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Life Sciences - Health - 16.11.2018
Cells decide when to divide based on their internal clocks
The time of day, determined by a cell's internal clock, has a stronger influence on cell division than previously thought, reveals a new study. Cells replicate by dividing, but scientists still don't know exactly how they decide when to split. Deciding the right time and the right size to divide is critical for cells - if something goes wrong it can have a big impact, such as with cancer, which is basically a disease of uncontrolled cell division.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.11.2018
Head injuries lead to serious brain diseases
Head injuries lead to serious brain diseases
UCLA biologists have discovered how head injuries adversely affect individual cells and genes that can lead to serious brain disorders. The life scientists provide the first cell "atlas" of the hippocampus — the part of the brain that helps regulate learning and memory — when it is affected by traumatic brain injury.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2018
New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease
A new technique to study intact parts of cell membranes could revolutionise studies of cancer, metabolic and heart diseases. Membranes protect all of our cells and the organelles inside them, including the mitochondria - the powerhouse of the cell. These membranes are studded with biological machinery made of proteins that enable molecular cargo to pass in and out.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2018
Structural study of antibiotic opens the way for new TB treatments
New analysis of the structure and function of the naturally-occurring antimicrobial agent tunicamycin has revealed ways to produce new, safe antibiotics for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other disease-causing bacteria. Tunicamycin is an antibiotic produced by several types of bacteria, but it is unsuitable for use in humans because it is also toxic to animal cells.

Life Sciences - Sport - 15.11.2018
Playing high school football changes the teenage brain
Playing high school football changes the teenage brain
A single season of high school football may be enough to cause microscopic changes in the structure of the brain, according to a new study by researchers at UC Berkeley, Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The researchers used a new type of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to take brain scans of 16 high school players, ages 15 to 17, before and after a season of football.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2018
Scouting out bacterial defences to find new ways to counter-attack antibiotic resistance
Scouting out bacterial defences to find new ways to counter-attack antibiotic resistance
Research led by the University of Bristol has begun to unpick an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and suggest approaches to block this resistance. Antibiotic resistance is the ability of bacteria to defend against antibiotic attack, and the spread of these resistance mechanisms amongst bacteria is a global public health concern.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2018
Bursting bubbles launch bacteria from water to air
Bursting bubbles launch bacteria from water to air
Study illuminates new mode of bacteria dispersal. Wherever there's water, there's bound to be bubbles floating at the surface. From standing puddles, lakes, and streams, to swimming pools, hot tubs, public fountains, and toilets, bubbles are ubiquitous, indoors and out. A new MIT study shows how bubbles contaminated with bacteria can act as tiny microbial grenades, bursting and launching microorganisms, including potential pathogens, out of the water and into the air.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2018
Stroke : preventing the damage by acting on the neuronal environment ?
Stroke : preventing the damage by acting on the neuronal environment ?
Paris, 15 November 2018 To protect neurons and limit the damage after a stroke, researchers from the CNRS, the University of Caen-Normandie, University Paris-Est Créteil, and the company OTR3 have pursued an innovative path: targeting the matrix that surrounds and supports brain cells. Their results, just published in the journal Theranostics , have confirmed this strategy on rats, and will lead to a clinical study between now and late 2019.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.11.2018
A 15-minute scan could help diagnose brain damage in newborns
A 15-minute scan could help diagnose brain damage in babies up to two years earlier than current methods. In a study of over 200 babies at seven hospitals across the UK and the USA, researchers found the brain scan, called magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy, predicted damage with 98 per cent accuracy.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.11.2018
First tally of U.S.-Russia polar bears finds a healthy population
First tally of U.S.-Russia polar bears finds a healthy population
Not all polar bears are in the same dire situation due to retreating sea ice, at least not right now. Off the western coast of Alaska, the Chukchi Sea is rich in marine life, but the number of polar bears in the area had never been counted. The first formal study of this population suggests that it's been healthy and relatively abundant in recent years, numbering about 3,000 animals.

