news 2018

« BACK

History/Archeology



Results 41 - 60 of 72.


Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 30.04.2018
The rose genome deciphered: from the origin of modern roses to the characteristics of their blooms
The rose genome deciphered: from the origin of modern roses to the characteristics of their blooms
The rose: an ornamental plant emblematic of the cultural and economic history of mankind. An international consortium involving INRA, ENS de Lyon, CEA, CNRS and Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, has deciphered the genome of the rose. This work has enabled them to trace the respective contributions of European and Chinese roses to the genome of modern plants, and identify all the genes involved in the pathways for the biosynthesis of perfume and colour.

Environment - History / Archeology - 20.04.2018
Rapid Evolution Fails to Save Butterflies from Extinction
Rapid Evolution Fails to Save Butterflies from Extinction
New research into the Edith's checkerspot butterfly shows how wild species react to human-induced changes to their environment. Camille Parmesan AUSTIN, Texas - New research confirms that wild species can adapt quickly to human-induced changes, but also shows how such adaptation can cause those species to be caught in deadly "eco-evolutionary traps" when humans introduce new resources in the environment and then quickly take them away.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 19.04.2018
Dodo’s violent death revealed
World famous Oxford Dodo died after being shot in the back of the head - breakthrough evidence revealed through new research by the University of Oxford's Museum of Natural History and WMG at the University of Warwick The Oxford Dodo is the only dodo specimen in the world to contain soft tissue and extractable DNA "This discovery reveals important new information about the history of the Oxford Dodo," says Professor Paul Smith from the Universit

History / Archeology - Physics - 19.04.2018
Red and yellow paint on Antonine Wall
Dr Louisa Campbell with the Summerston distance stone at The Hunterian Museum University of Glasgow archaeologist using cutting edge technology on remnants of the Antonine Wall has shown parts of it were painted in bright colours. Dr Louisa Campbell's research, which has used x-ray and laser technology to analyse parts of the Roman Empire's most north-western frontier, showed it was painted with vibrant red and yellows.

Health - History / Archeology - 16.04.2018
What’s in a name? Yale researchers track PTSD’s many identities during war
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with military activities for as long as wars have been fought - but this disorder was only named in the 1980s. A new Yale paper published April 16, 2018 in Chronic Stress documents a different kind of war - a war of words - that has been fought over the name of the disorder, and may have slowed clinical and scientific progress on the disorder.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 10.04.2018
Wildlife haven of Sulawesi much younger than first thought
An Oxford University collaboration has shed light on the origins of some of South East Asia's most iconic and unique wildlife; the 'deer-pig' (Sulawesi Babirusa), 'warty pig' and the 'miniature buffalo.' In doing so, the research has revealed that Sulawesi, the island paradise where they were discovered, is younger than previously thought.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 05.04.2018
WW1 Prisoner of War letters published 100 years after being written
WW1 Prisoner of War letters published 100 years after being written
The letters speak of love, longing, worry and war. A prisoner of war and his family writing to each other to ease the pain of separation during the First World War. Now seven months of correspondence, between Professor Archibald Allan Bowman and his wife Mabel, will be published by the University of Glasgow on the centenary of the day they were first written.

Health - History / Archeology - 04.04.2018
Inner Ear Provides Clues to Human Dispersal
Inner Ear Provides Clues to Human Dispersal
The early migration of humans out of Africa and across the world can be proven using genetic and morphological analyses. However, morphological data from the skull and skeleton often only allow limited conclusions to be drawn about the geographical dispersal pattern, especially because of the many ways in which the human skeleton adapts to local environmental conditions.

Computer Science - History / Archeology - 03.04.2018
Algorithms reveal changes in stereotypes
New Stanford research shows that, over the past century, linguistic changes in gender and ethnic stereotypes correlated with major social movements and demographic changes in the U.S. Census data. Artificial intelligence systems and machine-learning algorithms have come under fire recently because they can pick up and reinforce existing biases in our society, depending on what data they are programmed with.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 21.03.2018
Macaques choose stone tools based on own size and strength
Macaques choose stone tools based on own size and strength
Macaques appear to select stone tools to crack open oil palm nuts based on the size and strength of their own body, rather than the optimum weight and size of the stone, to make the process more efficient, according to new research led by UCL.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 21.03.2018
Oldest DNA from Africa offers clues to ancient cultures
One of the Taforalt skeletons under excavation by Louise Humphrey of the Natural History Museum and part of the frontal of a LSA human skull. Photo Credit: Ian Cartwright, School of Archaeology. The discovery of DNA - the oldest ever obtained from ancient African remains, has shed light on the continent's prehistoric migration patterns and cultures.

