news 2018


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Results 61 - 80 of 4008.


Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 18.12.2018
Removing sweets and crisps from supermarket checkouts linked to dramatic fall in unhealthy snack purchases
Removing sweets and crisps from supermarket checkouts linked to dramatic fall in unhealthy snack purchases
Policies aimed at removing sweets and crisps from checkouts could lead to a dramatic reduction in the amount of unhealthy food purchased to eat 'on the go' and a significant reduction in that purchased to take home, suggests new research led by the University of Cambridge.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 18.12.2018
Lithium might work as an anti-aging drug, depending on your genes
There is growing evidence that lithium could be re-purposed as an anti-aging drug, and a new study from King's College London suggests that lithium's protective effects are due to a slowing down of the molecular aging process in cells. The research, published today in Neuropsychopharmacology , also finds some individuals may benefit from lithium's anti-aging properties more than others, depending on their genetics.

Environment - 18.12.2018
February's big patch of open water off Greenland? Not global warming, says new analysis
February’s big patch of open water off Greenland? Not global warming, says new analysis
In February 2018, a vast expanse of open water appeared in the sea ice above Greenland, a region that normally has sea ice well into the spring. The big pool of open water in the middle of the ice, known as a polynya , was a scientific puzzle. New analysis by researchers at the University of Washington and the University of Toronto Mississauga shows that odd winds are to blame, not simple global warming.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.12.2018
Gently stroking babies before medical procedures may reduce pain
Researchers have found that gently stroking a baby seems to reduce activity in the infant brain associated with painful experiences. The results, published in the journal Current Biology , suggest that lightly brushing an infant at a speed of approximately 3cm per second could provide effective pain relief before clinically necessary medical procedures.

Pharmacology - Health - 18.12.2018
Buruli Ulcer: Promising New Drug Candidate Against a Forgotten Disease
Buruli Ulcer: Promising New Drug Candidate Against a Forgotten Disease
Buruli ulcer is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) resulting in debilitating skin lesions, disabilities and stigmatisation. The current antibiotic treatment is long and has severe adverse side effects. Researchers from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) together with colleagues from Singapore have discovered a highly effective compound against Buruli ulcer which has the potential to become a powerful alternative to the existing treatment options.

Psychology - 18.12.2018
In the eye of the psychopath
The eyes of psychopaths have an unusual reaction when they are shown images of nasty things, such as mutilated bodies and threatening dogs, reveals a new study by researchers at Cardiff and Swansea Universities. The team examined the effect of nasty images on offenders who are psychopathic and offenders who aren't and found a marked difference in their eye response: the eyes of psychopathic offenders did not show pupil enlargement while those of non-psychopathic offenders did.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.12.2018
Mother's smoking affects baby's DNA and risk of smoking-related disease
Mother’s smoking affects baby’s DNA and risk of smoking-related disease
Smoking during pregnancy causes chemical changes to a baby's DNA that affect its risk of smoking-related conditions in adulthood, a study has found. The research, led by scientists at Imperial College London and the University of Oulu in Finland, analysed data from more than 18,000 people in several countries, including the UK, US and Australia, to study the impacts of maternal smoking on cardiovascular health.

Life Sciences - 18.12.2018
Regulating the Rapidly Developing Fruit Fly
Regulating the Rapidly Developing Fruit Fly
From birth, it takes humans almost two decades to reach adulthood; for a fruit fly, it takes only about 10 days. During a fly embryo's initial stages of development, the insect looks different from minute to minute, and its body plan is defined in just a few hours. Caltech researchers have now gained new insights into how a fly's genes influence this fast period of development-work that ultimately could shed light on the rapid cellular proliferation that occurs in other situations, including human cancers.

Innovation / Technology - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.12.2018
RFID Tag Arrays Track Body Movements, Shape Changes
Washable, battery-free tags could be cheaply embedded in clothing Carnegie Mellon University researchers have found ways to track body movements and detect shape changes using arrays of RFID tags. RFID-embedded clothing thus could be used to control avatars in video games - much like in the movie "Ready Player One." Or embedded clothing could to tell you when you should sit up straight - much like your mother.

