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History / Archeology - 13.12.2018
Satellite data expose looting
Satellite data expose looting
Globally archaeological heritage is under threat by looting. The destruction of archaeological sites obliterates the basis for our understanding of ancient cultures and we lose our shared human past. Research at University of Bern shows that satellite data provide a mean to monitor the destruction of archaeological sites.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 13.12.2018
A space playground for the fourth state of matter
A space playground for the fourth state of matter
ESA Human Spaceflight Astronauts International Space Station Research Exploration ESA > Our Activities > Human Spaceflight > International Space Station 13 December 2018 A recipe to understand atomic structures: Mix electrically-charged gas in a sealed container with particles so small they would pass through a coffee filter.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.12.2018
Faecal transplants, 'robotic guts' and the fight against deadly gut bugs
Faecal transplants, ’robotic guts’ and the fight against deadly gut bugs
A simple compound found in our gut could help to stop dangerous bacteria behind severe, and sometimes fatal, hospital infections. Dr Ben Mullish understands more than most about the seriousness of gut bugs. Although many people will appear to have no more than an upset stomach for a couple of days, infections of the gut and intestines can prove deadly to vulnerable patients, such as the elderly or those undergoing cancer therapy.

Health - Pharmacology - 13.12.2018
Ingestible capsule can be controlled wirelessly
Ingestible capsule can be controlled wirelessly
Electronic pill can relay diagnostic information or release drugs in response to smartphone commands. Researchers at MIT, Draper, and Brigham and Women's Hospital have designed an ingestible capsule that can be controlled using Bluetooth wireless technology. The capsule, which can be customized to deliver drugs, sense environmental conditions, or both, can reside in the stomach for at least a month, transmitting information and responding to instructions from a user's smartphone.

Physics - Health - 13.12.2018
Study confirms rise in megaesophagus cases in dogs was linked to pet food
A new report has found that the increase in megaesophagus cases in Australia in 2017 and 2018 can be linked to Advance Dermocare(TM) pet food. Megaesophagus is an enlargement of the oesophagus (the muscular tube connecting the throat to the stomach) that limits the movement of food and liquid down to the stomach.

Career - 13.12.2018
NHS vital lifeline for the Welsh regional economy
The NHS in Wales supports more than 10% of the country's total employment, new research has shown. The study, carried out at Cardiff Business School's Welsh Economy Research Unit, details what the organisation generates in terms of jobs and wages - both directly to its employees as well as to services and companies that supply and maintain NHS activity in Wales.

Law - 12.12.2018
Reduction in the legal blood alcohol limit has had no impact on number of road traffic accidents
The lowering of the legal blood alcohol limit for drivers in Scotland has had no impact on the number of road traffic accidents, a new study has found. The research, led by the University of Glasgow and published in The Lancet, evaluated the impact of the change in legislation which occurred in Scotland in December 2014, when the blood alcohol concentration limit for drivers was reduced from 80 mg/dL to 50 mg/dL.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 12.12.2018
Watching brain cells fire in real time
Watching brain cells fire in real time
Brain scientists have plenty of ways to track the activity of individual neurons in the brain, but they're all invasive. Now, Stanford researchers have found a way to literally watch neurons fire - no electrodes or chemical modifications required. Facebook Twitter Email Scientists have plenty of ways to watch as individual neurons in a brain fire, sending electrical signals from one to the next, but they all share a basic problem.

Physics - 12.12.2018
Networking goes quantum
Networking goes quantum
A scientist involved in expanding quantum communication to a network of users, is continuing his work at the University of Bristol. The enhanced cyber security offered by quantum communication has been historically limited to two partner exchanges, now for the first-time scientists have connected multiple users simultaneously on a quantum encrypted network without using trusted nodes.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.12.2018
15 percent of babies exposed to Zika before birth had severe abnormalities in first 18 months of life
15 percent of babies exposed to Zika before birth had severe abnormalities in first 18 months of life
FINDINGS Researchers evaluated motor skills and cognitive development, visual and hearing function, and brain images of children who had been exposed to the Zika virus during their mothers' pregnancies. By the age of 12 to 18 months, significant problems were present in seven of the 112 children (6.25 percent) who were evaluated for eye abnormalities, in six of the 49 children (12.2 percent) evaluated for hearing problems, and in 11 of the 94 children (11.7 percent) evaluated for severe delays in language, motor skills and/or cognitive function who also had brain imaging.

