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Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.12.2018
Finds chloroform emissions, on the rise in East Asia, could delay ozone recovery by up to eight years
Finds chloroform emissions, on the rise in East Asia, could delay ozone recovery by up to eight years
Earlier this year, the United Nations announced that the ozone layer, which shields the Earth from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation, and which was severely depleted by decades of human-derived, ozone-destroying chemicals, is on the road to recovery. The dramatic turnaround is a direct result of regulations set by the 1987 Montreal Protocol, a global treaty under which nearly every country in the world, including the United States, successfully acted to ban the production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), the main agents of ozone depletion.

Earth Sciences - 20.12.2018
635,000 of fake whisky exposed
Laboratory tests at the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC) on 21 different bottles of rare Scotch whisky, potentially worth around 635,000, have confirmed them all as modern fakes. Based on these results, Rare Whisky 101 (RW101), one of the world's leading experts in rare whisky, has estimated that around 41million worth of rare whisky currently circulating in the secondary market, and present in existing collections, is fake.

Earth Sciences - 18.12.2018
When ’aliens’ attack Antarctica: Terrestrial ecosystems are vulnerable to single introduced insect species
A study by the University of Birmingham and Loughborough University has shown that regular weighing at home and simple tips to curb excess eating and drinking can prevent people from piling on the pounds at Christmas. Researchers, supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and funded by the University of Birmingham, carried out the 'Winter Weight Watch Study' - a trial that aimed to prevent participants from gaining weight over the festive season by arming them with tips and techniques to avoid overindulging.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science - 17.12.2018
Machine learning-detected signal predicts time to earthquake
Machine learning-detected signal predicts time to earthquake
Researchers applied machine learning to analyze Cascadia data and discovered the megathrust broadcasts a constant tremor, a fingerprint of the fault's displacement. Cascadia's behavior was buried in the data. Until machine learning revealed precise patterns, we all discarded the continuous signal as noise, but it was full of rich information.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 17.12.2018
New discovery pushes origin of feathers back by 70 million years
New discovery pushes origin of feathers back by 70 million years
An international team of palaeontologists, which includes the University of Bristol, has discovered that the flying reptiles, pterosaurs, actually had four kinds of feathers, and these are shared with dinosaurs - pushing back the origin of feathers by some 70 million years. Pterosaurs are the flying reptiles that lived side by side with dinosaurs, 230 to 66 million years ago.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 11.12.2018
Sierra Snowpack Could Drop Significantly By End of Century
Sierra Snowpack Could Drop Significantly By End of Century
A future warmer world will almost certainly feature a decline in fresh water from the Sierra Nevada mountain snowpack. Now a new study by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) that analyzed the headwater regions of California's 10 major reservoirs, representing nearly half of the state's surface storage, found they could see on average a 79 percent drop in peak snowpack water volume by 2100.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 06.12.2018
Biggest extinction in Earth's history caused by global warming leaving ocean animals gasping for breath
Biggest extinction in Earth’s history caused by global warming leaving ocean animals gasping for breath
The largest extinction in Earth's history marked the end of the Permian period, some 252 million years ago. Long before dinosaurs, our planet was populated with plants and animals that were mostly obliterated after a series of massive volcanic eruptions in Siberia. Fossils in ancient seafloor rocks display a thriving and diverse marine ecosystem, then a swath of corpses.

Earth Sciences - 05.12.2018
Volcanoes fed by ‘mush’ reservoirs rather than molten magma chambers
Volcanoes are not fed by molten magma formed in large chambers finds a new study, overturning classic ideas about volcanic eruptions. Instead, the study suggests that volcanoes are fed by so-called 'mush reservoirs' - areas of mostly solid crystals with magma in the small spaces between the crystals.

