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Physics - Materials Science - 31.12.2018
Physicists record "lifetime" of graphene qubits
First measurement of its kind could provide stepping stone to practical quantum computing. Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have recorded, for the first time, the "temporal coherence" of a graphene qubit - meaning how long it can maintain a special state that allows it to represent two logical states simultaneously.

Physics - Pharmacology - 31.12.2018
The 10 most popular Imperial news stories of 2018
The past 12 months have provided many eye-grabbing headlines from the Imperial community, from world-leading research to incredible innovations. Before 2019 is upon us, we take a quick look back at the most popular articles on our award-winning news site (ranked by the number of page views). Here are our top 10 stories of 2018.

Physics - 28.12.2018
Fermilab scientists lead quest to find elusive fourth kind of neutrino
Neutrinos, ghostly fundamental particles that are famously difficult to study, could provide scientists with clues about the evolution of the universe. They are so difficult to catch, in fact, that it's possible there's a fourth type that's been hiding right under our noses for decades. Scientists at the UChicago-affiliated Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory , site of the most extensive neutrino research in the world, are leading an international collaboration to explore the possibility of a completely new particle.

Physics - Chemistry - 27.12.2018
Research honored with Physics World
Research honored with Physics World "Breakthrough of the Year" awards
"Magic-angle" graphene named 2018 Breakthrough of the Year; first ionic plane and earliest evidence of hydrogen gas named to top 10 breakthroughs. Three scientific and engineering advances led by researchers in the MIT community have been named to Physics World's  10 Breakthroughs of 2018. One MIT-led discovery received the magazine's top honor: 2018 Breakthrough of the Year.

Physics - Chemistry - 27.12.2018
Machine learning speeds up atomistic simulations of water and ice
Machine learning speeds up atomistic simulations of water and ice
Why is water densest at around 4 degrees Celsius' Why does ice float? Why does heavy water have a different melting point compared to normal water? Why do snowflakes have a six-fold symmetry? A collaborative study of researchers from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, the University of Göttingen and the University of Vienna and just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, provides physical insights into these questions by marrying data-driven machine learning techniques and quantum mechanics.

Physics - 24.12.2018
Joy of giving lasts longer than the joy of getting
Big Brains Podcast Climate change's human cost with Michael Greenstone The happiness we feel after a particular event or activity diminishes each time we experience that event, a phenomenon known as hedonic adaptation. But giving to others may be the exception to this rule, according to new research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.12.2018
ESA sets clock by distant spinning stars
ESA sets clock by distant spinning stars
ESA's technical centre in the Netherlands has begun running a pulsar-based clock. The 'PulChron' system measures the passing of time using millisecond-frequency radio pulses from multiple fast-spinning neutron stars. Operating since the end of November, this pulsar-based timing system is hosted in the Galileo Timing and Geodetic Validation Facility of ESA's ESTEC establishment, at Noordwijk in the Netherlands, and relies on ongoing observations by a five-strong array of radio telescopes across Europe.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.12.2018
Fast fine art : 19th century painting tricks revealed
Fast fine art : 19th century painting tricks revealed
Paris, 9 January 2017 To paint quickly while creating exceptional texture and volume effects, J. M. W. Turner and other English artists of his generation relied on the development of innovative gels. All the rage in the 19th century—and still in use today—these compounds alter the properties of the oil paints they are combined with.

Life Sciences - Physics - 20.12.2018
Do colder temperatures affect lifespan? Depends on genetics
Big Brains Podcast Climate change's human cost with Michael Greenstone Why do we age? Despite more than a century of research, and a vast industry of youth-promising products, what causes our cells and organs to deteriorate with age is still unknown. One known factor is temperature: Many animal species live longer at lower temperature than they do at higher temperatures.

Environment - Physics - 20.12.2018
Measuring Individual Argon Atoms Helps In Understanding Ocean Ventilation
Measuring Individual Argon Atoms Helps In Understanding Ocean Ventilation
The age of the water in the world's oceans is critical for understanding ocean circulation, especially for the transport of gases from the atmosphere into the deep ocean. Researchers from Heidelberg University recently used an atomic physics technique they developed to determine the age of deep ocean water ranging from 50 to 1,000 years.

