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Health - Career - 14.12.2018
Grand Challenges Explorations grant awarded for groundbreaking research in global health and development
Grand Challenges Explorations grant awarded for groundbreaking research in global health and development
The University of Melbourne was announced as a winner of a global Grand Challenges Explorations grant - an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Professor Muthupandian Ashokkumar along with Dr Francesca Cavalieri and Dr Srinivas Mettu will pursue an innovative global health and development research project, titled 'Edible Micro-Balloons for Nutrition Enhancement', aimed at relieving malnutrition among mothers and infants in developing countries.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2018
Scientists identify method to study resilience to pain
Scientists at the Yale School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System have successfully demonstrated that it is possible to pinpoint genes that contribute to inter-individual differences in pain. Chronic pain affects an estimated 100 million people in the United States. Clinicians have long recognized that some people are more resilient to pain than others.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2018
Genetic 'missing links' underlying mechanism of psychiatric diseases
Genetic ’missing links’ underlying mechanism of psychiatric diseases
UCLA researchers, in global collaboration, gain new understanding of brain architecture of autism, schizophrenia Sarah C.P. Williams Since the completion of the groundbreaking Human Genome Project in 2003, researchers have discovered changes to hundreds of parts of DNA, called genetic variants, that are associated with autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and other psychiatric diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.12.2018
Clean cold experts launch toolkit to help tackle pollution and climate change
A study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham has used an innovative approach to identify thousands of antibiotic resistance genes found in bacteria that inhabit the human gut. The human gut is home to trillions of microorganisms, mainly bacteria. Most of these are sensitive to antibiotics, but a significant number of bacteria in the human gut have mechanisms that make them resistant to antibiotics.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2018
Autism Risk-Factors Identified in "Dark Matter" of Human Genome
Using cutting-edge statistical models to analyze data from nearly 2,000 families with an autistic child, a multi-institute research team discovered tens of thousands of rare mutations in noncoding DNA sequences and assessed if these contribute to autism spectrum disorder. Published Dec. 14 , the study is the largest to date for whole-genome sequencing in autism.

Chemistry - Health - 13.12.2018
Researchers lay foundation for smart contrast medium
Researchers lay foundation for smart contrast medium
Under the leadership of TU Graz, an international research team has developed a contrast medium concept for MRI, promising unprecedented features in medical imaging. Molecular imaging techniques are playing an increasingly important role in medical diagnostics and developing new treatment methods. An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the fields of chemistry, material sciences, biomedicine, quantum physics and toxicology has managed to develop the foundations for a novel contrast medium for MRI in the framework of the FET Open EU excellence programme.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.12.2018
Faecal transplants, 'robotic guts' and the fight against deadly gut bugs
Faecal transplants, ’robotic guts’ and the fight against deadly gut bugs
A simple compound found in our gut could help to stop dangerous bacteria behind severe, and sometimes fatal, hospital infections. Dr Ben Mullish understands more than most about the seriousness of gut bugs. Although many people will appear to have no more than an upset stomach for a couple of days, infections of the gut and intestines can prove deadly to vulnerable patients, such as the elderly or those undergoing cancer therapy.

Health - Pharmacology - 13.12.2018
Ingestible capsule can be controlled wirelessly
Ingestible capsule can be controlled wirelessly
Electronic pill can relay diagnostic information or release drugs in response to smartphone commands. Researchers at MIT, Draper, and Brigham and Women's Hospital have designed an ingestible capsule that can be controlled using Bluetooth wireless technology. The capsule, which can be customized to deliver drugs, sense environmental conditions, or both, can reside in the stomach for at least a month, transmitting information and responding to instructions from a user's smartphone.

