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Life Sciences - Health - 10.12.2018
Social interactions among gut microbes shape our lives
Social interactions among gut microbes shape our lives
When it comes to the gut, it's not which microbes you have but how they interact that appears to affect health. This insight comes from a recent study of fruit fly gut microbes that explored the puzzling results of a UC Berkeley study from 91 years ago. Conducted in 1927 by Helen Steinfeld for her Ph.D.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 10.12.2018
Dopamine's yin-yang personality: It's an upper and a downer
Dopamine’s yin-yang personality: It’s an upper and a downer
For decades, psychologists have viewed the neurotransmitter dopamine as a double-edged sword: released in the brain as a reward to train us to seek out pleasurable experiences, but also a "drug" the constant pursuit of which leads to addiction. According to a new study from UC Berkeley, that's only one face of dopamine.

Life Sciences - 10.12.2018
Parrot Genome Analysis Reveals Insights into Longevity, Cognition
Genome of blue-fronted Amazon parrot compared with 30 other bird species Parrots are famously talkative and a Blue-fronted Amazon parrot named Moises - or at least its genome - is telling scientists volumes about the longevity and highly developed cognitive abilities that give parrots so much in common with humans.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.12.2018
Sprayable gel developed by UCLA-led team could help the body fight off cancer after surgery
Sprayable gel developed by UCLA-led team could help the body fight off cancer after surgery
Many people who are diagnosed with cancer will undergo some type of surgery to treat their disease — almost 95 percent of people with early-diagnosed breast cancer will require surgery and it's often the first line of treatment for people with brain tumors, for example. But despite improvements in surgical techniques over the past decade, the cancer often comes back after the procedure.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.12.2018
Receiving genetic information can change risk
Simply learning of a genetic risk can alter a person's physiology, a recent study found, causing people to perform less well on exercise tests or altering hormones that indicate fullness after a meal. Facebook Twitter Email Millions of people in the United States alone have submitted their DNA for analysis and received information that not only predicts their risk for disease but, it turns out, in some cases might also have influenced that risk, according to a recent study by researchers at Stanford University.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.12.2018
Dialysis patients at risk of progressive brain injury
Kidney dialysis can cause short-term 'cerebral stunning' and may be associated with progressive brain injury in those who receive the treatment for many years. For many patients with kidney failure awaiting a kidney transplant or those not suitable for a transplant, dialysis is a life-saving treatment.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.12.2018
How does cancer spread?
How does cancer spread? While studying human brain tumour cells, a team of scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) found some answers to this crucial, yet so far unanswered question. They looked at a gene called EGFRvIII, which is present in patients with glioblastoma - a highly aggressive form of brain cancer that spreads quickly and that is difficult to treat.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 08.12.2018
Knowledge for Growth 2019
Inleiding: 5 Flemish universities reveal innovative state-of-the-art biotech research No less than 25 technologies in drug screening, therapy development, MedTech, digital health and AI will be showc