Life Sciences - 14.11.2018
Neurons Reliably Respond to Straight Lines
Single neurons in the brain's primary visual cortex can reliably detect straight lines, even though the cellular makeup of the neurons is constantly changing, according to a new study by Carnegie Mellon University neuroscientists. Led by Associate Professor of Biological Sciences Sandra Kuhlman , he study's findings, published in Scientific Reports , lay the groundwork for future studies into how the sensory system reacts and adapts to changes.

Life Sciences - 14.11.2018
Venom shape untangles scorpion family tree
The scorpion Kolotl magnus from Guerrero, Mexico. UW-Madison scientists have made a fresh attempt to untangle the scorpion family tree using not the shape and structure of the arachnids' bodies, but the shape of their venom. Carlos Santibáñez-López As a child growing up in Mexico, Carlos Santibáñez-López feared the scorpions that would often decorate the walls and ceilings of his home in search of a warm place with plenty of food.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.11.2018
Tropical trees in the Andes are moving up-toward extinction
An international study led by University of Miami tropical biologists reveals that tropical trees are migrating upslope to escape climate change, but not fast enough. In the most comprehensive study of its kind, an international team of scientists led by University of Miami biologists has found that tropical and subtropical forests across South America's Andes Mountains are responding to warming temperatures by migrating to higher, cooler elevations, but probably not quickly enough to avoid the loss of their biodiversity, functional collapse, or even extinction.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.11.2018
Immunity connects gut bacteria and aging
EPFL scientists have discovered how a dysfunction in the immune system can cause an overload of a gut bacterium. The bacterium produces excess lactic acid, which in turn triggers the production of reactive oxygen species that cause damage to cells and many age-related pathologies. There is no doubt that gut bacteria have become one of the most important focuses of biological and medical research today.

Music - Life Sciences - 13.11.2018
Resonant mechanism discovery could inspire ultra-thin acoustic absorbers
Resonant mechanism discovery could inspire ultra-thin acoustic absorbers
New research led by academics at the University of Bristol has discovered that the scales on moth wings vibrate and can absorb the sound frequencies used by bats for echolocation (biological sonar). The finding could help researchers develop bioinspired thin and lightweight resonant sound absorbers.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.11.2018
Team determines how cholesterol moves inside cells
Team determines how cholesterol moves inside cells
FINDINGS The researchers found that high-density lipoprotein, or HDL, sometimes referred to as "good" cholesterol, is transported from the outer wall to the interior of cells by a protein that helps create a "bridge" between the two areas. BACKGROUND HDL cholesterol has been linked for years to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 12.11.2018
Over half a million people take part in largest ever study of psychological sex differences and autistic traits
Over half a million people take part in largest ever study of psychological sex differences and autistic traits
Scientists at the University of Cambridge have completed the world's largest ever study of typical sex differences and autistic traits. They tested and confirmed two long-standing psychological theories: the Empathising-Systemising theory of sex differences and the Extreme Male Brain theory of autism.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.11.2018
Poxvirus hijacks cell movement to spread infection
Poxvirus hijacks cell movement to spread infection
Prospective students Current students Vaccinia virus, a poxvirus closely related to smallpox and monkeypox, tricks cells it has infected into activating their own cell movement mechanism to rapidly spread the virus in cells and mice, according to a new UCL-led study. The findings explain how the virus mimics infected cells' own proteins to kick-start the signalling pathway enabling the cell to move around.

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.11.2018
Misunderstood flying fox could prove bat species demise, warn scientists
Misunderstood flying fox could prove bat species demise, warn scientists
A large fruit-eating bat native to Mauritius is the subject of controversy over the announcement of a major cull to protect the Indian island's fruit crops, despite a lack of evidence as to the extent of damage directly attributed to the endangered species. An international team of researchers, including the University of Bristol, that monitored the damage directly caused by the Mauritian flying fox to commercial fruit has found the bat is responsible for only some, and could be managed effectively without the need to cull.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.11.2018
A Chip with Blood Vessels
A Chip with Blood Vessels
Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way. Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more difficult task.
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