Life Sciences - Physics - 19.12.2018
Scientists build flashlights to peek inside the ’garbage disposal’ of cells
Big Brains Podcast Climate change's human cost with Michael Greenstone The story of the lysosome is a classic smear campaign. Once dismissed as the garbage disposal of the cell-it does break down unneeded cell debris-it is now valued by scientists who realized all that dirty work also controls survival, metabolism, longevity and even neurodegenerative diseases.

Life Sciences - Physics - 19.12.2018
Ers Make World's Smallest Tic-Tac-Toe Game Board with DNA
Ers Make World’s Smallest Tic-Tac-Toe Game Board with DNA
Move over Mona Lisa , here comes tic-tac-toe. It was just about a year ago that Caltech scientists in the laboratory of Lulu Qian , assistant professor of bioengineering, announced they had used a technique known as DNA origami to create tiles that could be designed to self-assemble into larger nanostructures that carry predesigned patterns.

Physics - 19.12.2018
Quantum Tricks to Unveil the Secrets of Topological Materials
Quantum Tricks to Unveil the Secrets of Topological Materials
[ Florian Aigner "Topological materials" are very interesting for technology, but difficult to study. TU Wien (Vienna) and the University of Science and Technology in China are presenting new approaches. Electrons are not just little spheres, bouncing through a material like a rubber ball. The laws of quantum physics tell us that electrons behave like waves.

Physics - 18.12.2018
System monitors radiation damage to materials in real-time
System monitors radiation damage to materials in real-time
Facility could rapidly provide data on how material properties change in a nuclear reactor. In order to evaluate a material's ability to withstand the high-radiation environment inside a nuclear reactor, researchers have traditionally used a method known as "cook and look," meaning the material is exposed to high radiation and then removed for a physical examination.

Physics - 17.12.2018
Deep learning takes fluorescence microscopy into super resolution
Deep learning takes fluorescence microscopy into super resolution
Science + Technology UCLA-led team produces images on a laptop that match the quality of those from high-end equipment Wayne Lewis Scientists studying the mysteries of life sometimes rely upon fluorescence microscopy to get a close look at living cells. The technique involves dyeing parts of cells so that they glow under special lighting, revealing cellular structures that measure smaller than one-millionth of a meter.

Physics - 17.12.2018
Data storage using individual molecules
Data storage using individual molecules
Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal small, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

Physics - Transport - 13.12.2018
Invention promises airport security screening without queues
Invention promises airport security screening without queues
A research team led by The Australian National University (ANU) has invented a device that could be developed into ultra-sensitive cameras for security screening which would not require people to queue at airports. Other applications could include smaller and safer sensors for driverless vehicles. Lead researcher Dr Mingkai Liu said the research had already led to a proof-of-concept prototype device and provisional patent.

Physics - Materials Science - 13.12.2018
Team invents method to shrink objects to the nanoscale
Team invents method to shrink objects to the nanoscale
It's not quite the Ant-Man suit, but the system produces 3-D structures one thousandth the size of the originals. MIT researchers have invented a way to fabricate nanoscale 3-D objects of nearly any shape. They can also pattern the objects with a variety of useful materials, including metals, quantum dots, and DNA.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 13.12.2018
Tangled magnetic fields power cosmic particle accelerators
SLAC scientists find a new way to explain how a black hole's plasma jets boost particles to the highest energies observed in the universe. The results could also prove useful for fusion and accelerator research on Earth. Menlo Park, Calif. Magnetic field lines tangled like spaghetti in a bowl might be behind the most powerful particle accelerators in the universe.

Physics - Chemistry - 13.12.2018
Scientists design custom nanoparticles with new ’stencil’ method
Big Brains Podcast Climate change's human cost with Michael Greenstone Nano-sized particles already make bicycles and tennis rackets lighter and stronger, protect eyeglasses from scratches, and help direct chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells. But their usefulness depends on being able to precisely sculpt them into the right configurations-no easy task when they're so tiny that thousands of them could fit into the thickness of a sheet of paper.
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