Health - Life Sciences - 07.12.2018
Bacterial 'sleeper cells' evade antibiotics and weaken defence against infection
Bacterial ’sleeper cells’ evade antibiotics and weaken defence against infection
New research, from scientists at Imperial College London, unravels how so-called bacterial persister cells manipulate our immune cells. The work potentially opens new avenues to finding ways of clearing these bacterial cells from the body, and stopping recurrence of the bacterial infection. The latest findings may help explain why some people suffer from repeated bouts of an illness, despite taking antibiotics.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.12.2018
News About a Plant Hormone
News About a Plant Hormone
The plant hormone jasmonic acid also performs a function that was previously unknown. It ensures that the leaf pores close when leaves are injured. For the plant, this could be an emergency signal. Jasmonic acid is not just the aromatic odor of the plant Jasminum grandiflorum used in cosmetics and perfume industries.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.12.2018
Link between neonatal vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia confirmed
Newborns with vitamin D deficiency have an increased risk of schizophrenia later in life, a team of Australian and Danish researchers has reported. The discovery could help prevent some cases of the disease by treating vitamin D deficiency during the earliest stages of life. The study, led by Professor John McGrath from The University of Queensland and Aarhus University in Denmark, found newborns with vitamin D deficiency had a 44 per cent increased risk of being diagnosed with schizophrenia as adults compared to those with normal vitamin D levels.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.12.2018
Engineers repurpose wasp venom as an antibiotic drug
Engineers repurpose wasp venom as an antibiotic drug
Altered peptides from a South American wasp's venom can kill bacteria but are nontoxic to human cells. The venom of insects such as wasps and bees is full of compounds that can kill bacteria. Unfortunately, many of these compounds are also toxic for humans, making it impossible to use them as antibiotic drugs.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.12.2018
Predicting the transmission of rare, genetically based diseases
There are only 25 people in the whole of Quebec at the moment who have a rare recessive genetic disease called chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia (CAID). It is a serious disease that affects both heart rate and intestinal movements. A McGill-led research team has been able to trace the gene mutations underlying the disease back to two European founding families who arrived in the province in the 17th century.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 06.12.2018
Copycat Cells Command New Powers of Communication
From kryptonite for Superman to plant toxins for poison ivy, chemical reactions within the body's cells can be transformative. And, when it comes to transmuting cells, UC San Diego researchers are becoming superhero-like copycats. Recently named Blavatnik National Laureate in Chemistry , Neal Devaraj, along with research colleagues Henrike Niederholtmeyer and Cynthia Chaggan, used materials like clay and plastic to make synthetic cells—or "cell-mimics"—capable of gene expression and communication rivaling that of living cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.12.2018
Silicosis is on the rise, but is there a therapeutic target ?
Silicosis is on the rise, but is there a therapeutic target ?
Paris, 6 December 2018 Researchers from the CNRS, the University of Orléans, and the company Artimmune, in collaboration with Turkish clinicians from Atatürk University, have identified a key mechanism of lung inflammation induced by silica exposure, which leads to silicosis, an incurable disease. Their study in mice and patients, published (December 6th, 2018), shows that this inflammation can be prevented by extracellular DNA degradation, suggesting a new therapeutic target.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 06.12.2018
Molecular insights into spider silk
Molecular insights into spider silk
Spider silk belongs to the toughest fibres in nature and has astounding properties. Scientists from the University of Würzburg discovered new molecular details of self-assembly of a spider silk fibre protein. They are lightweight, almost invisible, highly extensible and strong, and of course biodegradable: the threads spiders use to build their webs.

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.12.2018
Under the Trafalgar Square Christmas tree
Under the Trafalgar Square Christmas tree
Tonight the crowds will gather in Trafalgar Square to see the lights on the world's most famous Christmas tree switched on. But it's the bits we can't see that make the Norway Spruce ( Picea abies ) so magnificent. CT scanning - X-Ray Computed Tomography (X-Ray CT) - is an imaging technique originally developed by Sir Godfrey Hounsfield for medical application.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.12.2018
Another Medical Cold Case Cracked by the MUHC’s ’Dr. House’
Team of RI-MUHC researchers discover new disease and its genetic cause in Quebec patient as "Bubble Boy" symptoms discovered in adults for first time A team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) led by Dr. Donald Vinh, the RI's so-called "Dr. House" because of his research into rare diseases, has discovered a new human disease and the gene responsible for it, paving the way for the proper diagnosis of patients globally and the development of new therapies.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.12.2018
New genetic insight could help treat rare debilitating heart and lung condition
New genetic insight could help treat rare debilitating heart and lung condition
The largest study of genetic variation in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension has associated two important genes with the disease. In collaboration with institutes from Europe and Northern America, researchers from Imperial College London have conducted the largest genetic analysis to date of 2,000 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and identified associations with two genes.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.12.2018
Belgian team secures million-dollar funding from Chan Zuckerberg Initiative
The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI), the philanthropic endeavour led by Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and his partner Priscilla Chan, has announced the launch of its Neurodegeneration Challenge Network. This new network brings together experimental scientists from various biomedical research fields, computational biologists, and physicians to understand the underlying causes of neurodegenerative disorders.