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Results 61 - 72 of 72.


History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 14.02.2018
The history of domestication: a rabbit’s tale
Wild rabbits are widely thought to have been first tamed in 600 A.D. by French monks, when they were prized as food as a 'meat substitute' during Lent. But, according to Oxford University research, that isn't true. Domestication, which is often defined as 'the process of taming an animal and keeping it as a pet or on a farm, and the cultivation of a plant for food', can be dated using historical and archaeological records.

History / Archeology - Environment - 13.02.2018
Citrus fruit peel offers new evidence on early cultivation
Citrus fruit peel offers new evidence on early cultivation
Citrus fruit was being cultivated in India in the Late Neolithic period and in southern Thailand in the Iron Age, according to new findings by archaeologists at UCL and Peking University, Beijing. Citrus fruit are widespread and well known nearly everywhere today, but very little is known about how they were domesticated and diversified.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 07.02.2018
Face of first Brit revealed
Face of first Brit revealed
The face of 'Cheddar Man', Britain's oldest nearly complete skeleton at 10,000 years old, is revealed for the first time and with unprecedented accuracy by UCL and Natural History Museum researchers. The results indicate that Cheddar Man had blue eyes, dark coloured curly hair and 'dark to black' skin pigmentation.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 06.02.2018
Giant earthquakes: not as random as thought
Scientists discovered that giant earthquakes reoccur with relatively regular intervals. When also taking into account smaller earthquakes, the repeat interval becomes increasingly more irregular to a level where earthquakes happen randomly in time. In their recent paper in Earth and Planetary Science Letters , Moernaut`s team of Belgian, Chilean and Swiss researchers presented a new approach to tackle the problem of large earthquake recurrence.

Astronomy / Space Science - History / Archeology - 05.02.2018
Colourful photo reveals cannibalism in galaxy cluster
Colourful photo reveals cannibalism in galaxy cluster
Astronomers have managed to take unusually colourful images of a group of galaxies using a telescope in Hawaii. The photos reveal new facts about this spectacular galaxy cluster. Remnants of star matter attest to a phenomenon known as galactic cannibalism. Colourful clutter of both distant galaxies and foregrounded stars in our own galaxy.

History / Archeology - 02.02.2018
Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking age
Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking age
A team of archaeologists, led by Cat Jarman from the University of Bristol's Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, has discovered that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead. Although the remains were initially thought to be associated with the Vikings, radiocarbon dates seemed to suggest the grave consisted of bones collected over several centuries.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 31.01.2018
Reconstructing an ancient lethal weapon
Reconstructing an ancient lethal weapon
Archaeologists are a little like forensic investigators: They scour the remains of past societies, looking for clues in pottery, tools and bones about how people lived, and how they died. And just as detectives might re-create the scene of a crime, University of Washington archaeologists have re-created the weapons used by hunter-gatherers in the post-Ice Age Arctic some 14,000 years ago.

Art and Design - History / Archeology - 25.01.2018
Major Robert Burns Research Revealed - 50 songs were not by Scotland's national bard
Major Robert Burns Research Revealed - 50 songs were not by Scotland’s national bard
UofG's @P14Murray revealed on @BBCTheOneShow that up to 50 #RobertBurns songs were not really by the Bard! #BurnsNight2018 #UofGRabbie #CheerstoRabbie https://t.co/ZuzzWI7unB pic.twitter.com/0uB6BqTNy8 — University of Glasgow (@UofGlasgow) January 25, 2018 ‌Some 50 airs in an 18th century landmark publication credited with saving Scotland's folk song tradition were not by Robert Burns, according to new University of Glasgow research.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 24.01.2018
Frozen in time: glacial archaeology on the roof of Norway
Frozen in time: glacial archaeology on the roof of Norway
Artefacts revealed by melting ice patches in the high mountains of Oppland shed new light on ancient high-altitude hunting. Town-dwellers needed mountain products such as antlers for artefact manufacture and probably also furs James Barrett Climate change is one of the most important issues facing people today and year on year the melting of glacial ice patches in Scandinavia, the Alps and North America reveals and then destroys vital archaeological records of past human activity.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 17.01.2018
Origins of the Bornean elephant
The mystery behind the origins of the Bornean elephant has been uncovered by collaborative research between Cardiff University and researchers across the globe. How the endangered species of elephants came to live in Borneo has been unknown, until a recent study discovered part of the story, finding that elephants might have migrated between the Sunda Islands in Southeast Asia during low sea levels.

History / Archeology - 11.01.2018
Bernese archaeologist discovers the earliest tomb of a Scythian prince
Bernese archaeologist discovers the earliest tomb of a Scythian prince
Deep in a swamp in the Russian republic of Tuva, SNSF-funded archaeologist Gino Caspari has discovered an undisturbed Scythian burial mound. All the evidence suggests that this is not only the largest Scythian princely tomb in South Siberia, but also the earliest - and that it may be harbouring some outstandingly well-preserved treasures.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 03.01.2018
Direct genetic evidence of founding population reveals story of first Native Americans
Direct genetic evidence of founding population reveals story of first Native Americans
Direct genetic traces of the earliest Native Americans have been identified for the first time in a new study. The genetic evidence suggests that people may have entered the continent in a single migratory wave, perhaps arriving more than 20,000 years ago.