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Results 21 - 40 of 4003.


Life Sciences - Environment - 21.12.2018
Forget-me-not: Scientists pinpoint memory mechanism in plants
Plant scientists at the Universities of Birmingham and Nottingham have unravelled a mechanism that enables flowering plants to sense and ‘remember' changes in their environment. The research, published , reveals potential new targets that could support the development of new plant varieties, including cereals and vegetables, that can adapt to different environmental conditions.

Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 21.12.2018
Earliest records of three plant groups uncovered in the Permian of Jordan
Earliest records of three plant groups uncovered in the Permian of Jordan
A “hidden cradle of plant evolution” has been uncovered in Jordan. In Permian sedimentary rocks exposed along the east coast of the Dead Sea, palaeobotanists discovered well-preserved fossils of plant groups bearing characteristics typical of younger periods of Earth history. The Permian began some 300 million years ago and ended around 250 million years ago.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.12.2018
£1000: the cost of delivering a Type 2 diabetes remission programme in the NHS
A new study suggests rolling out a Type 2 diabetes remission programme in the NHS could cost around £1,067 per participant in its first year - or, factoring in the likelihood of success, £2,564 for each case of remission. Researchers say findings ‘make the case for shifting resources to offer remission' in the future.

Environment - 21.12.2018
Droughts boost emissions as hydropower dries up
Droughts boost emissions as hydropower dries up
Recent droughts caused increases in emissions of carbon dioxide and harmful air pollutants from power generation in several western states as fossil fuels came online to replace hampered hydroelectric power. A new study quantifies the impact. When hydropower runs low in a drought, western states tend to ramp up power generation - and emissions - from fossil fuels.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.12.2018
Q&A with Steve Palumbi on saving coral
Q&A with Steve Palumbi on saving coral
Heeding a growing call for action, a committee of scientists scrutinized every tool †available to save coral reefs and described a wealth of possibilities. As the climate warms up, ocean heat waves are damaging coral - causing what's known as coral bleaching. Scientists have established this fact and detailed the present and future consequences.

Environment - 21.12.2018
Divining Roots: revealing how plants branch out to access water
New research has discovered how plant roots sense the availability of moisture in soil and then adapt their shape to optimise acquisition of water. The discovery could enable crops to be bred which are more adaptive to changes in climate conditions, such as water scarcity, and help ensure food security in the future.

Social Sciences - 21.12.2018
Beauty and the grave: Sexism from Anglo-Saxon times
Beauty and the grave: Sexism from Anglo-Saxon times
Research shows how women in Anglo-Saxon England faced the same issue as many women today - age and beauty related sexism. Dr Christine Cave of the ANU School of Archaeology and Anthropology said her research suggested women of this era were typically valued for their youth and appearance, with their peak social status reached at around age 30.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2018
Bacteria rely on classic business model
Bacteria rely on classic business model
The pneumonia causing pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has developed a twin-track strategy to colonize its host. It generates two different cells - motile spreaders and virulent stickers. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now elucidated how the germ attaches to tissue within seconds and consecutively spreads.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.12.2018
Finds chloroform emissions, on the rise in East Asia, could delay ozone recovery by up to eight years
Finds chloroform emissions, on the rise in East Asia, could delay ozone recovery by up to eight years
Earlier this year, the United Nations announced that the ozone layer, which shields the Earth from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation, and which was severely depleted by decades of human-derived, ozone-destroying chemicals, is on the road to recovery. The dramatic turnaround is a direct result of regulations set by the 1987 Montreal Protocol, a global treaty under which nearly every country in the world, including the United States, successfully acted to ban the production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), the main agents of ozone depletion.

Life Sciences - Physics - 20.12.2018
Do colder temperatures affect lifespan? Depends on genetics
Big Brains Podcast Climate change's human cost with Michael Greenstone Why do we age? Despite more than a century of research, and a vast industry of youth-promising products, what causes our cells and organs to deteriorate with age is still unknown. One known factor is temperature: Many animal species live longer at lower temperature than they do at higher temperatures.