Earth Sciences - 04.12.2018
Volcanoes fed by ’mush’ reservoirs rather than molten magma chambers
Volcanoes are not fed by molten magma formed in large chambers finds a new study, overturning classic ideas about volcanic eruptions. Instead, the study suggests that volcanoes are fed by so-called 'mush reservoirs' - areas of mostly solid crystals with magma in the small spaces between the crystals.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 29.11.2018
The polar regions communicate via postcards and text messages
The polar regions communicate via postcards and text messages
A new study found two types of climatic connection between the North Atlantic and Antarctica. One is a rapid atmospheric channel and the other a much slower connection through the ocean. During the last glacial period, these links resulted in abrupt climatic changes - and could so again in future. In a study just published in the journal "Nature", an international team of researchers describes how an ocean current repeatedly strengthening and weakening again 60,000 to 12,000 years ago led to an extremely sudden change in the climate.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 28.11.2018
Scientists inch closer to revealing mysteries of Red Planet
Scientists inch closer to revealing mysteries of Red Planet
The 300-million-mile journey that culminated in NASA's InSight landing on Mars this week represents a major scientific coup for all involved, including mission participants from the University of Bristol. The 635m lander, which came to rest on Mars on Monday, will study the makeup and dimensions of the Red Planet's core.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 26.11.2018
Even the ancient Romans were polluters
Even the ancient Romans were polluters
"We are polluting the rivers and the natural elements, and even ruining the very thing that is essential to life - the air." These words were not spoken by nature conservationists in the 21st century but flowed from the pen of the Roman scholar Pliny the Elder. In fact ancient history researchers agree today that even in Roman times the environment was being polluted - by unfiltered wastewater, the mining of metals such as iron or lead and clear-cutting of the forests.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 23.11.2018
Belgian researchers will spend Christmas in Antarctica to understand climate change
On 1 December, a team of glaciologists and climate researchers from ULB , UCLouvain and the University of Colorado will head for the Antarctic. On the agenda is the second field campaign for the Mass2Ant project being coordinated by UCLouvain , which also includes partners from the IRM (the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium) and Delft University of Technology.

Earth Sciences - 22.11.2018
Rewriting our evolutionary history
Rewriting our evolutionary history
Field photograph of massive flowstone layers from one of the South African hominin caves, with red cave sediments underneath. Photo credit: Dr Robyn Pickering Prehistoric secrets from the early hominin ancestors of humans that lived 3.4 million years ago are being revealed by an international team of researchers.

Earth Sciences - 22.11.2018
Cats and foxes pose greatest risk to these twelve mammals
Cats and foxes pose greatest risk to these twelve mammals
Twelve Australian mammal species at greatest risk of succumbing to cats and foxes have been identified in research released today. Threatened Species Recovery Hub researchers including the University of Queensland's Associate Professor Sarah Legge have revealed that potoroos, bandicoots, bettongs and native rodents are at the top of the list.

Philosophy - Earth Sciences - 21.11.2018
New Study Raises Questions About Salts Near Seasonally Darkening Streaks on Mars
New Study Raises Questions About Salts Near Seasonally Darkening Streaks on Mars
A data-processing artifact may be responsible for evidence cited in a 2015 report that cold salty waters are responsible for forming seasonally dark streaks on the surface of Mars, according to a new study from Caltech.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 20.11.2018
Catalina Island is sinking and tilting
A new analysis of marine fossils and seismic data offers keys to better modeling of global sea levels and earthquake risk in Southern California - plus the last word in a century-long debate over the motion of Catalina Island. Facebook Twitter Email One of the most striking features of Santa Catalina Island, southwest of Los Angeles, is an absence.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 19.11.2018
Exploration makes perfect
Exploration makes perfect
ESA Human Spaceflight Caves Testing the technology to explore other planets starts on Earth. While robots scout uncharted terrains, moonwalkers analyse rocks and send detailed geological descriptions to mission control. Artificial intelligence gets better with human interaction and the Moon is front of mind.

Innovation - Earth Sciences - 19.11.2018
The 'Swiss Army knife of prehistoric tools' found in Asia, independent of ancient African or European influence
The ’Swiss Army knife of prehistoric tools’ found in Asia, independent of ancient African or European influence
New analysis of artifacts found at a South China archaeological site shows that sophisticated tool technology emerged in East Asia earlier than previously thought. A study by an international team of researchers, including from the University of Washington, determines that carved stone tools, also known as Levallois cores, were used in Asia 80,000 to 170,000 years ago.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 16.11.2018
App to the Moon
App to the Moon
ESA Human Spaceflight Caves 16 November 2018 It is magnificently quiet at the rim of the lunar crater. Nearly 400 000 km away from Earth, the silence and vastness of the unknown terrain can be overwhelming. Yet our moonwalker does not feel alone. Tablet on his wrist, the astronaut snaps a 360 degree picture and marks it with some arrows to highlight geologically interesting areas.
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