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Computer Science / Telecom - Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
New AI system developed at UCLA, Stanford mimics how humans visualize and identify objects
New AI system developed at UCLA, Stanford mimics how humans visualize and identify objects
UCLA and Stanford University engineers have demonstrated a computer system that can discover and identify the real-world objects it “sees” based on the same method of visual learning that humans use. The system is an advance in a type of technology called “computer vision,” which enables computers to read and identify visual images.

Palaeontology - Earth Sciences - 17.12.2018
New discovery pushes origin of feathers back by 70 million years
New discovery pushes origin of feathers back by 70 million years
An international team of palaeontologists, which includes the University of Bristol, has discovered that the flying reptiles, pterosaurs, actually had four kinds of feathers, and these are shared with dinosaurs - pushing back the origin of feathers by some 70 million years. Pterosaurs are the flying reptiles that lived side by side with dinosaurs, 230 to 66 million years ago.

Health - 17.12.2018
Are Fitbits the answer to nurse fatigue?
For News Media Millions of individuals already use tiny fitness trackers to prompt physical activity in hopes of improving their health. Now a UW-Madison School of Nursing professor is taking them a step further by using them to track nurse movement in hospitals. The hope is to uncover important data about what causes fatigue in the work environment and what health systems can do to minimize its impact not only on nurses but on patients as well.

Innovation / Technology - 17.12.2018
UW Evans School study of Fauntleroy ferry service proposes improvements to technology, engagement
Suggested upgrades to technology, training and communication - and funding them appropriately - lie at the heart of recommendations to the state from researchers at the University of Washington after a months-long study of service at the Fauntleroy Ferry Terminal in West Seattle. They also suggest: Ramp up the ferries' social media presence and other public engagement efforts, use "Good to Go!” tolling technology and expand mobile transactions to improve ticketing and loading processes.

Politics - Psychology - 17.12.2018
How a workshop about getting along became a story stoking division
How a workshop about getting along became a story stoking division
It was a small study, really - the seed of research to examine political beliefs among college students and the bridging of partisan divides. Noting that conservative students in particular, might feel isolated on campus, in 2017 the University of Washington's Jonathan Kanter and his students designed a half-day workshop to help a couple dozen participants understand each other better, then followed up a month later to see how their opinions about political "others" had changed, if at all.

Computer Science / Telecom - 17.12.2018
Artificial intelligence for better computer graphics
Artificial intelligence for better computer graphics
[ Florian Aigner At the TU Wien (Vienna), neural networks have been developed which make it much easier to create photorealistic pictures of a wide variety of materials. If computer-generated images are to look realistic, different materials have to be presented differently: The metallic sheen of a coin looks quite different from the dull gloss of a wooden plate or the slightly transparent skin of a grape.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
New Avenue of Investigation for Cancer Therapy Discovered at Carnegie Mellon Qatar
Project inspires CMU-Q alumnus to pursue career in cancer research A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar (CMU-Q) has discovered a new area of research that could lead to more effective cancer treatment with fewer side effects. Ihab Younis, assistant professor of biological sciences, and Ettaib El Marabti, a 2017 graduate of CMU-Q's Biological Sciences Program , have revealed that the cellular mechanism called minor intron splicing is different in cancer cells than in normal cells.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 17.12.2018
Mapping the brain, cell by cell
Mapping the brain, cell by cell
Technique for preserving tissue allows researchers to create maps of neural circuits with single-cell resolution. MIT chemical engineers and neuroscientists have devised a new way to preserve biological tissue, allowing them to visualize proteins, DNA, and other molecules within cells, and to map the connections between neurons.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.12.2018
Discovery of novel mechanisms that cause migraines
Discovery of novel mechanisms that cause migraines
PARIS, 17 december 2018 Researchers at CNRS, Université Côte d'Azur and Inserm have demonstrated a new mechanism related to the onset of migraine. In fact, they found how a mutation, causes dysfunction in a protein which inhibits neuronal electrical activity, induces migraines. These results, published in Neuron on December 17, 2018, open a new path for the development of anti-migraine medicines.