Pharmacology - Computer Science / Telecom - 20.12.2018
Concerns raised as opioid prescriptions rise across UK
Researchers recommend greater action to promote best practice as a new study reveals a rise in prescriptions of opioids for treating chronic pain rise between 1998 and 2018. A review of opioid prescribing in the UK has shown that UK doctors are prescribing more and stronger opioid drugs to patients.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.12.2018
Sulfate Helps Plants Cope With Water Scarcity
Plants absorb the mineral sulfate from groundwater. An international research team led by scientists from Heidelberg University has uncovered how sulfate controls the production of the drought stress hormone ABA in plants and thus contributes to their drought-resistance. These findings improve scientists' understanding of how the drought-stress signal travels from the roots to the leaves.

Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 20.12.2018
Newborn insects trapped in amber show first fossil evidence of how to crack an egg
Fossilised newborns, egg shells, and egg bursters preserved together in amber provide the first direct evidence of how insects hatched in deep time, according to a new article published today in the journal Palaeontology . One of the earliest and toughest trials that all organisms face is birth. The new findings give scientists evidence on how tiny insects broke the barrier separating them from life and took their first steps into an ancient forest.

Earth Sciences - 20.12.2018
£635,000 of fake whisky exposed
Laboratory tests at the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC) on 21 different bottles of rare Scotch whisky, potentially worth around £635,000, have confirmed them all as modern fakes. Based on these results, Rare Whisky 101 (RW101), one of the world's leading experts in rare whisky, has estimated that around £41million worth of rare whisky currently circulating in the secondary market, and present in existing collections, is fake.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 20.12.2018
CDC Says Carnegie Mellon’s Flu Forecasts Once Again Most Accurate
CMU's epidemiological forecasting systems get top marks four years in a row The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has announced that Carnegie Mellon University's forecasts of national and regional influenza activity during the 2017-2018 flu season were the most accurate of the 30 systems in its flu forecasting initiative.

Life Sciences - 20.12.2018
Gut-brain connection signals worms to alter behavior while eating
Gut-brain connection signals worms to alter behavior while eating
Study may lead to a better understanding of the digestive tract's nervous system. When a hungry worm encounters a rich food source, it immediately slows down so it can devour the feast. Once the worm is full, or the food runs out, it will begin roaming again. A new study from MIT now reveals more detail about how the worm's digestive tract signals the brain when to linger in a plentiful spot.

Environment - 20.12.2018
New threat to ozone recovery
New threat to ozone recovery
Study finds chloroform emissions, on the rise in East Asia, could delay ozone recovery by up to eight years. Earlier this year, the United Nations announced some much-needed, positive news about the environment: The ozone layer, which shields the Earth from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation, and which was severely depleted by decades of human-derived, ozone-destroying chemicals, is on the road to recovery.

Microtechnics - 20.12.2018
Artificial muscle’ takes origami to the next level
Imagine an electrically-powered device as thin as paper, as powerful as human muscle, and capable of lifting 1,000 times its own weight. Researchers from the University of Bristol have done precisely that, creating an artificial 'muscle' that could boost the power of anything from microrobots to space structures.

Environment - Physics - 20.12.2018
Measuring Individual Argon Atoms Helps In Understanding Ocean Ventilation
Measuring Individual Argon Atoms Helps In Understanding Ocean Ventilation
The age of the water in the world's oceans is critical for understanding ocean circulation, especially for the transport of gases from the atmosphere into the deep ocean. Researchers from Heidelberg University recently used an atomic physics technique they developed to determine the age of deep ocean water ranging from 50 to 1,000 years.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.12.2018
Experimental Alzheimer’s drug improves memory in mice
Health + Behavior UCLA RESEARCH ALERT Sarah C.P. Williams FINDINGS An experimental drug known as A03, which was previously developed to treat depression, increases the levels of the enzyme Sirtuin1, or SirT1, and improves memory in mice. The mice were genetically modified to have a protein called ApoE4, the most common genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease in humans that has been linked to some forms of the disease.