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Innovation - 24.12.2018
Mission accomplished for ESA's butane-propelled CubeSat
Mission accomplished for ESA’s butane-propelled CubeSat
The cereal-box sized GomX-4B - ESA's biggest small CubeSat yet flown - has completed its mission for the Agency, testing out new miniaturised technologies including: intersatellite link communication with its GomX-4A twin, a hyperspectral imager, star tracker and butane-based propulsion system. "This multifaceted little mission has performed extremely well in flight," says Roger Walker, overseeing ESA's Technology CubeSats.

Innovation - 24.12.2018
Mission accomplished for ESA's GomX-4B butane-propelled CubeSat
Mission accomplished for ESA’s GomX-4B butane-propelled CubeSat
The cereal-box sized GomX-4B - ESA's biggest small CubeSat yet flown - has completed its mission for the Agency, testing out new miniaturised technologies including: intersatellite link communication with its GomX-4A twin, a hyperspectral imager, star tracker and butane-based propulsion system. "This multifaceted little mission has performed extremely well in flight," says Roger Walker, overseeing ESA's Technology CubeSats.

Innovation - 19.12.2018
Cheaper, more efficient solar technology a step closer
A new study led by The Australian National University (ANU) could lead to cheaper and more efficient solar technology. Study co-author Dr Heping Shen from the ANU School of Engineering says the current solar cell market is dominated by silicon-based technology, which is nearing its efficiency limit.

Innovation - Computer Science - 18.12.2018
RFID Tag Arrays Track Body Movements, Shape Changes
Washable, battery-free tags could be cheaply embedded in clothing Carnegie Mellon University researchers have found ways to track body movements and detect shape changes using arrays of RFID tags. RFID-embedded clothing thus could be used to control avatars in video games - much like in the movie "Ready Player One." Or embedded clothing could to tell you when you should sit up straight - much like your mother.

Health - Innovation - 18.12.2018
University of Birmingham leads discussions on boosting ’clean cold’ in India
The visual inspection of a suspicious skin lesion using the naked eye alone is not enough to ensure the accurate diagnosis of skin cancer, a group of experts have concluded following a largescale systematic review of research. Published today in The Cochrane Library, the Special Collection of Cochrane Systematic Reviews brings together a review of a large body of research on the accuracy of tests used to diagnose skin cancer.

Innovation - 17.12.2018
UW Evans School study of Fauntleroy ferry service proposes improvements to technology, engagement
Suggested upgrades to technology, training and communication - and funding them appropriately - lie at the heart of recommendations to the state from researchers at the University of Washington after a months-long study of service at the Fauntleroy Ferry Terminal in West Seattle. They also suggest: Ramp up the ferries' social media presence and other public engagement efforts, use "Good to Go!” tolling technology and expand mobile transactions to improve ticketing and loading processes.

Innovation - Materials Science - 17.12.2018
Top-notch research is the basis for a successful technology transfer
Top-notch research is the basis for a successful technology transfer
In such a highly competitive environment as scientific research, it is a good idea to ask yourself on a regular basis just how well you fare by international comparison. With this in mind, Empa conducted a peer review last October: eleven international experts from all of Empa's areas of activity scrutinized the institute's output in research and innovation and compared it with the rest of the world.

Health - Innovation - 17.12.2018
Wound care revolution: Put away your rulers and reach for your phone
Monitoring a wound is critical, especially in diabetic patients, whose lack of sensation due to nerve damage can lead to infection of a lesion and, ultimately, amputation. Clinicians and healthcare professionals at the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) and other hospitals believe that the use of a new app, Swift Skin and Wound(TM), which accurately measures and charts the progression of skin wounds, could potentially have a significant impact on clinical management and patient outcomes.

Innovation - Transport - 04.12.2018
New passenger scanner uses space technology to speed up airport security
A super-sensitive passenger scanner that reveals hidden security threats is being trialled at Cardiff Airport in the UK. The walk-through scanner, which uses space technology to image human body heat, is the result of a collaboration between Sequestim Ltd. and Cardiff University scientists. Computer learning allows the scanner to distinguish between threats and non-threats but without the need for passengers to keep still or remove outer clothing.

Innovation - Environment - 04.12.2018
The future energy system and
The future energy system and "Power-to-X"
In a joint research project involving five Swiss Competence Centers for Energy Research (SCCERs), scientists from the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Empa, ETH Zurich, the Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW), the Rapperswil University of Applied Sciences (HSR), the University of Geneva and the University of Lucerne have drawn up a White Paper entitled "Power-to-X" for the Swiss Federal Energy Research Commission (CORE).

