toxic altogether.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 16.01.2017
Take the mRNA train
Take the mRNA train
Messenger RNAs bearing the genetic information for the synthesis of proteins are delivered to defined sites in the cell cytoplasm by molecular motors. LMU researchers have elucidated how the motors recognize their mRNA freight. Messenger RNAs carry the information for the assembly of proteins from the DNA in the cell nucleus to the sites of protein synthesis in the cytoplasm, and are crucial for cell function.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.01.2017
Using microfluidics to improve genetics research
Using microfluidics to improve genetics research
Scientists at EPFL have developed a technique that can be a game-changer for genetics by making the characterization of DNA-binding proteins much faster, more accurate, and efficient. Genes hold the DNA code for producing all the proteins of the cell. To begin this process, genes require a huge family of DNA-binding proteins called transcription factors, which are of enormous interest to biologists today.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.01.2017
Ebola survivors: life afterwards
The long-term clinical and social sequelae following survival of Ebola infection are unknown.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.01.2017
New understanding of AIDS-related dementia
Researchers from Cardiff University and the University of California (UCLA) have made a breakthrough in the understanding of AIDS-related dementia, discovering the role of a neuron protein which was also found to affect learning abilities in healthy subjects. Professor Kevin Fox who led the work at Cardiff University's School of Biosciences said: "Our work represents a major change in the understanding of how AIDS-related dementia works..." The new research started out as a random behavioural screen of mice at UCLA, revealing some mutant mice had better memory than others.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.01.2017
Older mothers more likely to face birth complications
Pregnant women over 35 years old are more likely to have complications at birth due to delayed and longer labour stages, according to new research from King's College London. It is well known that older mothers are more likely to experience complicated births. In a new study published today in The Journal of Physiology, researchers have identified physiological changes in the body that could explain this.

Environment - Life Sciences - 12.01.2017
Fish lightly to keep Snapper on the reef
Fish lightly to keep Snapper on the reef
Fishing is fundamentally altering the food chain in coral reefs and putting extra pressure on top-level predator fish, according to new research. Fish such as Snapper and Grouper sit at the top of the food chain and are highly sought-after in restaurants the world over, commanding a high price in fish markets and supporting the livelihoods of many fishing communities across the Tropics - but the coral reefs they inhabit are under threat.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.01.2017
Wearable sensors can tell when you are getting sick
New research from Stanford shows that fitness monitors and other wearable biosensors can tell when an individual's heart rate, skin temperature and other measures are abnormal, suggesting possible illness. Geneticist Michael Snyder was wearing seven biosensors collecting data about his health when he noticed changes in his heart rate and oxygen level during a flight.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.01.2017
Metabolic proteins relocate to jump-start an embryo’s genome, UCLA study finds
FINDINGS To turn on its genome — the full set of genes inherited from each parent — a mammalian embryo needs to relocate a group of proteins, researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered. The metabolic proteins, normally found in the energy-generating mitochondria of cells, move to the DNA-containing nuclei about two days after a mouse embryo is fertilized, according to the new study, led by senior author Utpal Banerjee.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 12.01.2017
Putting chromosomes through the shredder
Putting chromosomes through the shredder
When a certain human enzyme is left uncontrolled, it breaks up chromosomes into tiny pieces. This is damaging to cells, but useful for killing tumours. ETH researchers have now come to understand the underlying mechanism. Our cells contain the enzyme MUS81; this is called on in emergencies, for example, when cells are unable to replicate because the DNA-replication machinery gets tangled up in strands of DNA.

Environment - Life Sciences - 12.01.2017
Climate change could kill off parasites, destabilizing ecosystems
Climate change could kill off parasites, destabilizing ecosystems
Photogenic animals, from polar bears to people, aren't the only creatures under threat from global climate change. A new review led by UC Berkeley suggests the phenomenon threatens parasites with extinction, which could have big consequences for ecosystems. The vast majority of research into parasites and environment change focuses on how hosts, particularly humans, will be harmed.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2017
Supporting actors take lead role as our brains age
Supporting actors take lead role as our brains age
The main changes in our brains as we get older are in the brain cells with a supporting role, called glial cells, British scientists have found. The surprising finding in a study by researchers at UCL and the Francis Crick Institute is published in the journal Cell Reports. The researchers also found that the greatest changes in glial cells as we age are in the brain regions most often damaged by neurodegenerative disease, like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.
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