Physics - Health - 13.12.2018
Study confirms rise in megaesophagus cases in dogs was linked to pet food
A new report has found that the increase in megaesophagus cases in Australia in 2017 and 2018 can be linked to Advance Dermocare(TM) pet food. Megaesophagus is an enlargement of the oesophagus (the muscular tube connecting the throat to the stomach) that limits the movement of food and liquid down to the stomach.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.12.2018
15 percent of babies exposed to Zika before birth had severe abnormalities in first 18 months of life
15 percent of babies exposed to Zika before birth had severe abnormalities in first 18 months of life
FINDINGS Researchers evaluated motor skills and cognitive development, visual and hearing function, and brain images of children who had been exposed to the Zika virus during their mothers' pregnancies. By the age of 12 to 18 months, significant problems were present in seven of the 112 children (6.25 percent) who were evaluated for eye abnormalities, in six of the 49 children (12.2 percent) evaluated for hearing problems, and in 11 of the 94 children (11.7 percent) evaluated for severe delays in language, motor skills and/or cognitive function who also had brain imaging.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2018
Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find
Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find
When Seattle Public Schools announced that it would reorganize school start times across the district for the fall of 2016, the massive undertaking took more than a year to deploy. Elementary schools started earlier, while most middle and all of the district's 18 high schools shifted their opening bell almost an hour later - from 7:50 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. Parents had mixed reactions.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.12.2018
Researchers use zinc to target insulin-producing cells with regenerative drug
To treat diabetes directly, rather than manage its symptoms, doctors need a way to get drugs to cells that produce insulin. The key, Stanford researchers report, may be those cells' affinity for zinc. An insulin injection can manage diabetes symptoms, but actually curing the disease would mean healing cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, a hormone that regulates the amount of sugar in blood.

Social Sciences - Health - 12.12.2018
University of Birmingham awards honorary degrees
Community screening for osteoporosis could prevent more than a quarter of hip fractures in older women, according to new research. A new study, published in The Lancet , has shown that a simple questionnaire, combined with bone mineral density measurements for some, would help identify those at risk of hip fracture.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.12.2018
The blood test that could save sight
The blood test that could save sight
A new blood test is being developed at The Australian National University (ANU) that can detect patients at risk of dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and potentially save millions of people from going blind. Dry AMD is a common eye disorder that is caused by damage to the macular - the part of the eye that is responsible for our sharpest vision.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2018
MON 810 and NK603 GM Maize: No Effects Detected on Rat Health or Metabolism
MON 810 and NK603 GM Maize: No Effects Detected on Rat Health or Metabolism
A diet based on MON 810 or NK603 transgenic maize does not affect the health or metabolism of rats, under the conditions of the GMO 90+1 project 1 . This unprecedented study performed by a research consortium led by Inra brought together a number of partners 2 , including Inserm. For six months, rats were fed a diet containing either GM maize (MON 810 or NK603) or non-GM maize, in varying concentrations.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2018
Enrichment of resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants
Enrichment of resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants
Although wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) remove over 95 per cent of human fecal bacteria, many resistant bacteria can still be detected in the final effluent. How is this to be explained? To find out, a group led by microbiologist Helmut Bürgmann investigated the fate and expression of antibacterial resistance genes in the course of treatment at twelve WWTPs.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2018
How bacterial communities transport nutrients
How bacterial communities transport nutrients
Figuring out how bacteria bring in nutrients could point to ways of killing them without poison. More generally, this research could also reveal how small organisms cooperate by generating networks of flow patterns. Facebook Twitter Email Under threat of being scrubbed away with disinfectant, individual bacteria can improve their odds of survival by joining together to form colonies, called biofilms.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.12.2018
Findings from Havana embassy phenomenon
A UM medical team has released the first report of acute symptoms and clinical findings in 25 personnel living in the U.S. Embassy in Havana. A team of University of Miami Miller School of Medicine faculty, along with collaborators from the University of Pittsburgh, today presented the first report of acute symptoms and clinical findings in 25 diplomatic personnel living in the U.S. Embassy in Havana, Cuba, who experienced severe neurosensory symptoms after exposure to a unique sound and pressure phenomenon.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2018
Gut hormone increases response to food
Ghrelin promotes conditioning to food-related odours The holiday season is a hard one for anyone watching their weight. The sights and smells of food are hard to resist. One factor in this hunger response is a hormone found in the stomach that makes us more vulnerable to tasty food smells, encouraging overeating and obesity.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.12.2018
To guide cancer therapy, device quickly tests drugs on tumor tissue
To guide cancer therapy, device quickly tests drugs on tumor tissue
Inexpensive 3-D-printed microfluidics device could be used to personalize cancer treatment. MIT researchers have 3-D printed a novel microfluidic device that simulates cancer treatments on biopsied tumor tissue, so clinicians can better examine how individual patients will respond to different therapeutics - before administering a single dose.