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Environment - 17.12.2018
Drones can detect protected nightjar nests
Thermal-sensing cameras mounted on drones may offer a safer and more cost-effective way to locate nests of the elusive European nightjar in forestry work and construction areas, finds new research by Cardiff University. The team from the University's School of Biosciences conducted a pilot study in Bryn, a Natural Resources Wales conifer plantation in South Wales, to test the suitability of drones to detect nest sites of the protected bird.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.12.2018
How liquid droplets grow in cells
How liquid droplets grow in cells
For more than 100 years, biologists have known that cells contain various kinds of membraneless organelles and conjectured what organizing principles underlie them. During the past decade, liquid-liquid phase separation has emerged as one of the concepts that can explain these cellular structures. Phase separation has become an increasingly hot topic, as it can be related to pathologies such as neurodegenerative diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
Clues to chronic fatigue syndrome in overactive immune response
New research from King's College London finds that an exaggerated immune response can trigger long-lasting fatigue, potentially explaining how chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) begins. The study is the most in-depth biological investigation yet into the role of the immune system in lasting symptoms of fatigue.

Innovation - Materials Science - 17.12.2018
Top-notch research is the basis for a successful technology transfer
Top-notch research is the basis for a successful technology transfer
In such a highly competitive environment as scientific research, it is a good idea to ask yourself on a regular basis just how well you fare by international comparison. With this in mind, Empa conducted a peer review last October: eleven international experts from all of Empa's areas of activity scrutinized the institute's output in research and innovation and compared it with the rest of the world.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.12.2018
A diet rich in cheese in early childhood may protect against allergies
A diet rich in cheese in early childhood may protect against allergies
A study conducted by the University Hospital of Besanšon and INRA shows the protective effect of high cheese consumption from a very young age. For the first time, a link has been established between cheese consumption and the probability of developing food or skin allergic diseases, regardless of the consumption of various other foods (vegetables or fruits, cereals, bread, meat, cake and yogurt) and living conditions in a farm environment (presence and diversity of farm animals).

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.12.2018
A diet rich in cheese in early childhood could protect against allergies
A diet rich in cheese in early childhood could protect against allergies
A study conducted by the University Hospital of Besanšon and INRA shows the protective effect of high cheese consumption from a very young age. For the first time, a link has been established between cheese consumption and the probability of developing food or skin allergic diseases, regardless of the consumption of various other foods (vegetables or fruits, cereals, bread, meat, cake and yogurt) and living conditions in a farm environment (presence and diversity of farm animals).

Physics - 17.12.2018
Data storage using individual molecules
Data storage using individual molecules
Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal small, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.12.2018
Could cancer anti-sickness drug end the misery for IBS patients?
Could a commonly-prescribed anti-sickness drug be the answer for the 1.3 million people in the UK who suffer the pain and misery of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea (IBS-D)? A nationwide clinical trial led by researchers at The University of Nottingham and funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) will assess the medication ondansetron, which is currently used by doctors to help cancer patients cope with the nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
The importance of ’edge populations’ to biodiversity
More than two-thirds of Canada's biodiversity is made up of species that occur within the country's borders only at the very northern edge of their range. Biologists have long debated how much effort should be dedicated to conserving these "edge populations." One argument in their favour is that they may be especially well suited to lead northward range shifts for their species as the climate warms.

Health - Innovation - 17.12.2018
Wound care revolution: Put away your rulers and reach for your phone
Monitoring a wound is critical, especially in diabetic patients, whose lack of sensation due to nerve damage can lead to infection of a lesion and, ultimately, amputation. Clinicians and healthcare professionals at the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) and other hospitals believe that the use of a new app, Swift Skin and Wound(TM), which accurately measures and charts the progression of skin wounds, could potentially have a significant impact on clinical management and patient outcomes.

Materials Science - Environment - 15.12.2018
The wood magician
The new head of Empa's Cellulose & Wood Materials lab, Gustav Nystr÷m, has taken everyone by surprise by setting unconventional goals. However, paper batteries and nanocellulose sensors have one main objective: to help solve fundamental, socially relevant questions. When Gustav Nystr÷m sees a tree, he sees more than just a biological marvel.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2018
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Schistosomiasis is a parasitic worm infection affecting 250 million people globally. The current prevalence thresholds for preventive chemotherapy of intestinal schistosomiasis are based on the Kato-Katz method using stool samples. A new more sensitive point-of-care urine test is now available in particular for settings with low prevalence.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2018
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Schistosomiasis is a parasitic worm infection affecting 250 million people globally. The current prevalence thresholds for preventive chemotherapy of intestinal schistosomiasis are based on the Kato-Katz method using stool samples. A new more sensitive point-of-care urine test is now available in particular for settings with low prevalence.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.12.2018
Newly identified enzyme could play key role in childbirth, muscle diseases
Scientists at Stanford have solved a 50-year-old mystery that could open up new areas of research into muscle disorders. The study revealed a human enzyme that modifies muscle proteins to help them grow and remain strong. Facebook Twitter Email Since the 1960s, scientists have known of a modification that occurs to a particular molecule in muscles, especially after exercise.

Computer Science - Economics / Business - 14.12.2018
Cryptocurrency manipulation schemes could be found and foiled by new algorithm
Imperial scientists have created an algorithm to predict when specific cryptocoins are at risk of 'pump-and-dump' schemes. The algorithm could help market regulators predict and prevent cryptocurrency schemes that sees traders spend seven million US Dollars per month, only to find the price of their purchased currency falls as the scheme unfolds.

Health - Social Sciences - 14.12.2018
Pension plan improving mental health in China
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Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2018
Two generations of alumni celebrate at degree congregation
New recommendations, led by experts at the University of Birmingham, have been published to improve the use of liver blood tests. The recommendations, published in Gut, are aimed at helping healthcare workers diagnose patients with liver disease as well as preventing unnecessary repeat tests for people unlikely to have significant liver disease.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2018
Artificial intelligence-based device detects moving parasites in bodily fluid for easier, earlier diagnosis
Artificial intelligence-based device detects moving parasites in bodily fluid for easier, earlier diagnosis
Science + Technology Developed by UCLA Engineering researchers, system is 'like a motion detector for the microscopic world' Amy Akmal Scientists typically diagnose parasitic infections by scanning bodily fluid samples with optical microscopes. But that conventional approach sometimes doesn't work — for example, if the concentration of parasites in the sample is too low, or if the microscope's imaging capabilities lack the sensitivity to detect disease early on.

Astronomy / Space Science - 14.12.2018
Young star caught forming around another star
A small star has been observed forming out of the dust surrounding a larger star, in a similar way to how planets are born. Astronomers were observing the formation of a massive young star, called MM 1a, when they discovered an unexpected object nearby. MM 1a is surrounded by rotating disc of gas and dust.

Psychology - 14.12.2018
University of Birmingham recognised in UK’s ’best breakthroughs’ list
An experimental study has suggested that alcohol consumption contributes to self-blame in rape, and women who blame themselves may not be as likely to report it. Following a hypothetical interactive rape scenario, participants who believed that they had consumed alcohol rather than a non-alcoholic beverage were more likely to self-blame, and those participants who reported higher levels of self-blame indicated that they would be less willing to report the hypothetical rape to the police.