Chemistry - 18.12.2018
KU Leuven researchers use sound waves to prevent small chemical reactors from clogging up
Companies are keen to use miniature chemical reactors to make pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals, but are discouraged by their tendency to clog up. Researchers at KU Leuven have now devised an elegant way of using sound waves to keep the chemicals flowing. The chemical industry conventionally produces in large batches, but this approach has drawbacks.

Environment - Life Sciences - 18.12.2018
Salmon may lose the ability to smell danger as carbon emissions rise
Salmon may lose the ability to smell danger as carbon emissions rise
The ability to smell is critical for salmon. They depend on scent to avoid predators, sniff out prey and find their way home at the end of their lives when they return to the streams where they hatched to spawn and die. New research from the University of Washington and NOAA Fisheries' Northwest Fisheries Science Center shows this powerful sense of smell might be in trouble as carbon emissions continue to be absorbed by our ocean.

Pharmacology - Health - 18.12.2018
Buruli ulcer: New drug against a forgotten disease
Buruli ulcer: New drug against a forgotten disease
Buruli ulcer is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) resulting in debilitating skin lesions and disabilities. The current antibiotic treatment is long and has severe adverse side effects. Researchers from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH), which is associated with the University of Basel, together with colleagues from Singapore have discovered a highly effective compound against Buruli ulcer.

Health - 18.12.2018
California teens who volunteer and engage in civic life are healthier, aim higher in education
Researchers discover gap by race, income between those interested in and those who participate in activity Venetia Lai High school teens in California who volunteer, take part in community aid groups, and join school or other clubs are healthier and more likely to aspire to attending college, according to a study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.12.2018
Get a warrant: researchers demand better DNA protections
New laws are required to control access to medical genetic data by law enforcement agencies, an analysis by University of Queensland researchers has found. The academics from biology, policy and law say a Genetic Data Protection Act is needed to maintain public trust in medical genetics. UQ's Dr Caitlin Curtis said advances in technology meant genetic tests were increasingly revealing, providing information about health, predisposition to disease, and even behaviour and mental health.

Physics - 18.12.2018
System monitors radiation damage to materials in real-time
System monitors radiation damage to materials in real-time
Facility could rapidly provide data on how material properties change in a nuclear reactor. In order to evaluate a material's ability to withstand the high-radiation environment inside a nuclear reactor, researchers have traditionally used a method known as "cook and look," meaning the material is exposed to high radiation and then removed for a physical examination.

Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
Progress in Super-Resolution Microscopy
Progress in Super-Resolution Microscopy
/2018 Does expansion microscopy deliver true-to-life images of cellular structures' That was not sure yet. A new publication in "Nature Methods" shows for the first time that the method actually works reliably. Immersing deeper and deeper into cells with the microscope. Imaging the nucleus and other structures more and more accurately.

Career - 17.12.2018
Young women prefer family men
Social media are buzzing with hashtags like #hotdaddy and blog posts la 'How to get your husband to help out around the house.' The idea that women are attracted to men who are willing to set aside their career in favour of their family has now also been supported by research conducted by Dr Loes Meussen.

Physics - 17.12.2018
Deep learning takes fluorescence microscopy into super resolution
Deep learning takes fluorescence microscopy into super resolution
Science + Technology UCLA-led team produces images on a laptop that match the quality of those from high-end equipment Wayne Lewis Scientists studying the mysteries of life sometimes rely upon fluorescence microscopy to get a close look at living cells. The technique involves dyeing parts of cells so that they glow under special lighting, revealing cellular structures that measure smaller than one-millionth of a meter.

Environment - Chemistry - 17.12.2018
Carbon Fuels Get Greener for Renewable Energy
Carbon Fuels Get Greener for Renewable Energy
Researchers discover copper has potential as a catalyst for turning carbon dioxide into sustainable chemicals and fuels without any wasteful byproducts, creating a green alternative to present-day chemical manufacturing For decades, scientists have searched for effective ways to remove excess carbon dioxide emissions from the air, and recycle them into products such as renewable fuels.

Computer Science / Telecom - 17.12.2018
Machine learning-detected signal predicts time to earthquake
Machine learning-detected signal predicts time to earthquake
Researchers applied machine learning to analyze Cascadia data and discovered the megathrust broadcasts a constant tremor, a fingerprint of the fault's displacement. Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers applied machine-learning expertise to predict quakes along Cascadia, a 700-mile-long fault from northern California to southern British Columbia that flanks cities such as Seattle.