History / Archeology - 21.03.2018
Research sheds new light on prehistory of Dravidian languages and their speakers
Research sheds new light on prehistory of Dravidian languages and their speakers
Using new linguistic analyses, a study, co-authored by the University of Bristol, has shown that the Dravidian languages - spoken by 220 million people across South Asia, date back to about 4,500 years ago. The findings, published today in the journal Royal Society Open Science , shed new light on the prehistory of these languages, of which there are around 80 varieties, and their speakers.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 19.03.2018
Volcanic eruption influenced Iceland's conversion to Christianity
Volcanic eruption influenced Iceland’s conversion to Christianity
Memories of the largest lava flood in the history of Iceland, recorded in an apocalyptic medieval poem, were used to drive the island's conversion to Christianity, new research suggests. With a firm date for the eruption, many entries in medieval chronicles snap into place as likely consequences. Clive Oppenheimer A team of scientists and medieval historians, led by the University of Cambridge, has used information contained within ice cores and tree rings to accurately date a massive volcanic eruption, which took place soon after the island was first settled.

Physics - History / Archeology - 14.03.2018
China’s ’war against pollution’ shows promising results, study finds
"Physicists do not live in an ivory tower; they are not spared the ravages of history," wrote Prof. Peter Freund upon his retirement at the University of Chicago in 2002, following a half-century career in supersymmetry and string theory. Freund knew. Born into a Romanian Jewish family during a tumultuous era in Europe, he narrowly avoided the Holocaust and later a Communist firing squad before escaping the country.

History / Archeology - 09.03.2018
Going ballistic! Science meets conservation on The Mary Rose
Going ballistic! Science meets conservation on The Mary Rose
Major advances into how to protect and preserve a huge haul of cannonballs found on Henry VIII's flagship vessel The Mary Rose, have been made through a ground-breaking partnership between UCL, The Mary Rose and Diamond Light Source. The Mary Rose is a famous Tudor ship that sank in 1545 and was raised from the sea in 1982, when 1,200 cannonballs were discovered.

History / Archeology - 08.03.2018
StructuralNavigation_Title
StructuralNavigation_Title
Deep in a swamp in the Russian republic of Tuva, SNSF-funded archaeologist Gino Caspari has discovered an undisturbed Scythian burial mound. All the evidence suggests that this is not only the largest Scythian princely tomb in South Siberia, but also the earliest - and that it may be harbouring some outstandingly well-preserved treasures.

History / Archeology - Career - 05.03.2018
Ancient Nubia (present-day Sudan) : In the footsteps of the Napata and Meroe kingdoms
Ancient Nubia (present-day Sudan) : In the footsteps of the Napata and Meroe kingdoms
The archaeological site of Sedeinga is located in Sudan, a hundred kilometers to the north of the third cataract of the Nile, on the river's western shore. Known especially for being home to the ruins of the Egyptian temple of Queen Tiye, the royal wife of Amenhotep III, the site also includes a large necropolis containing sepulchers dating from the kingdoms of Napata and Mereo (seventh century BCE–fourth century CE), a civilization 1 mixing local traditions and Egyptian influences.

Mathematics - History / Archeology - 27.02.2018
Scientists detect how words grow new meanings. Maybe computers will, too
Scientists detect how words grow new meanings. Maybe computers will, too
What are voice-controlled personal assistants like Alexa and Siri to do when faced with words like "face” that have multiple meanings ranging from a body part to an action? Scientists from UC Berkeley, the University of Toronto and Lehigh University in Pennsylvania have begun to identify the algorithms humans have used over the last thousand years to give words new meanings.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 22.02.2018
Beaker culture in Britain came about through large-scale migration
Beaker culture in Britain came about through large-scale migration
Beaker pottery and culture spread through large-scale migration of people and through the exchange of new ideas, according to new research by an international team involving UCL scientists. The study involved analysis of ancient-DNA data from 400 prehistoric skeletons drawn from sites across Europe. It is the largest study of ancient human DNA ever conducted.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 19.02.2018
Ancient genome study identifies traces of indigenous
Ancient genome study identifies traces of indigenous "Taíno" in present-day Caribbean populations
A thousand-year-old tooth has provided genetic evidence that the so-called "Taíno", the first indigenous Americans to feel the full impact of European colonisation after Columbus arrived in the New World, still have living descendants in the Caribbean today. It has always been clear that people in the Caribbean have Native American ancestry, but it was difficult to prove whether this was specifically indigenous to the Caribbean, until now.