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Life Sciences - Health - 18.12.2018
Gently stroking babies before medical procedures may reduce pain
Researchers have found that gently stroking a baby seems to reduce activity in the infant brain associated with painful experiences. The results, published in the journal Current Biology , suggest that lightly brushing an infant at a speed of approximately 3cm per second could provide effective pain relief before clinically necessary medical procedures.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.12.2018
Mother's smoking affects baby's DNA and risk of smoking-related disease
Mother’s smoking affects baby’s DNA and risk of smoking-related disease
Smoking during pregnancy causes chemical changes to a baby's DNA that affect its risk of smoking-related conditions in adulthood, a study has found. The research, led by scientists at Imperial College London and the University of Oulu in Finland, analysed data from more than 18,000 people in several countries, including the UK, US and Australia, to study the impacts of maternal smoking on cardiovascular health.

Life Sciences - 18.12.2018
Regulating the Rapidly Developing Fruit Fly
Regulating the Rapidly Developing Fruit Fly
From birth, it takes humans almost two decades to reach adulthood; for a fruit fly, it takes only about 10 days. During a fly embryo's initial stages of development, the insect looks different from minute to minute, and its body plan is defined in just a few hours. Caltech researchers have now gained new insights into how a fly's genes influence this fast period of development-work that ultimately could shed light on the rapid cellular proliferation that occurs in other situations, including human cancers.

Environment - Life Sciences - 18.12.2018
Salmon may lose the ability to smell danger as carbon emissions rise
Salmon may lose the ability to smell danger as carbon emissions rise
The ability to smell is critical for salmon. They depend on scent to avoid predators, sniff out prey and find their way home at the end of their lives when they return to the streams where they hatched to spawn and die. New research from the University of Washington and NOAA Fisheries' Northwest Fisheries Science Center shows this powerful sense of smell might be in trouble as carbon emissions continue to be absorbed by our ocean.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.12.2018
Get a warrant: researchers demand better DNA protections
New laws are required to control access to medical genetic data by law enforcement agencies, an analysis by University of Queensland researchers has found. The academics from biology, policy and law say a Genetic Data Protection Act is needed to maintain public trust in medical genetics. UQ's Dr Caitlin Curtis said advances in technology meant genetic tests were increasingly revealing, providing information about health, predisposition to disease, and even behaviour and mental health.

Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
Progress in Super-Resolution Microscopy
Progress in Super-Resolution Microscopy
/2018 Does expansion microscopy deliver true-to-life images of cellular structures' That was not sure yet. A new publication in "Nature Methods" shows for the first time that the method actually works reliably. Immersing deeper and deeper into cells with the microscope. Imaging the nucleus and other structures more and more accurately.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
New AI system developed at UCLA, Stanford mimics how humans visualize and identify objects
New AI system developed at UCLA, Stanford mimics how humans visualize and identify objects
UCLA and Stanford University engineers have demonstrated a computer system that can discover and identify the real-world objects it "sees" based on the same method of visual learning that humans use. The system is an advance in a type of technology called "computer vision," which enables computers to read and identify visual images.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
New Avenue of Investigation for Cancer Therapy Discovered at Carnegie Mellon Qatar
Project inspires CMU-Q alumnus to pursue career in cancer research A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar (CMU-Q) has discovered a new area of research that could lead to more effective cancer treatment with fewer side effects. Ihab Younis, assistant professor of biological sciences, and Ettaib El Marabti, a 2017 graduate of CMU-Q's Biological Sciences Program , have revealed that the cellular mechanism called minor intron splicing is different in cancer cells than in normal cells.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 17.12.2018
Mapping the brain, cell by cell
Mapping the brain, cell by cell
Technique for preserving tissue allows researchers to create maps of neural circuits with single-cell resolution. MIT chemical engineers and neuroscientists have devised a new way to preserve biological tissue, allowing them to visualize proteins, DNA, and other molecules within cells, and to map the connections between neurons.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.12.2018
Discovery of novel mechanisms that cause migraines
Discovery of novel mechanisms that cause migraines
PARIS, 17 december 2018 Researchers at CNRS, Université Côte d'Azur and Inserm have demonstrated a new mechanism related to the onset of migraine. In fact, they found how a mutation, causes dysfunction in a protein which inhibits neuronal electrical activity, induces migraines. These results, published in Neuron on December 17, 2018, open a new path for the development of anti-migraine medicines.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.12.2018
How liquid droplets grow in cells
How liquid droplets grow in cells
For more than 100 years, biologists have known that cells contain various kinds of membraneless organelles and conjectured what organizing principles underlie them. During the past decade, liquid-liquid phase separation has emerged as one of the concepts that can explain these cellular structures. Phase separation has become an increasingly hot topic, as it can be related to pathologies such as neurodegenerative diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
Clues to chronic fatigue syndrome in overactive immune response
New research from King's College London finds that an exaggerated immune response can trigger long-lasting fatigue, potentially explaining how chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) begins. The study is the most in-depth biological investigation yet into the role of the immune system in lasting symptoms of fatigue.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.12.2018
The importance of ’edge populations’ to biodiversity
More than two-thirds of Canada's biodiversity is made up of species that occur within the country's borders only at the very northern edge of their range. Biologists have long debated how much effort should be dedicated to conserving these "edge populations." One argument in their favour is that they may be especially well suited to lead northward range shifts for their species as the climate warms.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.12.2018
Newly identified enzyme could play key role in childbirth, muscle diseases
Scientists at Stanford have solved a 50-year-old mystery that could open up new areas of research into muscle disorders. The study revealed a human enzyme that modifies muscle proteins to help them grow and remain strong. Facebook Twitter Email Since the 1960s, scientists have known of a modification that occurs to a particular molecule in muscles, especially after exercise.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2018
Melbourne steps up to drive global health
Melbourne steps up to drive global health
Three of Australia's child health leaders have joined forces to tackle global child health: The Murdoch Children's Research Institute, the Royal Children's Hospital and the University of Melbourne have launched a new initiative, Melbourne Children's Global Health. Melbourne Children's Global Health co-chair Andrew Steer said the creation of Melbourne Children's Global Health would help the three institutes secure research funding, strengthen their standing at international forums, and enable the researchers to better share information and resources.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2018
Scientists identify method to study resilience to pain
Scientists at the Yale School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System have successfully demonstrated that it is possible to pinpoint genes that contribute to inter-individual differences in pain. Chronic pain affects an estimated 100 million people in the United States. Clinicians have long recognized that some people are more resilient to pain than others.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2018
Genetic 'missing links' underlying mechanism of psychiatric diseases
Genetic ’missing links’ underlying mechanism of psychiatric diseases
UCLA researchers, in global collaboration, gain new understanding of brain architecture of autism, schizophrenia Sarah C.P. Williams Since the completion of the groundbreaking Human Genome Project in 2003, researchers have discovered changes to hundreds of parts of DNA, called genetic variants, that are associated with autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and other psychiatric diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.12.2018
Clean cold experts launch toolkit to help tackle pollution and climate change
A study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham has used an innovative approach to identify thousands of antibiotic resistance genes found in bacteria that inhabit the human gut. The human gut is home to trillions of microorganisms, mainly bacteria. Most of these are sensitive to antibiotics, but a significant number of bacteria in the human gut have mechanisms that make them resistant to antibiotics.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2018
Autism Risk-Factors Identified in "Dark Matter" of Human Genome
Using cutting-edge statistical models to analyze data from nearly 2,000 families with an autistic child, a multi-institute research team discovered tens of thousands of rare mutations in noncoding DNA sequences and assessed if these contribute to autism spectrum disorder. Published Dec. 14 , the study is the largest to date for whole-genome sequencing in autism.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.12.2018
Faecal transplants, 'robotic guts' and the fight against deadly gut bugs
Faecal transplants, ’robotic guts’ and the fight against deadly gut bugs
A simple compound found in our gut could help to stop dangerous bacteria behind severe, and sometimes fatal, hospital infections. Dr Ben Mullish understands more than most about the seriousness of gut bugs. Although many people will appear to have no more than an upset stomach for a couple of days, infections of the gut and intestines can prove deadly to vulnerable patients, such as the elderly or those undergoing cancer therapy.