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Pharmacology - Health - 19.11.2018
From Receptor Structure to New Osteoporosis Drugs
From Receptor Structure to New Osteoporosis Drugs
Researchers have determined the three-dimensional structure of a receptor that controls the release of calcium from bones. The receptor is now one of the main candidates for developing new drugs to treat osteoporosis. Knowing the receptor's blueprint will be instrumental for designing drugs that could even help to rebuild bones.

Health - Chemistry - 19.11.2018
Glucose binding molecule could transform the treatment of diabetes
Glucose binding molecule could transform the treatment of diabetes
Scientists from the University of Bristol have designed a new synthetic glucose binding molecule platform that brings us one step closer to the development of the world's first glucose-responsive insulin which, say researchers, will transform the treatment of diabetes. The World Health Organization estimate that over 382 million people worldwide, including 4.05 million people in the UK, have diabetes - a metabolic disorder affecting blood sugar levels.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.11.2018
New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease
Researchers have developed a new technique to analyse cell membrane proteins in situ which could revolutionise the way in which we study diseases, such as cancer, metabolic and heart diseases. The discovery was made as part of an international research collaboration, led by Oxford University, alongside peers including Imperial College London.

Health - 16.11.2018
HIV rates lower in states that target intimate partner violence
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Life Sciences - Health - 16.11.2018
Choosing a Career as an Immune Cell
Choosing a Career as an Immune Cell
The Big Question How do individual developing cells choose and commit to their "identity"-to become, for example, an immune cell, or a muscle cell, or a neuron? The Background T-lymphocytes are cells in the immune system that act as "intelligence agents"-they circulate throughout the body, detect threats, and determine what kind of response the immune system should make.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.11.2018
Cells decide when to divide based on their internal clocks
The time of day, determined by a cell's internal clock, has a stronger influence on cell division than previously thought, reveals a new study. Cells replicate by dividing, but scientists still don't know exactly how they decide when to split. Deciding the right time and the right size to divide is critical for cells - if something goes wrong it can have a big impact, such as with cancer, which is basically a disease of uncontrolled cell division.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.11.2018
Head injuries lead to serious brain diseases
Head injuries lead to serious brain diseases
UCLA biologists have discovered how head injuries adversely affect individual cells and genes that can lead to serious brain disorders. The life scientists provide the first cell "atlas" of the hippocampus — the part of the brain that helps regulate learning and memory — when it is affected by traumatic brain injury.

Health - Innovation - 16.11.2018
Science is keeping pace with marathoners
Science is keeping pace with marathoners
Thanks to sensors attached to their shoes, long-distance runners can harness the power of algorithms to analyze their stride. The algorithms, developed by EPFL spin-off Gait Up and tested in the Laboratory of Movement Analysis and Measurement (LMAM), are unmatched in terms of precision and the range of parameters measured, such as objective fatigue, cadence, strike angle and foot impact.

Health - 16.11.2018
Friends and family increase the risk of children becoming smokers in the UK
Teenagers whose mothers smoked during pregnancy, or whose parents or friends smoke, are more likely to smoke themselves. The findings come from a new study carried out at Imperial College London and published today in the journal Thorax , which highlights caregivers and friends as key drivers of children trying and taking up cigarette smoking.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2018
New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease
A new technique to study intact parts of cell membranes could revolutionise studies of cancer, metabolic and heart diseases. Membranes protect all of our cells and the organelles inside them, including the mitochondria - the powerhouse of the cell. These membranes are studded with biological machinery made of proteins that enable molecular cargo to pass in and out.

Environment - Health - 15.11.2018
Wildfires destroying California bring questions about health and climate
California's wildfires have destroyed homes and communities, and even people hundreds of miles away are feeling the effects of smoke. Stanford faculty weigh in on the health effects and increasing frequency of fires. Facebook Twitter Email Residents of a neighborhood sit by and watch a fire threaten their homes.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2018
Structural study of antibiotic opens the way for new TB treatments
New analysis of the structure and function of the naturally-occurring antimicrobial agent tunicamycin has revealed ways to produce new, safe antibiotics for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other disease-causing bacteria. Tunicamycin is an antibiotic produced by several types of bacteria, but it is unsuitable for use in humans because it is also toxic to animal cells.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.11.2018
Antibiotic prescribing influenced by team dynamics within hospitals
Antibiotic prescribing by doctors is influenced by team dynamics and cultures within hospitals. This is the finding of a new study, led by Imperial College London, which highlights the need for understanding contextual differences in antibiotic decision making amongst medical and surgical teams.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2018
Scouting out bacterial defences to find new ways to counter-attack antibiotic resistance
Scouting out bacterial defences to find new ways to counter-attack antibiotic resistance
Research led by the University of Bristol has begun to unpick an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and suggest approaches to block this resistance. Antibiotic resistance is the ability of bacteria to defend against antibiotic attack, and the spread of these resistance mechanisms amongst bacteria is a global public health concern.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2018
Bursting bubbles launch bacteria from water to air
Bursting bubbles launch bacteria from water to air
Study illuminates new mode of bacteria dispersal. Wherever there's water, there's bound to be bubbles floating at the surface. From standing puddles, lakes, and streams, to swimming pools, hot tubs, public fountains, and toilets, bubbles are ubiquitous, indoors and out. A new MIT study shows how bubbles contaminated with bacteria can act as tiny microbial grenades, bursting and launching microorganisms, including potential pathogens, out of the water and into the air.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2018
Stroke : preventing the damage by acting on the neuronal environment ?
Paris, 15 November 2018 To protect neurons and limit the damage after a stroke, researchers from the CNRS, the University of Caen-Normandie, University Paris-Est Créteil, and the company OTR3 have pursued an innovative path: targeting the matrix that surrounds and supports brain cells. Their results, just published in the journal Theranostics , have confirmed this strategy on rats, and will lead to a clinical study between now and late 2019.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.11.2018
A 15-minute scan could help diagnose brain damage in newborns
A 15-minute scan could help diagnose brain damage in babies up to two years earlier than current methods. In a study of over 200 babies at seven hospitals across the UK and the USA, researchers found the brain scan, called magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy, predicted damage with 98 per cent accuracy.

Health - Environment - 14.11.2018
Researchers identify a mechanism that fuels cancer cells' growth
Researchers identify a mechanism that fuels cancer cells’ growth
FINDINGS Scientists at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified sodium glucose transporter 2, or SGLT2, as a mechanism that lung cancer cells can utilize to obtain glucose, which is key to their survival and promotes tumor growth. The finding provides evidence that SGLT2 may be a novel biomarker that scientists can use to help diagnose precancerous lung lesions and early-stage lung cancers.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.11.2018
Insect Antibiotic Provides New Way to Eliminate Bacteria
Insect Antibiotic Provides New Way to Eliminate Bacteria
An antibiotic called thanatin attacks the way the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is built. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now found out that this happens through a previously unknown mechanism. Thanatin, produced naturally by the spined soldier bug, can therefore be used to develop new classes of antibiotics.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 14.11.2018
Preventing type 2 diabetes in Malawi
Researchers at the University of Glasgow are collaborating with Malawian scientists to try to find out why some people in Malawi develop type 2 diabetes - even though many are slim and highly active. Worldwide, diabetes is on the rise with almost 400 million people living with the disease - a figure that is predicted to rise to about 600 million in 2035.
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