Physics - Innovation - 03.12.2018
New quantum materials could take computers beyond the semiconductor era
New quantum materials could take computers beyond the semiconductor era
Researchers from Intel Corp. and UC Berkeley are looking beyond current transistor technology and preparing the way for a new type of memory and logic circuit that could someday be in every computer on the planet. In a paper appearing online Dec.

Health - Innovation - 29.11.2018
New report calls for cultural shift in use of patient data by NHS and health technology companies
A radical culture change in the NHS and across the health data and medical technology community is needed to ensure the NHS can deliver the benefits of new health technologies, says a new report co-authored by a University of Oxford scientist. The report, published by the Academy of Medical Sciences , outlines principles that must be adopted by the NHS and medical industry so that digital information about patients can be used in smarter, more joined-up ways to revolutionise healthcare and support life-saving research.

Innovation - Physics - 29.11.2018
Team blasts Intel's new AI chip with radiation at CERN
Team blasts Intel’s new AI chip with radiation at CERN
ESA Space Engineering & Technology Preparing for the Future Shaping the Future 29 November 2018 An ESA-led team subjected Intel's new Myriad 2 artificial intelligence chip to one of the most energetic radiation beams available on Earth. This test of its suitability to fly in space took place at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research.

Innovation - Computer Science - 28.11.2018
Evaluating the Use of Automated Facial Recognition Technology in Major Policing Operations
The project by the Universities' Police Science Institute evaluated South Wales Police's deployment of Automated Facial Recognition across several major sporting and entertainment events in Cardiff city over more than a year, including the UEFA Champion's League Final and the Autumn Rugby Internationals.

Innovation - 27.11.2018
Green and edible cling film and food packaging made from plants
University of Nottingham researchers have developed 100 percent biodegradable and edible food packaging made from plant carbohydrates and proteins to replace polluting plastic materials and improve storage, safety and shelf life. The Sino-UK project is led by Professor Saffa Riffat , from the Faculty of Engineering, whose research group is world-renown for innovations in sustainable materials, energy and building technologies.

Innovation - 22.11.2018
Research sheds light on Early Stuart England pamphleteering
Research undertaken at the University of Birmingham has found that young people are able to judge which health related apps are relevant to their age and bodies, are able to source appropriate digital content as well as dismiss app content that might be harmful to them.

Physics - Innovation - 21.11.2018
Electrical cable triggers lightweight, fire-resistant cladding discovery
Electrical cable triggers lightweight, fire-resistant cladding discovery
A University of Melbourne researcher has led the successful development of an organic, non-combustible and lightweight cladding core - a product that was previously thought to be impossible to create. Typically, lightweight cladding is made from organic, carbon-based, composite materials like plastic, but these materials by their nature are combustible.

Innovation - Physics - 20.11.2018
Explaining the plummeting cost of solar power
Explaining the plummeting cost of solar power
Researchers uncover the factors that have caused photovoltaic module costs to drop by 99 percent. The dramatic drop in the cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules, which has fallen by 99 percent over the last four decades, is often touted as a major success story for renewable energy technology. But one question has never been fully addressed: What exactly accounts for that stunning drop? A new analysis by MIT researchers has pinpointed what caused the savings, including the policies and technology changes that mattered most.

Electroengineering - Innovation - 19.11.2018
Imec, Ghent University and SEED Demonstrate Electronics in Hydrogel-based Soft Lenses
Imec, Ghent University and SEED Demonstrate Electronics in Hydrogel-based Soft Lenses
imec, Ghent University, and SEED Co. Ltd. have developed a contact lens with autonomous electronics, opening the door to unique applications such as lenses with sensors and/or drug-delivery systems for the treatment of eye disorders. At the imec technology forum Japan (ITF Japan 2018), imec, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics and digital technologies, Ghent University, and contact lens manufacturer SEED Co.

Innovation - Earth Sciences - 19.11.2018
The 'Swiss Army knife of prehistoric tools' found in Asia, independent of ancient African or European influence
The ’Swiss Army knife of prehistoric tools’ found in Asia, independent of ancient African or European influence
New analysis of artifacts found at a South China archaeological site shows that sophisticated tool technology emerged in East Asia earlier than previously thought. A study by an international team of researchers, including from the University of Washington, determines that carved stone tools, also known as Levallois cores, were used in Asia 80,000 to 170,000 years ago.
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