Astronomy / Space Science - 12.12.2018
Unprecedented Views of the Birth of Planets
Unprecedented Views of the Birth of Planets
Hitherto unknown structures in belts of dust and gas around young stars are providing new insights into the birth of planets along with compelling fodder for research. They were discovered by an international team of astronomers that studied 20 of these so-called protoplanetary discs in a months-long observing campaign.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2018
Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find
Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find
When Seattle Public Schools announced that it would reorganize school start times across the district for the fall of 2016, the massive undertaking took more than a year to deploy. Elementary schools started earlier, while most middle and all of the district's 18 high schools shifted their opening bell almost an hour later - from 7:50 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. Parents had mixed reactions.

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.12.2018
Why deep oceans gave life to the first big, complex organisms
Why deep oceans gave life to the first big, complex organisms
Why did the first big, complex organisms spring to life in deep, dark oceans where food was scarce? A new study finds great depths provided a stable, life-sustaining refuge from wild temperature swings in the shallows. Facebook Twitter Email In the beginning, life was small. For billions of years, all life on Earth was microscopic, consisting mostly of single cells.

Environment - Life Sciences - 12.12.2018
It’s in the genes - potential hope for pikas hit by climate change
As climate change drives mountain-dwelling pikas to higher altitudes, the animals can dial certain genes up or down to make the most of their cooler home's limited oxygen. Facebook Twitter Email As the climate changes, animals that can only survive in certain temperature ranges are being forced to relocate or perish.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.12.2018
Researchers use zinc to target insulin-producing cells with regenerative drug
To treat diabetes directly, rather than manage its symptoms, doctors need a way to get drugs to cells that produce insulin. The key, Stanford researchers report, may be those cells' affinity for zinc. An insulin injection can manage diabetes symptoms, but actually curing the disease would mean healing cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, a hormone that regulates the amount of sugar in blood.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 12.12.2018
Rosetta witnesses birth of baby bow shock around comet
Rosetta witnesses birth of baby bow shock around comet
ESA ESA Science Rosetta A new study reveals that, contrary to first impressions, Rosetta did detect signs of an infant bow shock at the comet it explored for two years - the first ever seen forming anywhere in the Solar System. From 2014 to 2016, ESA's Rosetta spacecraft studied Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and its surroundings from near and far.

Life Sciences - 12.12.2018
Belgian researchers present new beer bible
Belgian Beer: Tested and Tasted is not like other beer books. It's the result of 5 years of hard scientific work. The authors, Professor Kevin Verstrepen and researcher Miguel Roncoroni, analysed as many as 250 beers in their lab at the Leuven Institute for Beer Research and the VIB Centre for Microbiology.  "As scientists, we were frustrated with the fact that we had so little objective data to rely on," Professor Verstrepen explains his motivation.

Microtechnics - 12.12.2018
New foldable drone flies through narrow holes in rescue missions
New foldable drone flies through narrow holes in rescue missions
A research team from the University of Zurich and EPFL have developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters. Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them.

Psychology - 12.12.2018
How bullying affects the brain
New research from King's College London identifies a possible mechanism that shows how bullying may influence the structure of the adolescent brain, suggesting the effects of constantly being bullied are more than just psychological. The study, published in Molecular Psychiatry , shows that there may be physical structural differences in the brains of adolescents who are regularly victimized, and this could increase the chance that they suffer from mental illness.

Social Sciences - Health - 12.12.2018
University of Birmingham awards honorary degrees
Community screening for osteoporosis could prevent more than a quarter of hip fractures in older women, according to new research. A new study, published in The Lancet , has shown that a simple questionnaire, combined with bone mineral density measurements for some, would help identify those at risk of hip fracture.
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