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Life Sciences - Health - 06.01.2017
Mediterranean diet may protect your brain in old age, new finding suggests
Mediterranean diet may protect your brain in old age, new finding suggests
Could a Mediterranean diet keep your brain young? That is the tantalising finding from a study out this week. Writing on The Conversation website, Professor Paul Fletcher from the Department of Psychiatry investigates the findings. Amid the contention about diets and detoxes, sugar and fats, there is at least general agreement that a Mediterranean diet - fruit, vegetables, olive oil, grains, fish - is a good thing.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.01.2017
Bacteria resists 'last-resort' antibiotic
Bacteria resists ’last-resort’ antibiotic
An international research team, led by the University of Bristol, has provided the first clues to understand how the mcr-1 gene protects bacteria from colistin - a 'last resort' antibiotic used to treat life-threatening bacterial infections that do not respond to other treatment options.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.01.2017
How ancestry shapes our immune cells
How ancestry shapes our immune cells
A genetic variant that is particularly prevalent in people of African ancestry confers protection against malaria. LMU researchers have now shown how it modulates the properties of white blood cells that play a major role in immune defenses and inflammation. Virtually the entire population of sub-Saharan Africa, and some 70% of African Americans, carry a gene variant (allele) which results in a trait referred to as Duffy-negative.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.01.2017
Bacteria deployed to destroy mosquito-borne dengue can’t take the heat
A promising strain of bacteria that stops dengue transmission in mosquitoes struggles to survive hot conditions, new research from the University of Melbourne has revealed. But there is a silver lining, because researchers now know which particular strains will survive the steamy tropics, where disease-bearing mosquitoes thrive.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.01.2017
Development of face recognition entails brain tissue growth
Development of face recognition entails brain tissue growth
A central tenet in neuroscience has been that the amount of brain tissue goes in one direction throughout our lives - from too much to just enough. A new study finds that in some cases the brain can add tissue as well. People are born with brains riddled with excess neural connections. Those are slowly pruned back until early childhood when, scientists thought, the brain's structure becomes relatively stable.

Life Sciences - 05.01.2017
From Sight to Recognition: Researchers Map How the Brain Processes Faces
By Shilo Rea Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are getting closer to understanding how your brain perceives faces and recognizes old friends you haven't seen in years. In a study published in the Dec. 26, 2016, issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), scientists used highly sophisticated brain imaging tools and computational methods to measure the real-time brain processes that convert the appearance of a face into the recognition of an individual.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.01.2017
‘Molecular volume control’ may help combat tumours
A 'molecular volume control' may one day be used to manipulate enzyme activity in order control the development and treatment of cancer, according to research at the Universities of Dundee and Bath. The researchers have uncovered new functions of an enzyme called Dual-specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5), which will help scientists to better understand how tumours develop.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.01.2017
Genetics play a significant role in immunity
Nearly three quarters of immune traits are influenced by genes, new research from King's reveals. The study published today , adds to a growing body of evidence that the genetic influence on our immune system is significantly higher than previously thought. Researchers from King's, supported by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and St Thomas' Foundation Trust and King's College London, analysed 23,000 immune traits in 497 adult female twins from the TwinsUK cohort.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.01.2017
New technique uses immune cells to deliver anti-cancer drugs
Artist's conception of nanoparticle-carrying immune cells that target tumors and release drug-loaded nanoparticles for cancer treatment. UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa - Some researchers are working to discover new, safer ways to deliver cancer-fighting drugs to tumors without damaging healthy cells. Others are finding ways to boost the body's own immune system to attack cancer cells.

Art and Design - Life Sciences - 04.01.2017
Lack of joy from music linked to brain disconnection
Using fMRI data, researchers found that while listening to music, specific musical anhedonics presented a reduction in the activity of the Nucleus Accumbens Have you ever met someone who just wasn't into music' They may have a condition called specific musical anhedonia, which affects three-to-five per cent of the population.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.01.2017
Tailoring individual therapies for Multiple Sclerosis
Tailoring individual therapies for Multiple Sclerosis
Research news A large global new partnership called 'MultipleMS', coordinated by Karolinska Institute in Sweden, has been awarded 15 million euro from the European Commission in the Horizon2020 program to find novel and better treatments for Multiple Sclerosis (MS). In this project, 21 universities and companies from Europe and the USA will unite efforts to tailor the development and application of therapies to the individual MS patient.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.01.2017
From photosynthesis to new compounds for eye diseases
From photosynthesis to new compounds for eye diseases
Researchers have succeeded in using X-rays to minutely observe a photosynthesis reaction and produce a movie of the event. The findings will aid understanding of similar processes in the human eye. Plants and algae are not alone in undergoing photosynthesis. Some bacteria also use energy from sunlight to grow and reproduce.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.01.2017
Researchers contribute to six of 10 discoveries of year picked by Quebec Science
Québec Science magazine has selected its 10 Discoveries of the Year for 2016, and McGill researchers figure in six of them. The annual list highlights top scientific research from across Quebec. Two of the discoveries were led by researchers at McGill: Québec Science magazine has selected its 10 Discoveries of the Year for 2016, and McGill researchers figure in six of them.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.01.2017
Stocking up on spare parts
Stocking up on spare parts
LMU researchers show, for the first time, that the orientation of the plane of division of neural stem cells at a specific stage during embryonic development determines the capacity of the adult brain to replace nerve cells. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's, but also strokes or other types of traumatic brain damage, result in the death of nerve cells in the brain.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 03.01.2017
When cells play dice
When cells play dice
Single-Cell-Based Analysis Highlights a Surge in Cell-to-Cell Molecular Variability Preceding Irreversible Commitment in a Differentiation Process Abstract In some recent studies, a view emerged that stochastic dynamics governing the switching of cells from one differentiation state to another could be characterized by a peak in gene expression variability at the point of fate commitment.
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