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Pharmacology - Health - 11.12.2018
Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells
Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells
A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth - this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in "Cell Reports", the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

Health - 11.12.2018
BMI is a good measure of health after all
BMI is a good measure of health after all
A new study from the University of Bristol supports body mass index (BMI) as a useful tool for assessing obesity and health. A simple measure based on weight and height, BMI is widely used to assess if a person is of a healthy weight. But its reliability as a health measure is often criticised, as it does not distinguish fat from muscle and does not tell us where body fat is stored.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.12.2018
Breast cancer drug could create chink in the armour of pancreatic cancer
Breast cancer drug could create chink in the armour of pancreatic cancer
The well-known drug tamoxifen could exploit a weakness in the physical 'scaffolds' around tumours, according to research led by Imperial. The report's authors, led by Imperial College London, say that following further research, the drug might in future be repurposed to help treat pancreatic cancer as well.

Health - Economics / Business - 11.12.2018
Grandfather’s high access to food increases grandson’s mortality risk
New research has revealed how a paternal grandfather's access to abundant food as a young boy causes their grandsons to have a higher risk of dying. The findings, published today , show that good access to food at the pre-pubescent age of nine to 12 means their grandsons - but not their granddaughters - die on average earlier, especially from cancer.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2018
What social stress in monkeys can tell us about human health
What social stress in monkeys can tell us about human health
Research in recent years has linked a person's physical or social environment to their well-being. Stress wears down the body and compromises the immune system, leaving a person more vulnerable to illnesses and other conditions. Various stressors, from family adversity to air pollution, can lead to inflammation, diabetes and heart disease.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.12.2018
Childhood leukaemia distinct from adult disease
Scientists have identified and modelled a distinct biology for paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia, one of the major causes of death in children.‌ ‌‌ The breakthrough research, from the University of Glasgow's Institute of Cancer Sciences and published , significantly advances understanding of the disease and provides potential for developing specific treatment strategies for this childhood cancer, which is currently treated with therapies extrapolated from adult practice.

Health - 11.12.2018
UofG projects win funding to bring origami diagnostics to low-income countries
University of Glasgow engineers have secured funding to develop new medical diagnostic technologies to help treat infectious diseases in Africa and Vietnam. The Royal Academy of Engineering will provide 53,000in support as part of their Frontiers of Engineering for Development programme, which aims to initiate collaborations between early career researchers around the world to tackle challenges faced by low and middle income countries.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2018
Eleven new epilepsy genes point to potential new ways to prevent seizures
Epilepsy researchers from around the world have examined the DNA of more than 45 000 people, leading to the discovery of 11 genes associated with the disorder and pointing the way to drugs that might benefit millions of patients who do not respond to existing treatments. Researchers led by University of Melbourne clinical neurologist Sam Berkovic compared the DNA of more than 15 000 people with epilepsy to the DNA of 30 000 control people without the disorder.

Health - 11.12.2018
New ways to strip unconscious bias from the job market
Changing language in job advertisements and de-identifying CVs during recruitment can significantly boost a person's prospects of landing a job by overcoming unconscious bias, new University of Melbourne research shows. Removing country of birth from individuals' CVs improved overseas-born job seekers' chances of being shortlisted by eight per cent, in a randomized controlled trial of 311 applicants.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.12.2018
New genetic study could lead to better treatment of severe asthma
The largest-ever genetic study of people with moderate-to-severe asthma has revealed new insights into the underlying causes of the disease which could help improve its diagnosis and treatment. Between 10-15% of individuals with asthma have the severe type of the condition which does not respond to conventional treatment.

Health - 10.12.2018
People with diabetes are more at risk of heart failure
Researchers have found that incidence of heart failure was around two-fold higher in people with diabetes. The study, led by the University of Glasgow on behalf of the Scottish Diabetes Research Network and published today in Circulation , found that patients with Type 1 diabetes were also more likely to die as a result of heart failure, in comparison with patients with type 2 diabetes and those without diabetes.

Health - Pharmacology - 10.12.2018
Few countries offer free early childhood education, UCLA research finds
Few countries offer free early childhood education, UCLA research finds
Numerous studies from around the globe have shown that education before primary school is associated with children's success in school. Still, few governments make tuition-free pre-primary education available for two or more years, according to a new study by the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health's WORLD Policy Analysis Center.

Health - 10.12.2018
'Grounded running' drastically reduces the loading on the musculoskeletal system
’Grounded running’ drastically reduces the loading on the musculoskeletal system
Ghent University scientists, in collaboration with American and Japanese researchers, unraveled the "grounded running" pattern, which drastically reduces the loading on the musculoskeletal system compared to the "classical" running pattern. Benefits (and disadvantages) of running Distance running is one of the most popular forms of physical activity, with health benefits given as one of the main reasons to go for a run.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.12.2018
Social interactions among gut microbes shape our lives
Social interactions among gut microbes shape our lives
When it comes to the gut, it's not which microbes you have but how they interact that appears to affect health. This insight comes from a recent study of fruit fly gut microbes that explored the puzzling results of a UC Berkeley study from 91 years ago. Conducted in 1927 by Helen Steinfeld for her Ph.D.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.12.2018
Sprayable gel developed by UCLA-led team could help the body fight off cancer after surgery
Sprayable gel developed by UCLA-led team could help the body fight off cancer after surgery
Many people who are diagnosed with cancer will undergo some type of surgery to treat their disease — almost 95 percent of people with early-diagnosed breast cancer will require surgery and it's often the first line of treatment for people with brain tumors, for example. But despite improvements in surgical techniques over the past decade, the cancer often comes back after the procedure.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.12.2018
Receiving genetic information can change risk
Simply learning of a genetic risk can alter a person's physiology, a recent study found, causing people to perform less well on exercise tests or altering hormones that indicate fullness after a meal. Facebook Twitter Email Millions of people in the United States alone have submitted their DNA for analysis and received information that not only predicts their risk for disease but, it turns out, in some cases might also have influenced that risk, according to a recent study by researchers at Stanford University.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.12.2018
Dialysis patients at risk of progressive brain injury
Kidney dialysis can cause short-term 'cerebral stunning' and may be associated with progressive brain injury in those who receive the treatment for many years. For many patients with kidney failure awaiting a kidney transplant or those not suitable for a transplant, dialysis is a life-saving treatment.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.12.2018
How does cancer spread?
How does cancer spread? While studying human brain tumour cells, a team of scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) found some answers to this crucial, yet so far unanswered question. They looked at a gene called EGFRvIII, which is present in patients with glioblastoma - a highly aggressive form of brain cancer that spreads quickly and that is difficult to treat.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.12.2018
Increasing statins dose and patient adherence could save more lives
Increasing statins dose and patient adherence could save more lives
Improving adherence to cholesterol-lowering treatments reduces cardiovascular risk for at risk patients. Thousands of heart attacks and deaths from cardiovascular disease could be prevented by patients taking higher doses of statins and taking the drugs as advised by doctors.

Health - Astronomy / Space Science - 07.12.2018
Starburst galaxies and blast injuries: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From new insights into star formation, to an annual blast injury conference, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Extreme starburst galaxies Current theories predict a maximum amount of stars that a galaxy can produce each year.