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Physics - 07.11.2017
Scientists see fireworks from atoms at ultra-low temperatures
Jets of atoms shoot off together like fireworks from a central disc in a new quantum phenomenon discovered by UChicago scientists (color added for illustration). Scientists aren't normally treated to fireworks when they discover something about the universe. But a team of University of Chicago researchers found a show waiting for them at the atomic level-along with a new form of quantum behavior.

Physics - Life Sciences - 06.11.2017
Nano-CT device successfully tested
Nano-CT device successfully tested
Research news Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers.

Physics - Electroengineering - 06.11.2017
'Smart' paper can conduct electricity, detect water
’Smart’ paper can conduct electricity, detect water
In cities and large-scale manufacturing plants, a water leak in a complicated network of pipes can take tremendous time and effort to detect, as technicians must disassemble many pieces to locate the problem. The American Water Works Association indicates that nearly a quarter-million water line breaks occur each year in the U.S., costing public water utilities about $2.8 billion annually.

Physics - 06.11.2017
First-ever U.S. experiments at new x-ray facility may lead to better explosive modeling
First-ever U.S. experiments at new x-ray facility may lead to better explosive modeling
Small-angle x-ray scattering is used to observe ultra-fast carbon clustering and graphite and nanodiamond production in the insensitive explosive Plastic Bonded Explosive 9502. "The carbon particle size, shape, composition and their evolution in time helps us understand how explosives deliver energy over a given time frame." - Dana Dattelbaum, of Explosive Science and Shock Physics Division Los Alamos, New Mexico, Nov.

Physics - 06.11.2017
The University of Birmingham embarks on a crowdfunding campaign to secure a new cycle scheme
Scientists have designed gold nanoparticles, no bigger than 100 nanometres, which can be coated and used to track blood flow in the smallest blood vessels in the body. By improving our understanding of blood flow in vivo the nanoprobes represent an opportunity to help in the early diagnosis of disease.

Physics - 06.11.2017
Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer
Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer
The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories.

Life Sciences - Physics - 03.11.2017
Scientists identify mechanism that helps us inhibit unwanted thoughts
Scientists identify mechanism that helps us inhibit unwanted thoughts
Scientists have identified a key chemical within the 'memory' region of the brain that allows us to suppress unwanted thoughts, helping explain why people who suffer from disorders such as anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and schizophrenia often experience persistent intrusive thoughts when these circuits go awry.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 01.11.2017
New Research Could Predict La Niña Drought Years in Advance
New Research Could Predict La Niña Drought Years in Advance
The La Nia weather pattern can cause droughts in the southern United States, including parts of eastern Texas. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Two new studies from The University of Texas at Austin have significantly improved scientists' ability to predict the strength and duration of droughts caused by La Nia - a recurrent cooling pattern in the tropical Pacific Ocean.

Chemistry - Physics - 30.10.2017
New Studies on Disordered Cathodes May Provide Much-Needed Jolt to Lithium Batteries
New Studies on Disordered Cathodes May Provide Much-Needed Jolt to Lithium Batteries
Today's lithium-ion battery was invented so long ago, there are not many more efficiencies to wring out of it. Now researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) report major progress in cathodes made with so-called "disordered" materials, a promising new type of lithium battery.

Physics - 27.10.2017
Nanomagnets Levitate Thanks to Quantum Physics
Nanomagnets Levitate Thanks to Quantum Physics
Quantum physicists in Oriol Romero-Isart's research group in Innsbruck show in two current publications that, despite Earnshaw's theorem, nanomagnets can be stably levitated in an external static magnetic field owing to quantum mechanical principles. The quantum angular momentum of electrons, which also causes magnetism, is accountable for this mechanism.

Physics - Life Sciences - 26.10.2017
How much does life weigh?
How much does life weigh?
ETH researchers have developed a scale for measuring cells. It allows the weight of individual living cells, and any changes in this weight, to be determined quickly and accurately for the first time. The invention has also aroused significant interest both in and outside the field of biology. From earthworms and sunflowers to human beings, we are all made up of cells, so it's no surprise that researchers are hard at work investigating these building blocks of life.

Physics - 25.10.2017
New property found in unusual crystalline materials
New property found in unusual crystalline materials
Most metals and semiconductors, from the steel in a knife blade to the silicon in a solar panel, are made up of many tiny crystalline grains. The way these grains meet at their edges can have a major impact on the solid's properties, including mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, thermal properties, flexibility, and so on.

Physics - Computer Science - 24.10.2017
Quantum computing breakthrough: Imperial scientist reveals latest findings
Quantum computing breakthrough: Imperial scientist reveals latest findings
A materials expert says quantum computers may be able to come out of the cold, thanks to his research breakthrough. Dr Jonathan Breeze is from the Department of Materials at Imperial College London. He says his research breakthrough may help scientists overcome a major obstacle with quantum computers - the fact that they have to operate in conditions that are colder than deep space.

Physics - Chemistry - 24.10.2017
Jumping Nanoparticles
Jumping Nanoparticles
Transitions occurring in nanoscale systems, such as a chemical reaction or the folding of a protein, are strongly affected by friction and thermal noise. Almost 80 years ago, the Dutch physicist Hendrik Kramers predicted that such transitions occur most frequently at intermediate friction, an effect known as Kramers turnover.

Physics - Life Sciences - 18.10.2017
Petals produce a 'blue halo' to help bees find flowers
Petals produce a ’blue halo’ to help bees find flowers
New study finds "messy" microscopic structures on petals of some flowers manipulate light to produce a blue colour effect that is easily seen by bee pollinators. Researchers say these petal grooves evolved independently multiple times across flowering plants, but produce the same result: a floral halo of blue-to-ultraviolet light.

Physics - Life Sciences - 18.10.2017
Petals produce a 'blue halo' that helps bees find flowers
Petals produce a ’blue halo’ that helps bees find flowers
New study finds "messy" microscopic structures on petals of some flowers manipulate light to produce a blue colour effect that is easily seen by bee pollinators. Researchers say these petal grooves evolved independently multiple times across flowering plants, but produce the same result: a floral halo of blue-to-ultraviolet light.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.10.2017
Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings
Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings
It confirms Einstein's prediction that gravitational waves travel at the same speed as gamma rays: the speed of light. "As soon as I heard the news, I knew that understanding all of the implications would require input from a broad, multi-disciplinary set of scientists." - Chris Fryer Gravitational-wave observation confirms heavy-elements theory LOS ALAMOS, N.M. Oct.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.10.2017
Gravitational waves world-first discovery Down Under
A Sydney team was the first in the world to confirm radiowaves from the latest gravitational waves event, resulting from a spectacular neutron star merger that has produced light and radio waves as well as gravitational waves. An Australian group was the first in the world to confirm the radio emission from a gravitational wave event, discovered by collaborators in the United States being announced today.

Physics - Electroengineering - 16.10.2017
Nanoantenna arrays power a new generation of fluorescence-based sensors
Nanoantenna arrays power a new generation of fluorescence-based sensors
Researchers from the Universities of Bristol and Bedfordshire, in collaboration with multinational company ABB, have designed and tested a series of plasmonic nanoantenna arrays that could lead to the development of a new generation of ultrasensitive and low-cost fluorescence sensors that could be used to monitor water quality.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 16.10.2017
Integral sees blast travelling with gravitational waves
Integral sees blast travelling with gravitational waves
ESA's Integral satellite recently played a crucial role in discovering the flash of gamma rays linked to the gravitational waves released by the collision of two neutron stars. On 17 August, a burst of gamma rays lit up in space for almost two seconds. It was promptly recorded by Integral and NASA's Fermi satellite.