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Environment - 28.12.2018
7 times Imperial made you double-take in 2018
Some surprise headlines need a second look, and quirky studies can often have serious impact on our lives. From holographic teachers to turtles that breathe through their genitals, here are a handful of the stories that made readers do a double-take in 2018. Napoleon dynamite In August, research from Dr Matthew Genge revealed that electrically charged volcanic ash short-circuited Earth's atmosphere in 1815 causing global poor weather - and Napoleon's defeat at the Battle of Waterloo.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.12.2018
Forget-me-not: Scientists pinpoint memory mechanism in plants
Plant scientists at the Universities of Birmingham and Nottingham have unravelled a mechanism that enables flowering plants to sense and ‘remember' changes in their environment. The research, published , reveals potential new targets that could support the development of new plant varieties, including cereals and vegetables, that can adapt to different environmental conditions.

Environment - 21.12.2018
Droughts boost emissions as hydropower dries up
Droughts boost emissions as hydropower dries up
Recent droughts caused increases in emissions of carbon dioxide and harmful air pollutants from power generation in several western states as fossil fuels came online to replace hampered hydroelectric power. A new study quantifies the impact. When hydropower runs low in a drought, western states tend to ramp up power generation - and emissions - from fossil fuels.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.12.2018
Q&A with Steve Palumbi on saving coral
Q&A with Steve Palumbi on saving coral
Heeding a growing call for action, a committee of scientists scrutinized every tool  available to save coral reefs and described a wealth of possibilities. As the climate warms up, ocean heat waves are damaging coral - causing what's known as coral bleaching. Scientists have established this fact and detailed the present and future consequences.

Environment - 21.12.2018
Divining Roots: revealing how plants branch out to access water
New research has discovered how plant roots sense the availability of moisture in soil and then adapt their shape to optimise acquisition of water. The discovery could enable crops to be bred which are more adaptive to changes in climate conditions, such as water scarcity, and help ensure food security in the future.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.12.2018
Finds chloroform emissions, on the rise in East Asia, could delay ozone recovery by up to eight years
Finds chloroform emissions, on the rise in East Asia, could delay ozone recovery by up to eight years
Earlier this year, the United Nations announced that the ozone layer, which shields the Earth from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation, and which was severely depleted by decades of human-derived, ozone-destroying chemicals, is on the road to recovery. The dramatic turnaround is a direct result of regulations set by the 1987 Montreal Protocol, a global treaty under which nearly every country in the world, including the United States, successfully acted to ban the production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), the main agents of ozone depletion.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.12.2018
Sulfate Helps Plants Cope With Water Scarcity
Plants absorb the mineral sulfate from groundwater. An international research team led by scientists from Heidelberg University has uncovered how sulfate controls the production of the drought stress hormone ABA in plants and thus contributes to their drought-resistance. These findings improve scientists' understanding of how the drought-stress signal travels from the roots to the leaves.

Environment - 20.12.2018
New threat to ozone recovery
New threat to ozone recovery
Study finds chloroform emissions, on the rise in East Asia, could delay ozone recovery by up to eight years. Earlier this year, the United Nations announced some much-needed, positive news about the environment: The ozone layer, which shields the Earth from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation, and which was severely depleted by decades of human-derived, ozone-destroying chemicals, is on the road to recovery.

Environment - Physics - 20.12.2018
Measuring Individual Argon Atoms Helps In Understanding Ocean Ventilation
Measuring Individual Argon Atoms Helps In Understanding Ocean Ventilation
The age of the water in the world's oceans is critical for understanding ocean circulation, especially for the transport of gases from the atmosphere into the deep ocean. Researchers from Heidelberg University recently used an atomic physics technique they developed to determine the age of deep ocean water ranging from 50 to 1,000 years.

Computer Science / Telecom - Environment - 20.12.2018
Loss of intertidal ecosystem exposes coastal communities
Loss of intertidal ecosystem exposes coastal communities
Artificial intelligence and extensive satellite imagery have allowed researchers to map the world's intertidal zones for the first time, revealing a significant loss of the crucial ecosystem. The University of Queensland and University of New South Wales study has shown that global foreshore environments declined by up to 16 per cent between 1984 and 2016.

