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Pedagogy - Computer Science / Telecom - 28.09.2018
New software helps analyze writing disabilities
Nearly 10% of elementary school students have trouble learning to write, with potentially lasting consequences on their education. EPFL researchers have developed a software program that can analyze these children's writing disabilities and their causes with unparalleled precision. Trouble learning how to write, called dysgraphia, affects some 10% of schoolchildren.

Pedagogy - Health - 10.08.2018
Men take care of their spouses just as well as women
Men respond to their spouse's illness just as much as women do and as a result are better caregivers in later life than previous research suggests, according to a new Oxford University collaboration. Men respond to their spouse's illness just as much as women do and as a result are better caregivers in later life than previous research suggests, according to a new Oxford University collaboration.

Pedagogy - Health - 31.07.2018
Young people don't understand the impact of age when planning a family
Young people don’t understand the impact of age when planning a family
Most students underestimate how much age affects the chance of having a baby, according to new research published today. The study, involving 1215 University of Melbourne students, found less than half correctly identified 35-39 years as the age at which female fertility declines significantly and less than one in five correctly identified 45-49 years as the age when male fertility declines.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 20.07.2018
Young people who frequently argue with their parents are better citizens, research finds
Teenagers who regularly clash with their parents are more likely to have given time to a charity or humanitarian cause, a study has shown. The survey of 13 and 14 year-olds carried out by academics at Cardiff University, showed those who argued “a lot” with their mother and father, compared to those who “never” argued, were also more likely to have been involved with a human rights organisation in the past 12 months and to have contacted a politician or signed a petition.

Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 14.06.2018
'Teachers are brain engineers': UW study shows how intensive instruction changes brain circuitry in struggling readers
’Teachers are brain engineers’: UW study shows how intensive instruction changes brain circuitry in struggling readers
The early years are when the brain develops the most, forming neural connections that pave the way for how a child - and the eventual adult - will express feelings, embark on a task, and learn new skills and concepts. Scientists have even theorized that the anatomical structure of neural connections forms the basis for how children identify letters and recognize words.

Continuing Education - Pedagogy - 13.06.2018
Where boys and girls do better in math, English
A review of test scores from 10,000 school district finds that gender gaps in math and English vary with community wealth and racial diversity. When Stanford Professor Sean Reardon and his research team set out to take an unprecedented look at how elementary school girls and boys compare in academic achievement, they expected to find similar stereotype-driven patterns across all 10,000 U.S. school districts: boys consistently outperforming girls in math and girls steadily surpassing boys in reading and writing by a wide margin.

Pedagogy - Health - 12.06.2018
Mother's attitude towards baby during pregnancy may have implications for child's development
Mother’s attitude towards baby during pregnancy may have implications for child’s development
Mothers who 'connect' with their baby during pregnancy are more likely to interact in a more positive way with their infant after it is born, according to a study carried out at the University of Cambridge. Interaction is important for helping infants learn and develop. Although we found a relationship between a mother's attitude towards her baby during pregnancy and her later interactions, this link was only modest.

Pedagogy - Business / Economics - 05.06.2018
Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare
Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare
Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds, a new UCL study has found.  However, the research by the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), shows the same universal childcare, only has a modest impact on the school readiness of children from advantaged backgrounds.  The study, which looked at German school entry exam data, also shows that immigrant children and children from disadvantaged backgrounds are less likely to attend childcare at age three.

Religions - Pedagogy - 17.04.2018
Religiously engaged adolescents demonstrate habits that help them get better grades
Study suggests that being religious helps adolescents get better grades because they are rewarded for being conscientious and cooperative. Adolescents who practice religion on a regular basis do better in school than those who are religiously disengaged, according to new research from Stanford Graduate School of Education (GSE).

Health - Pedagogy - 05.04.2018
Three-quarters of COPD cases are linked to childhood risk factors that are exacerbated in adulthood
Three-quarters of COPD cases are linked to childhood risk factors that are exacerbated in adulthood
Three-quarters of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cases have their origins in poor lung function pathways beginning in childhood. These pathways are associated with exposures in childhood, and amplified by factors in adulthood, according to a cohort study published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal.

Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 13.02.2018
Back-and-forth exchanges boost children's brain response to language
Back-and-forth exchanges boost children’s brain response to language
A landmark 1995 study found that children from higher-income families hear about 30 million more words during their first three years of life than children from lower-income families. This "30-million-word gap" correlates with significant differences in tests of vocabulary, language development, and reading comprehension.