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Life Sciences - 27.11.2018
Unusual hallmark of aging in neurons
Unusual hallmark of aging in neurons
Snippets of RNA that accumulate in brain cells could interfere with normal function. As we age, neurons in our brains can become damaged by free radicals. MIT biologists have now discovered that this type of damage, known as oxidative stress, produces an unusual pileup of short snippets of RNA in some neurons.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.11.2018
Stigma impairs cognition in men living with HIV
Reducing stigma may address cognitive impairment in this population A new study has drawn a direct link between the amount of stigma men with HIV report experiencing and their scores on cognitive tests, measuring abilities such as memory and attention. The study, by researchers from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro), McGill University, and the McGill University Health Centre tested 512 older Caucasian men living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), drawn from clinics across Canada and part of the Positive Brain Health Now cohort.

Veterinary - Life Sciences - 26.11.2018
Cribbing Horses Can also Solve Complex Tasks
Cribbing Horses Can also Solve Complex Tasks
A study conducted by Agroscope's Swiss National Stud Farm (SNSF) in collaboration with the University of Neuchâtel refuted the assumption that cribbing horses perform less well in complicated learning situations than other horses. All horses in the study were able to recognise symbols as well as solve inverse conclusion exercises, which are difficult for horses.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.11.2018
Discovery opens new opportunities to slow or reverse MS
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 11/26/18 × Three cross-section images of nerve tissue from cats shows nerve cell axons (nearly white) surrounded by sheaths of myelin (dark gray to black). Mature myelin coatings are thick. Thin lines of myelin reveal axons that lost their myelin to disease, and were re-sheathed by neighboring oligodendrocyte cells (appearing in medium gray).

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 26.11.2018
Study in mice suggests drug to turn fat 'brown' could help fight obesity
Study in mice suggests drug to turn fat ’brown’ could help fight obesity
Our bodies contain two types of fat: white fat and brown fat. While white fat stores calories, brown fat burns energy and could help us lose weight. Now, scientists at the University of Cambridge have found a way of making the white fat 'browner' and increasing the efficiency of brown fat.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.11.2018
New evidence shows chemotherapy, radiation cancer treatments may be linked to decline in cognitive performance
New evidence shows chemotherapy, radiation cancer treatments may be linked to decline in cognitive performance
Health + Behavior UCLA RESEARCH ALERT Duane Bates FINDINGS UCLA researchers conducted a study of breast cancer survivors to better understand if lower activity of telomerase (an enzyme that helps maintain the health of cells) along with DNA damage (a factor in cellular aging) were associated with worse cognitive performance, such as attention and motor skills.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.11.2018
Researchers identify brain changes in schizophrenia patients
Researchers have unlocked details revealing how brains change in people with schizophrenia and evidence suggesting that in the early stages of the illness the brain may be compensating for damage caused. Researchers from the University of Melbourne, Monash University, University of Sydney and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, hope their findings will improve our understanding of the illness and contribute to improved treatments.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.11.2018
Breastfeeding: Babies’ response to facial touch measured with 3D printed device
Facial sense of touch is important to enable babies breastfeed; this new device could help researchers understand when things go wrong. Babies need a sense of touch in their faces to give contact feedback to the brain, which in turn helps the baby find the nipple to breastfeed. For example, if a newborn baby's right cheek is lying on their mother's breast, the baby feeds back the sensory information from its cheek to the brain, which then signals the baby to turn its head to the right and 'root' for the nipple.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 22.11.2018
The origins of asymmetry : A protein that makes you do the twist
The origins of asymmetry : A protein that makes you do the twist
Paris, 22 November 2018 Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand … A team from the Institute of biology Valrose (CNRS/Inserm/Université Côte d'Azur), in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Pennsylvania, has shown how a single protein induces a spiral motion in another molecule.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.11.2018
NIPT can detect blood cancers before symptoms appear
The non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT), developed to detect Down syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities in unborn children, can also detect blood cancers. Not just in pregnant women but in everyone. This is because the test examines the DNA that is circulating in the blood - and that may include the genetic material of cancer cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.11.2018
Top ten universities for animal research announced
Top ten universities for animal research announced
Understanding Animal Research, an organisation promoting greater openness about animal research, has today released a list of the ten universities in the UK that conduct the highest number of animal procedures - those used in medical, veterinary and scientific research. These statistics are freely available on the universities' websites as part of their ongoing commitment to transparency and openness.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.11.2018
Scientists identify new genetic causes linked to abnormal pregnancies and miscarriages
A team of scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) and McGill University have identified three genes responsible for recurrent molar pregnancies, a rare complication that occurs when a non-viable pregnancy with no embryo implants in the uterus. The results of this study could have important implications, since until now very little is known about the genetic causes of all forms of fetal loss.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.11.2018
A toxic bullet involved in bacterial competition found by researchers
A toxic bullet involved in bacterial competition found by researchers
A bacterial toxin that allows an infectious strain of bacteria to defeat its competitors has been discovered by Imperial College London scientists. The finding provides a better understanding of the mechanisms behind bacterial warfare, which is the first step for the design of improved treatments for microbial diseases.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.11.2018
To predict the future, the brain has two clocks
To predict the future, the brain has two clocks
That moment when you step on the gas pedal a split second before the light changes, or when you tap your toes even before the first piano note of Camila Cabello's "Havana" is struck. That's anticipatory timing. One type relies on memories from past experiences. The other on rhythm. Both are critical to our ability to navigate and enjoy the world.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.11.2018
MDMA makes people cooperative, but not gullible
New research from King's College London has found that MDMA, the main ingredient in ecstasy, causes people to cooperate better - but only with trustworthy people. In the first study to look in detail at how MDMA impacts cooperative behaviour the researchers also identified changes to activity in brain regions linked to social processing.

Life Sciences - 19.11.2018
How the brain switches between different sets of rules
How the brain switches between different sets of rules
When you slow down after exiting the highway, or hush your voice in the library, you're using this brain mechanism. Cognitive flexibility - the brain's ability to switch between different rules or action plans depending on the context - is key to many of our everyday activities. For example, imagine you're driving on a highway at 65 miles per hour.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.11.2018
Transparent Fruit Flies
Transparent Fruit Flies
Advances in cellular microscopy: at TU Wien (Vienna), flies were made transparent, so that individual nerve cells, marked with fluorescent molecules, can be examined directly in the animal. The nervous system of an animal can be studied by cutting it up into thin layers - however this inevitably leads to the destruction of the cellular structures in the tissue.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 16.11.2018
Freeze-frame microscopy captures molecule's 'lock-and-load' on DNA
Freeze-frame microscopy captures molecule’s ’lock-and-load’ on DNA
Pushing the limits of cryo-electron microscopy, University of California, Berkeley, scientists have captured freeze-frames of the changing shape of a huge molecule, one of the body's key molecular machines, as it locks onto DNA and loads the machinery for reading the genetic code. The molecule, called transcription factor IID, is critical to transcribing genes into RNA that will later be used as blueprints to make proteins.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.11.2018
New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease
Researchers have developed a new technique to analyse cell membrane proteins in situ which could revolutionise the way in which we study diseases, such as cancer, metabolic and heart diseases. The discovery was made as part of an international research collaboration, led by Oxford University, alongside peers including Imperial College London.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.11.2018
Choosing a Career as an Immune Cell
Choosing a Career as an Immune Cell
The Big Question How do individual developing cells choose and commit to their "identity"-to become, for example, an immune cell, or a muscle cell, or a neuron? The Background T-lymphocytes are cells in the immune system that act as "intelligence agents"-they circulate throughout the body, detect threats, and determine what kind of response the immune system should make.
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