Environment - Computer Science / Telecom - 19.12.2018
Inventory indicates who goes solar and why
Stanford researchers have identified the GPS locations and sizes of almost all U.S. solar power installations from a billion images. Using the data, which are public, they identified factors that promote the use of solar energy and those that discourage it. Knowing which Americans have installed solar panels on their roofs and why they did so would be enormously useful for managing the changing U.S. electricity system and to understanding the barriers to greater use of renewable resources.

Environment - 19.12.2018
"Climate change likely to accelerate"
Natural climate buffers feeling effects of higher temperatures, UAntwerp biologists find. Ecosystems like forests sequester large amounts of carbon dioxide and therefore help to slow down global warming. These ecosystems are, however, increasingly becoming the victims of rising temperatures, according to new research led by the University of Antwerp.

Environment - Social Sciences - 19.12.2018
Gaming route leads to solid results
Gaming route leads to solid results
Should a wind farm be built in a particular region, or is the integrity of the landscape a more important consideration? How should the wastewater infrastructure be designed in the future? Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is a recognised tool for weighing up such environmental questions, and an important stage of the methodology is to ascertain the preferences of those involved: What is important to them when making their decision? What g

Environment - 19.12.2018
‘Pause’ in global warming was never real, new research proves
Claims of a 'pause' in observed global temperature warming are comprehensively disproved in a pair of new studies published today. An international team of climate researchers reviewed existing data and studies and reanalysed them. They concluded there has never been a statistically significant ‘pause' in global warming.

Environment - 18.12.2018
February's big patch of open water off Greenland? Not global warming, says new analysis
February’s big patch of open water off Greenland? Not global warming, says new analysis
In February 2018, a vast expanse of open water appeared in the sea ice above Greenland, a region that normally has sea ice well into the spring. The big pool of open water in the middle of the ice, known as a polynya , was a scientific puzzle. New analysis by researchers at the University of Washington and the University of Toronto Mississauga shows that odd winds are to blame, not simple global warming.

Environment - Life Sciences - 18.12.2018
Salmon may lose the ability to smell danger as carbon emissions rise
Salmon may lose the ability to smell danger as carbon emissions rise
The ability to smell is critical for salmon. They depend on scent to avoid predators, sniff out prey and find their way home at the end of their lives when they return to the streams where they hatched to spawn and die. New research from the University of Washington and NOAA Fisheries' Northwest Fisheries Science Center shows this powerful sense of smell might be in trouble as carbon emissions continue to be absorbed by our ocean.

Environment - Chemistry - 17.12.2018
Carbon Fuels Get Greener for Renewable Energy
Carbon Fuels Get Greener for Renewable Energy
Researchers discover copper has potential as a catalyst for turning carbon dioxide into sustainable chemicals and fuels without any wasteful byproducts, creating a green alternative to present-day chemical manufacturing For decades, scientists have searched for effective ways to remove excess carbon dioxide emissions from the air, and recycle them into products such as renewable fuels.

Environment - 17.12.2018
Drones can detect protected nightjar nests
Thermal-sensing cameras mounted on drones may offer a safer and more cost-effective way to locate nests of the elusive European nightjar in forestry work and construction areas, finds new research by Cardiff University. The team from the University's School of Biosciences conducted a pilot study in Bryn, a Natural Resources Wales conifer plantation in South Wales, to test the suitability of drones to detect nest sites of the protected bird.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
The importance of ’edge populations’ to biodiversity
More than two-thirds of Canada's biodiversity is made up of species that occur within the country's borders only at the very northern edge of their range. Biologists have long debated how much effort should be dedicated to conserving these "edge populations." One argument in their favour is that they may be especially well suited to lead northward range shifts for their species as the climate warms.

Environment - Administration - 13.12.2018
Mounting evidence justifies EPA’s regulation of greenhouse gases
Sixteen prominent climate scientists argue that there is more reason than ever for the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate greenhouse gases, at the same time some politicians are pushing the EPA to reverse its 2009 decision to do so. In a paper appearing in the Dec.
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