Environment - 17.12.2018
Drones can detect protected nightjar nests
Thermal-sensing cameras mounted on drones may offer a safer and more cost-effective way to locate nests of the elusive European nightjar in forestry work and construction areas, finds new research by Cardiff University. The team from the University's School of Biosciences conducted a pilot study in Bryn, a Natural Resources Wales conifer plantation in South Wales, to test the suitability of drones to detect nest sites of the protected bird.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.12.2018
How liquid droplets grow in cells
How liquid droplets grow in cells
For more than 100 years, biologists have known that cells contain various kinds of membraneless organelles and conjectured what organizing principles underlie them. During the past decade, liquid-liquid phase separation has emerged as one of the concepts that can explain these cellular structures. Phase separation has become an increasingly hot topic, as it can be related to pathologies such as neurodegenerative diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
Clues to chronic fatigue syndrome in overactive immune response
New research from King's College London finds that an exaggerated immune response can trigger long-lasting fatigue, potentially explaining how chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) begins. The study is the most in-depth biological investigation yet into the role of the immune system in lasting symptoms of fatigue.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.12.2018
A diet rich in cheese in early childhood may protect against allergies
A diet rich in cheese in early childhood may protect against allergies
A study conducted by the University Hospital of Besançon and INRA shows the protective effect of high cheese consumption from a very young age. For the first time, a link has been established between cheese consumption and the probability of developing food or skin allergic diseases, regardless of the consumption of various other foods (vegetables or fruits, cereals, bread, meat, cake and yogurt) and living conditions in a farm environment (presence and diversity of farm animals).

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.12.2018
A diet rich in cheese in early childhood could protect against allergies
A diet rich in cheese in early childhood could protect against allergies
A study conducted by the University Hospital of Besançon and INRA shows the protective effect of high cheese consumption from a very young age. For the first time, a link has been established between cheese consumption and the probability of developing food or skin allergic diseases, regardless of the consumption of various other foods (vegetables or fruits, cereals, bread, meat, cake and yogurt) and living conditions in a farm environment (presence and diversity of farm animals).

Physics - 17.12.2018
Data storage using individual molecules
Data storage using individual molecules
Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal small, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.12.2018
Could cancer anti-sickness drug end the misery for IBS patients?
Could a commonly-prescribed anti-sickness drug be the answer for the 1.3 million people in the UK who suffer the pain and misery of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea (IBS-D)? A nationwide clinical trial led by researchers at The University of Nottingham and funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) will assess the medication ondansetron, which is currently used by doctors to help cancer patients cope with the nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
The importance of ’edge populations’ to biodiversity
More than two-thirds of Canada's biodiversity is made up of species that occur within the country's borders only at the very northern edge of their range. Biologists have long debated how much effort should be dedicated to conserving these "edge populations." One argument in their favour is that they may be especially well suited to lead northward range shifts for their species as the climate warms.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 17.12.2018
Wound care revolution: Put away your rulers and reach for your phone
Monitoring a wound is critical, especially in diabetic patients, whose lack of sensation due to nerve damage can lead to infection of a lesion and, ultimately, amputation. Clinicians and healthcare professionals at the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) and other hospitals believe that the use of a new app, Swift Skin and Wound(TM), which accurately measures and charts the progression of skin wounds, could potentially have a significant impact on clinical management and patient outcomes.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2018
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Schistosomiasis is a parasitic worm infection affecting 250 million people globally. The current prevalence thresholds for preventive chemotherapy of schistosomiasis are based on the Kato-Katz method using stool samples. A new more sensitive point-of-care urine test is now available in particular for settings with low prevalence.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.12.2018
Newly identified enzyme could play key role in childbirth, muscle diseases
Scientists at Stanford have solved a 50-year-old mystery that could open up new areas of research into muscle disorders. The study revealed a human enzyme that modifies muscle proteins to help them grow and remain strong. Facebook Twitter Email Since the 1960s, scientists have known of a modification that occurs to a particular molecule in muscles, especially after exercise.